34 thoughts on “Winning The Hearts, Minds, . . . and Paws

  1. Most people are dog like. However, the world is run in large part by the cat like. I love both! But I want a dog’s world being dominant and cats being the minority.

  2. This story reminded me of the pictures of my son when he was with the Marines in Afghanistan that showed the many dogs befriended by the Marines and soldiers. Great picture!

  3. “Most people are dog like. However, the world is run in large part by the cat like. I love both! But I want a dog’s world being dominant and cats being the minority.”

    Reverse anthropomorphism.

  4. i often wonder if we had replaced a military assault on Iraq with a Peace Corps action of the same magnitude whether results would have been much different around the world. It’s an unanswerable question since it didn’t happen that way, but i’m just not sold on the gun as answer to all troubles.

  5. Tom,

    Yes, but could a Peace Corps program have operated in either Iraq or Afghanistan?

    Why must we engage only for the sake of oil**, is the main question.

    Lastly, being kind to dogs. Are they well-treated when we are not there.

    A dog’s life does not equate with dog eat dog. The dog’s life is such where they are despised. And dog’s don’t eat dogs. Only humans do.

    **Ie all natural resources.

  6. When did we stop the Peace Corps. It was so cheap, compared to war, and so effective. It made Thailand a tourist land, from having been an exotic one. Ah yes, after we killed JFK and got the war train for profit back on track.

  7. ID, The Peace Corps lives. Nixon tried to marginalize it when he combined Vista and the Peace Corps into Action. However, it has always been active and has been quite active the last 15-20 years, w/ most projects being in Africa. I have a kid I coached just get back a few years ago from Africa, having worked on an AIDS prevention project.

    Darren, Great videos, thanks.

  8. On the Eighth Day God created Dog. His purpose was to put his likeness on Earth to take care of humans. Not just guide dogs for the blind but all dogs for most people. Now some humans dont like dogs. Those are the ones whom you should not hire to be cops or teachers. The test for those schmucks is to walk them through the dog kennel and see if the dogs growl at them.

  9. Jay: You dont rub the stomach of any RepubliCon. You dont pet em on the head. You dont listen if they bark. There is no such thing as a Republicon Dog.

  10. Some of you are seriously out of touch. The true way to their hearts and minds is not to bomb and kill their people. They are not even that much into dogs, except for shepard dogs for their work.

  11. They have mountains of assayed and proven rare earth metals used in high tech electronics, etc. China has also, but one source is too chancy, Keeping the Russians out, never mind the people there.

  12. If only the U. S. military would treat Muslims and anti-war protesters as well as they treat dogs.

    Although, in Vietnam we had a SEAL team detachment at our remote ATSB (Advanced Tactical Support Base) who had a German shepherd which they loved to set loose on other sailor’s pet dogs to kill them. So, how the U.S. military treats some dogs — and for what purposes they use their favorite ones — varies from country to country, protest movement to protest movement, and from home invasion to home invasion.

    A few pictures of the snarling curs terrifying anti-war protesters or cringing Muslm peasants at home in Iraq and Afghanistan would provide a somewhat more balanced picture here.

    Too bad the good professor did not see fit to provide any.

  13. Oh, and by the way: in Counter Insurgency School back in 1969 they taught us that the slogan “winning their hearts and minds” translated practically into a policy of “grab ’em by the balls and their hearts and minds will follow.” I sure would like to see one of our vaunted Visigoths grab an Iraqi or Afghan junkyard (what we have made of their countries) dog by the balls, expecting him to meekly follow orders, as our “professionals” do when commanded to commit crimes for which many of them will lose — if not take themselves — their own lives.

    The professor’s tireless vendetta against the U. S. Afghan puppet Hamid Karzai reminds me of a conversation one visiting American had with North Vietnam’s foreign minister, Pham Van Dong. The American asked why the North Vietnamese called the Saigon Government’s (name any one of them) “leaders” a puppet, when that corrupt and venal man consistently acted against America’s interests. “Oh, he’s a puppet alright,” said the foreign minster, “He’s just a bad puppet.”

    The U.S.government prefers puppets to popular local leaders, and so predictably gets the bad puppets U. S.policies create. The foreign puppets all know this and profit handsomely from their cynical knowledge of the American civilian and military “leadership.”

    I wish the good professor would turn his contempt for the puppet Hamid Karzai to the yearly parade of U. S. generals who keep promising to “make progress” at some point twenty years hence while failing at every task except propagandizing the American people who slavishly fund their inept careers and lavish retirements. Yet the “ticket punching” parade lurches ever onward, with no sign of learning by the U.S public whatsoever.

    It aids the understanding to keep in mind the universal image of the U.S puppeteer trapped and strangled by the strings its own bad puppet uses most skillfully against it. A few pictures of a few soldiers petting a few dogs absolutely tells us nothing of importance about where all the hundreds of billions of dollars — not to mention the human lives — vanish every year making a dog’s life out of once self-sufficient and competent foreign societies.

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