Chinese Businessman Destroys $750,000 Lamborghini In Fit Over Mechanical Problems

We just saw how one Chinese mogul decided to display his wealth by paying $1.5 million for the world’s most expensive dog. Now we have a Chinese businessman, Han Nan, who wanted to show his frustration over the failure of Lamborghini to fix a problem with his Gallardo. His solution: hire workers to destroy the car with sledgehammers . . . to teach his mechanic a lesson. The price of the car is much higher given the need to ship to China.


Han is a businessman from the city of Qingdao in eastern China who bought the car for about $750,000.

Han has made his money in a wholesale lighting company.

Now if he had just given it to me, I could have promised an angry letter to his mechanic every day.

By the way, Lamborghini insists that the problem was fixed. I hope someone told Han before he brought in the guys with the sledgehammers.

Source: AOL

28 thoughts on “Chinese Businessman Destroys $750,000 Lamborghini In Fit Over Mechanical Problems

  1. A mans’ gotta do what a mans gotta do…. Wholesale lighting you say…you think the mercury vapors overcame him….

  2. seamus
    1, March 23, 2011 at 9:55 am
    If those sledgehammers were made in China it’s going to take a while to destroy that car.

    =====================================

    lol

  3. What were those, rubber sledgehammers? That car needs just a little bit of bodywork and it is good to go.

    Now, having owned an Italian car at one point in my life, I can totally understand the urge to smash it. But do it properly.

  4. “His solution: hire workers to destroy the car with sledgehammers . . . to teach his mechanic a lesson”

    I would think that if the mechanic already got paid, he really wouldn’t care what this guy did with his car …

  5. This guy needs to take a pill and sleep it off. I agree with Prof. Turley. I would have been happy to take the money to assist him in getting the car fixed!

  6. He’s an idiot. Not for destroying the car. That just makes him wasteful. He’s an idiot for buying an Italian sports car and not expecting it to be as temperamental as he apparently is. Everyone knows FIAT stands for Fix It Again, Tony. And although they are spelled differently, the same applies to Ferrari, Lamborghini and Alfa-Romeo’s. I once spoke to a Ferrari mechanic who said it’s a good thing you’ve got to be wealthy to buy one because you need to buy two: one to drive while the other is in the shop.

  7. raff,

    Lottery? I’d get a Tesla and/or a Porsche for my daily driver and a Jaguar xkR-S for when I was feeling particularly naughty. What can I say? I feel the need for speed. But as much as I love Ferrari’s as art, I would never ever buy one and Lamborghini’s are just plain uncomfortable.

  8. pete,

    The only way that joke could have been better is if the guy had been named Wang instead of Han.

  9. This reminds me of the JD Powers survey of a few years back. The number one complaint of Hummer owners was poor gas mileage! REALLY! How could you be THAT stupid and still acquire enough money to buy the turd in the first place?

    Hummer = really bad MPG
    Italian sports car = frequent, large, repair bills

    Really guys – Viagra is much cheaper and solves the problem better than those cars.

  10. Really guys – Viagra is much cheaper and solves the problem better than those cars.
    —————————————-

    Killjoy

  11. Buddha Is Laughing 1, March 23, 2011 at 11:08 am

    He’s an idiot. Not for destroying the car. That just makes him wasteful. He’s an idiot for buying an Italian sports car and not expecting it to be as temperamental as he apparently is. Everyone knows FIAT stands for Fix It Again, Tony. And although they are spelled differently, the same applies to Ferrari, Lamborghini and Alfa-Romeo’s. I once spoke to a Ferrari mechanic who said it’s a good thing you’ve got to be wealthy to buy one because you need to buy two: one to drive while the other is in the shop.

    ###########################

    My first car was a 1961 Fiat 2100 Station Wagon. Some friends has bought it new and had trouble starting it in the winter, so they sold it to me for a price I could afford.

    After a month or so of winter not so long after I bought the Fiat, I made like an engineer, reverse-engineered the starting system, found a minor design blunder, replace that part with one which resulted in my having no problems starting the car ever again. That particular, slightly re-engineered, Fiat 2100 gave me truly excellent service for more than twelve years.

  12. RE: Buddha Is Laughing, March 25, 2011 at 1:00 am

    Thus proving that Fiat’s come from the factory poorly engineered.

    ######################################

    As some engineers realize, the balancing of efficiency with economy results in everything engineered being poorly engineered because, in that sense, engineering is the art of successful (meaning done poorly) compromise.

    If it is worth doing, it is worth doing poorly, because nothing else is achievable.

    That is why there is need for repairs, and for those who understand repair work and are able to do it.

    That particular model of Fiat was designed to work well in the Italian climate, not the Chicago climate. I was using it outside of its proper design environment, so I repaired (redesigned and rebuilt) it for use in the environment in which I was using it, which was not the environment for which it was originally designed.

    Once that particular Fiat 2100 had been designed and built for the use I intended for it, it was quite elegant. It had exterior lighting that would meet present U.S. standards. It had a “collision proof” steering system that would not drive the steering column through a driver’s chest in any even slightly survivable collision. It had anchors for both lab and shoulder belts in the frame, and I outfitted it with full lap and shoulder belts when many U.S. cars came with neither such belts nor anchors for them. And, as a station wagon, it handled like a sports car. It also had “double-sided keys, so the keys worked either way, as American cars only much later had.

    Like everything people have ever made, improvements were possible.

    It is possible to design and build airplanes which will never crash. Those are the ones that are so well designed that they can never fly.

  13. Brian,

    People with a lot of education are smart….well…not all….you wonder how some got the piece of paper…..Bush is a prime example….nuff said there.

    I had a professor at UT when I first started out….that gave all of the students a piece of advice…..He said: Some of you are going to get a lot of education….some of you will not finish this school year….some of you are going to get the degree sought…..but what ever you do….If you can’t communicate with the audience that you are talking to…then all of the education is lost…..Think about that….

    You could have said what you said in one paragraph…..and we would have read it….I read it because I had nothing to really do and it was an uneventful commute….So, just words of advice….You want people to take what you say seriously….quit alienating them…so far you’ve done a great job in doing that…..

  14. Now I could have said what I said in one paragraph….

    Brian, You spout too much crap that people are not interested in. If you had said….I had a Fiat…rebuilt it for this climate…and it worked great….

    Thats all you had to say…

  15. I once spoke to a Ferrari mechanic who said it’s a good thing you’ve got to be wealthy to buy one because you need to buy two: one to drive while the other is in the shop.

    You left out Jaguar

  16. bdaman,

    Old Jaguars that was indeed the case. I was talking to a Jag mechanic back in the day (mid 80’s) and asked him what the best Jaguar to buy for dependability was and he told me “anything they’ve put an after-market small block Chevy motor in”. The newer models are a helluva lot more dependable than anything they built before the 90’s. Their QC when up quite a bit under Ford’s watch. And yes, the xkR-S is, as Artie Johnson used to say, “Veddy Interesting”. Plus it’s the sexiest car on the road next to an Aston-Martin One-77 (too hard to get worked on most places) and – of course – Ferraris of damn near any model (still a two-fer though).

  17. Right, in 1990 the year Ford purchased Jaguar they were last in the JD Powers CS survey. By 2000 they were #1 going from worst to first in ten years. The first Ford influence on the sedan came in 95 with the new XJ6 and the extended wheel base Van den plas. Then the XK8 which came out in 97 and then the XJ8 series for the sedans in 98. I’ve driven the XK8 and R at Road Atlanta in 97 and the sedan series at the Morroso Race Track in Palm Beach. I had a professional driver with me at all times and if you have never expirenced someone screaming brake while trying to wrestle the steering wheel from your control at 120 mph it’s quite harry.

    I have a 94 XJS coupe with the inline 4.0L 6 cylinder. That motor is bullet proof. You can google Buckman Bridge I-295. Starting on the West side of bridge I hit 140 as I hit crest the top :)

  18. and asked him what the best Jaguar to buy for dependability was and he told me “anything they’ve put an after-market small block Chevy motor in”

    Thats because in the older Jags they used a GM tranny and the small block would bolt right up. They also used GM’s AC components.

    The knock was Lucas electrical components. Because Jaguar was financially strapped they could only afford the B bin parts. Thats what Ford brought them was parts buying power. The 97 XK8 became the first Jaguar production car totally Lucas free. All electrical was supplied by Nipon Denso who provided Jaguar a single wire harness for the entire car.

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