Resident or Inmate? Mayor Bloomberg Proposes Requirement to Fingerprint Those Residing in NYC Public Housing

Submitted by Darren Smith, Guest Blogger

Fingerprint ScannerAccording to CBS New York, New York’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg desires to reduce crime among the more than half million residents of the city’s housing districts. He is quoted as saying

“Five percent of our population lives in NYCHA housing, 20 percent of the crime is in NYCHA housing – numbers like that. And we’ve just got to find some way to keep bringing crime down there. And we have a whole group of police officers assigned to NYCHA housing,” Bloomberg said. “The people that live there, most of them, want more police protection. They want more people. If you have strangers walking in the halls of your apartment building, don’t you want somebody to stop and say, ‘Who are you, why are you here?’”

According to this proposal, keeping crime down would be successfully addressed by requiring all residents to submit to fingerprinting as a condition of residency. Supposedly, the fingerprint or other biometric data would be used for biometric access devices such as live fingerprint scanning devices mated with door locks. Yet, the centuries old method of using a key seems to work almost as well and so could perhaps an electronic RFID or magnetic stripe card device such as those used in many hotels. Is security the real goal or is it more nuanced?

Approximately 620,000 persons reside in NYC Housing Authority properties. One has to wonder about practicality in fingerprinting this many individuals, especially if a large portion of these residents are young children where fingerprinting is difficult. One could estimate if somehow this was manageable at even three minutes per set it would require. At 248 office days per year and an 8 hour workday it would take over 15 worker years to fingerprint the existing residents, assuming there was no turnover or births or additions or subtractions.

But what will be more startling to many would be the implication to civil liberties and perhaps the insult in the minds of a large percentage of the tenants this would foster. The proffered intent would be that by fingerprinting each of the tenants and merging that with the security system theoretically only those who have prints were on file would be allowed access into the building. But somehow Mayor Bloomberg believes having a fingerprint on file would allow someone in authority or a tenant to be able to see a person who does or does reside there and is walking down the halls, scan their fingerprints using their eyeballs, and then be able to verify that this person is a resident.

But if such a system is implemented, what is to be done with guests of tenants or for those wishing to contact the residents for any lawful purpose? And realistically how easy would it be to defeat this scheme? One nefarious resident simply opens the door and a phalanx of crooks marches in.

Practicalities aside, is it reasonable for those who through economic need reside in government housing blocks must submit to fingerprinting as is the case with those accused of crimes who are booked into jail while those who are of better means who rent or purchase their own residences not required?

NYC Housing Authority Police PatchBut we should also ask, what the true purpose of this is, if there is one. Is it really to screen people or manage who enter the building? Fingerprinting the entire population of NYC is not going to reduce crime by any significant amount. It does have a purpose in identification only. Fingerprints only show who a person is and that they were present at a location to leave a latent print on an object. If one or both of these elements is absent a fingerprint is useless. Yet, the identification potential has the ability to detect who is actually applying to be a resident; that is if their fingerprints are on file. The problem comes in the use of this data.

Some states prohibit children under a certain age from being fingerprinted for a criminal arrest and / or conviction. Would this proposed rule by a means of bypassing this? Some security cleared employment applicants are required to submit a finger print card, such as those in positions of responsibility, investment managers, government agents and the likes. These cards are then compared with a national database to determine identification and if these prints are matched to those latent prints that were taken from crime scenes. Haphazard data entry by negligent employees can lead to incidences where one set of prints might be mismatched to another person, resulting years later possibly in the wrong person being implicated for a crime due a latent print matching the wrong person mistakenly entered into the database. The location for these print cards are also identified, so those who have submitted fingerprints (if these prints are to be merged into the federal databases) by reason of being public housing applicants when a comparison is made for them later in life it can show that the purpose of this person’s fingerprinting was that they had applied for public housing. Would this lead to a discriminatory treatment of the person, or at least an unfavorable view by some people who might hold a prejudice? And do people have a right to simple be not included in a government database when they have not committed any crime and elected not to apply for a security clearance?

But what kind of society requires it’s most financially vulnerable to submit to the same fingerprinting as those booked into jail as a condition to reside in public housing? And, what if the potential resident elects to refuse to submit to these procedures? Do the children of a single parent have to rely on the charity of others, or be homeless because a parent chooses, for whatever reason they have, to not be printed? Are we also to accept that economically disadvantaged people are criminals by nature and therefore are subjected to a different set of rules for different strata of citizens?

Source CBS New York

55 thoughts on “Resident or Inmate? Mayor Bloomberg Proposes Requirement to Fingerprint Those Residing in NYC Public Housing

  1. The legacy of mayor Bloomberg will be a legacy of the deterioration of civil rights in the city and a plundering of the City’s treasury and land by developers who trash each and every neighborhood while snatching every tax benefit and public grant they can. His forays in public health, gun control and gay rights were nothing more than window dressing to distract residents from almost mega maniacal desire to prove just how much power he has and that no one can question him on how he will use it.

    He is a dictator waiting to happen!

  2. What a bargain: a Mayor with $1.00/year salary!!!
    His affection towards his citizens is over-pouring!

    He should buy, and we’ll be happy to sell him, one more term as a Mayor of NY. Term limits are for poor people who are lazy and incompetent. They sure need a ‘Benito’ father!

    God, please have mercy on US.

  3. And I thought Rudy Giuliani was a miserable thug. Mike Bloomberg keeps showing a dictatorial streak that is belied by his mild manner. I spent many years dealing with tenants of NYC’s projects. They were underfunded, badly conceived high rise structures that suffered from constant neglect. Bloomberg has transformed a City I love into a playground for his wealthy peers. To him it seems the rest of its citizens are either servants, or riff-raff.

  4. Darren, I believe that your reference to criminalizing the poor fits the bill here, although Bloomberg appears capable of providing a benignly despotic explanation for whatever he proposes. This is on a level with mandatory drug testing of welfare applicants and prohibiting food stamp recipients from buying lottery tickets.

  5. Is there anybody left in NYC who make less than $500,000 that still respects the mayor?

    Will somebody please tell the mayor that bond salesmen are not the only players who have game. Any street hustler who cannot figure out how to talk his way into a building has already starved to death. The rest of them aren’t going to be slowed down by a biometric scanner.

    Once inside it is easy enough to jam most locks with Kleenex, toilet paper, newspaper, a dollar bill will usually work.

    The last time I had any contact with public housing the challenge was to keep the locks in working order, let alone maintain biometric scanners.

    Maybe the mayor should try to fix some of the low tech, unglamorous problems first – like keeping locks fixed and unjammed, and strangers from following residents into the buildings.

    I doubt this proposal will do much for safety. But some good might come from it if there is a significant set aside to hire fingerprint technicians and scanner maintenance workers from the projects.

  6. One nefarious politician simply opens the door and a phalanx of crooks marches in. The pi…uh, “cops” will want to use it to track people who have not committed crimes, a warrantless means of monitoring people.

    You can bet the farm the monitoring won’t be limited to who enters but when, and other government agencies want it as well. It’s almost certain that welfare offices want it to snoop on people and “prove” fraud or accuse people who haven’t committed fraud. .

    Tenant: “I went home for lunch after my 10am job interview.”

    Bureaucrat teabagger: “No you didn’t! You watched TV all day!”

    If the system only monitors when people enter, not when they leave, that is a real possibility.

    And who else can buy and access that information? Salesmen? Debt collectors? Private investigators? I’ll bet such scum will also be allowed into the building, their fingerprints “approved” for entry. Tenants will be controlled, while filth will have the run of the place.

  7. Too tired to offer a defense of Mayor Bloomberg and Rudolph Giuliani. But, just so there’s at least one positive remark on this thread: Guys like Mayor Bloomberg, Rudolph Giuliani, William Bratton, and James Q. Wilson–what a great bunch of guys.

  8. It must be very frustrating to be Michael Bloomberg and have ALL the answers, and run into such resistance in their implementation on such trivial grounds as civil liberties.

  9. Reminds me of the Big Bang Theory, the guys are stumped by security, but a girl scout selling cookies just goes up and swipes all the call buttons and gets buzzed into the building….LoL…

  10. Another example of our ongoing policy at every level of government…

    “You should be afraid, very afraid, and we are there to protect you.”

  11. Darren thanks for writing about this. NYC is where GS works hand in hand with local/state/federal authorities to protect wall street. They used facial recognition from their HQ during OWS. GS employees and other private contractors move in and out of that HQ as if they own it, which I’m sure they largely do!

    I agree with Mike A. that this is part of the criminalization of being poor but I believe it is also one more attempt to surveil and control this population. It’s a co-ordinated effort by private contractors, and all levels of govt. It’s also very profitable. NY is very important to them because they are afraid there will be another OWS. They forced OWS marchers to take retinal scans. After fingerprints, these will be next. We are in a police state.

  12. “They want more people. If you have strangers walking in the halls of your apartment building, don’t you want somebody to stop and say, ‘Who are you, why are you here?’”

    Am I the only one who, when they read this line, yelled out loud, “No! No, I don’t want someone stopping people for the crime of being a stranger!”

    It’s amazing that NYC and San Francisco, two supposed bastions of liberalism, have produced such virulent attackers of civil liberties.

  13. All this is easy to say for a guy who has always lived his life behind a security net second only to the US Secret Service. He has only the vaguest clue about the poor. He is an authoritarian personality with deep-seated need for control. He is not in this job for the money or even public service for the people. He is an oligarch, needing power and control to satisfy his psychological needs. If there is a public service side to him, it is to be of service to his own ilk, and not to the 99%.

    As Dr. Roy Grinker wrote years ago, the super rich are different from the rest of us, and cannot relate on almost any dimension to people who are not wealthy like them.

    You might have guessed by now that Mayor Bloomberg is not on my holiday card mailing list.

  14. Bloomberg says: Five percent of our population lives in NYCHA housing, 20 percent of the crime is in NYCHA housing – numbers like that. And we’ve just got to find some way to keep bringing crime down there.

    Crime is primarily caused by existential desperation. If 20% of the crime is in NYCHA housing, that is probably because it is a hot spot for desperation and therefore a source of crime. Reducing crime there will only cause the desperate to look for easier victims elsewhere, it will not reduce the overall crime rate.

    Although some crime is committed by sociopaths and psychopaths (atypical psychologies), the typical psychology commits crime because they cannot survive otherwise. Crime rises with economic trouble, and falls during times of prosperity (not to zero, but it falls significantly).

    The same goes for drug abuse; drug abuse provides a temporary release from an otherwise bleak and miserable existence in poverty that despite one’s efforts they could not escape. That becomes addictive, and the addicted turn to crime to pay for their escape; because drugs are illegal, this encourages others to deal drugs and make money as their escape from poverty.

    The way to reduce crime in NYCHA properties, and throughout the city, is to break the trap of poverty, provide clear ways out and assistance so those forced to live there do not lose hope and get so desperate they feel abandoned by society, and victimized by society, and because of that feel they might as well treat the rest of society as it has treated them: Disposable, expendable, and exploitable.

    Having a cop on every street corner is not going to help. Pay anybody in NYCHA that is willing minimum wage to go to school full time and pass their classes, that will help. Whether their current achievement level is first grade or Master’s student, whether the classes are in reading and arithmetic or theoretical physics or trade school A/C repair or big rig driving, make learning one of the full-time minimum wage jobs available to anybody over the age of 15, and watch crime evaporate.

    Because existential despair will evaporate. A route out that only requires work and a manageable level of sacrifice will exist, and because they will (on average) learn to do something that pays two or three times minimum wage, within a few years, they will leave class system and contribute more to society through a productive effort, instead of a destructive one. It will be an investment that betters our economic productivity, and an “investment” because they will more than pay it back (through their greater volume of taxes paid at their higher salary for their working career) all the money society invested in their education, and saving their life.

    Not everybody will take the opportunity, not everybody will finish it, but many will.

    Check out this article, Why Drug Dealers Live With Their Moms.

    The short answer is: Because the typical drug dealer earns less than half of minimum wage ($3.30 / hr), and this is the only job they can get.

    Venkatesh is the academic that conducted and analyzed the field work described in this article. In his paper he describes when a minimum wage entry level job opened up at the local McDonald’s, the line of applicants (for one job) wrapped around the block.

    If they are willing to stand behind a counter doing that 8 hours a day for minimum wage, most of them would be willing to learn a trade for 8 hours a day for minimum wage.

    The cause of crime is chronic poverty producing desperation. The cause of drug abuse and drug dealing is chronic poverty producing desperation. To reduce crime, reduce chronic poverty, and thereby desperation.

  15. My only knowledge of this is the above article. Mayor Bloomberg said that 20% of the crime is in public housing. That sounds pretty bad. One’s home is supposed to be where you rest and recuperate from stress. However, you could infer from that statistic that public housing is probably one of the greatest sources of stress in the residents’ lives. That means for them, there’s less mental, emotional and physical wherewithal left over to do all the things you have to do to carry out daily life. Even more so if they become crime victims and the source of their stress is more than just crime avoidance.

    My first reaction to this isn’t that it’s criminalization of the poor; rather, it refuses to surrender to the idea that, just because people are poor, they have less desire to live in a crime-free building and neighborhood, or that the government shouldn’t try to help them do so. To live free of violence is a universal human need. I once lived in a poor neighborhood. I feared for my physical safety many times. Why wouldn’t I have been entitled to the government’s public safety efforts just because I didn’t have a lot of money? Should the government have just given me up to the people who would have harmed me?

  16. Vestal Virgin: “Why wouldn’t I have been entitled to the government’s public safety efforts just because I didn’t have a lot of money?” That’s a good question. As Darren showed, fingerprinting everyone in the housing complex will not lower crime. It will make some private contractor a lot of money and give the govt. information it is not entitled to have.

    So why not provide security and safety to people who are poor. People should not have to live with crime. That is why most of our political and industry elites should be in prison. After all they have committed dozens of serious crimes with no consequences coming to them at all. We should not tolerate that as a society nor should we tolerate crime directed specifically against people who are poor.

    Bruce, since you seem to think being poor is criminal, do you also wish to hold account high level, extraordinarily wealthy and powerful individuals who commit war and financial crimes? Or, are they not to be inconvenienced by adhering to the rule of law?

  17. Jason: Am I the only one who, when they read this line, yelled out loud, “No! No, I don’t want someone stopping people for the crime of being a stranger!”

    I agree. My reaction on reading that line was to flip it: I am a stranger to almost everyone I meet, and the act of walking or standing in a public hallway or on a public street in in a public place of business is not a crime, and I do not want to be challenged thirty times a day with aggressive suspicion demanding I prove who I am and what I am doing (or presumably being forced to leave). It is a free country. I am entitled to some privacy in my thinking and motivations.

    Besides, if I am a stranger to them, they are a stranger to me: Why should I answer them until they answer me, who are they and what are they doing questioning me?

    It is a free country, strangers have the right to go about their business in privacy, and until they commit a crime we just have to accept that some things are none of our business. If we think that increases our risk of crime, that is the price of freedom, and its a bargain because the price of totalitarianism would be much higher.

  18. Another example of how the United States is becoming more and more a Minority Report-like nation? Hitler and his Reich members would be in awe of Mayor Bloomberg and his idea on fingerprinting the residents of New York’s housing projects. Indeed, if only such technology would have allowed Hitler, Himmler, Heydrich, Goebbels, Goring, Bormann, et al, to catalogue and monitor Europe’s Jews. Imagine the efficiency Hitler and his thugs would have been able to exercise in carrying out their monstrous deeds. Implicit in Bloomberg’s idea: the poor are prone to criminal deviancy, therefore they should be monitored. Not the assholes on Wall Street who helped steer this country into a ditch in 2008.

  19. Why not just have residents of public housing wear badges on their clothing so they can be easily identified wherever they go in the city? Hitler had some good ideas, you know, Mayor Bloomberg!

  20. “Jason: Am I the only one who, when they read this line, yelled out loud, “No! No, I don’t want someone stopping people for the crime of being a stranger!”

    I agree. My reaction on reading that line was to flip it: I am a stranger to almost everyone I meet, and the act of walking or standing in a public hallway or on a public street in in a public place of business is not a crime, and I do not want to be challenged thirty times a day with aggressive suspicion demanding I prove who I am and what I am doing”

    Jason and Tony C.,

    It is chillingly ironic that both in NAZI Germany and in the USSR people were exhorted to spy on their neighbors actions with fear as the basis for the need to spy. Spying on ones neighbor and reporting their behavior was considered good citizenship. Since the Patriot Act we hear similar exhortations, such as look at “suspicious” people all around you and report them if afraid. Is this the lives we really want to lead and is this the America we really want? A land driven by fear and suspicion? Apparently this is the mindset of Mike Bloomberg, whose suspicions run rampant for those not of his social class.

  21. @tonyc: You said:

    If they are willing to stand behind a counter doing that 8 hours a day for minimum wage, most of them would be willing to learn a trade for 8 hours a day for minimum wage.

    Overall, I agree with you, and decent jobs would solve a whole lot of the problems. Which is why we probably need import tariffs and NAFTA in the trash can. But there are a lot of people you couldn’t give a decent paying job to. And its not just a lot poor black dudes, its middle class white boys, too. In their late teens and 20’s.

    As long as they have enough money to buy hamburgers or pizza, and enough for beer/pot/Xanax/oxy/meth/whatever, then they are happy. $3.30/hour is enough for them to get by on, particularly if they can sponge off their family or some dumb chick to keep the electricity bill paid so the X-box will work. They are drug dealers to save money. They buy 100 pills, and sell 80 of them at a profit to pay for the 100+, and use the other 20 pills for themselves. They pilfer and steal whenever possible for extra cash. They might get a job from time to time when they need extra cash to buy new tires, or when they move to some new enablers house, under the pretense they are going to help pay the bills. The jobs seem to last long enough to qualify for unemployment. If you have teenage kids, you have probably had some of these people in your home without really knowing what they are. And you have probably come up wondering whatever happened to my ______, because you could just swear you put it back in the drawer when you were through with it???

    I would GUESS that public housing projects of full of these kind of losers, who make life miserable for everybody around them. It will take more than jobs to fix that.

    Squeeky Fromm
    Girl Reporter

  22. “Crime is primarily caused by existential desperation. If 20% of the crime is in NYCHA housing, that is probably because it is a hot spot for desperation and therefore a source of crime. Reducing crime there will only cause the desperate to look for easier victims elsewhere, it will not reduce the overall crime rate.”

    Tony C.,

    You’re on the money. Let’s look briefly back at the history of the NYCHA and the man who is most responsible Robert Moses:

    “NYCHA was created in 1934. At the end of 1935, NYCHA dedicated its first development, called First Houses, located on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. The Authority boomed in partnership with Robert Moses after World War II as a part of Moses’ plan to clear old tenements and remake New York as a modern city. Moses indicated later in life that he was disappointed at how the public housing system fell into decline and disrepair. Originally intended for working families, the projects increasingly became occupied by low-income families, many of whom had no working adult.[citation needed] The majority of NYCHA developments were built between 1945 and 1965. Unlike most cities, New York depended heavily on city and state funds to build its housing, rather than just the federal government. Most of the postwar developments had over 1000 apartment units each, and most were built in the modernist, tower-in-the-park style popular at the time.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_Housing_Authority

    Moses was a wealthy NYC aristocrat who publicly had disdain for poor people, particularly people of color and ethnic minorities. This Wiki article has a few problems, but can give you an idea of the man, his power and his disdain for the “lower classes” particularly Blacks. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Moses. The definitive biography of Moses is “The Power Broker” by historian Robert Caro. It is a long, detailed book (1,000+ pages) that really gave me my first understanding of NY politics and politics in general. Moses interest in the projects was more of the “urban renewal” variety which really meant reclaiming potentially strategic land for the use of the rich. He developed Jones Beach on Long Island (one of the world’s longest and most beautiful beaches) and then ensured that there was no public transportation available to get there, thus eliminating the poor. Some of the most substantial overpass bridges in the world are located on the Southern State, Meadowbrook and Wantagh State Parkways which are the access to the Jones beach complex. The bridges were purposely built with low clearances so that buses could never use these parkways to access Jones Beach. No rail service to Jones Beach is available either. This was the Moses mentality.

    Back to the projects, over which after WWII, Moses had great power. As the quote says almost all of these project building were 1,000 apartment towers running about 15 stories. They were built in areas of the City that were considered less desirable and in many instances they were not built close to convenient public transportation. Their design is of a depressingly utilitarian brick and except for that they lack color or style. Experiments have shown that when humans are overcrowded, that overcrowding in and of itself leads to the desperation and despair Tony alludes to. It also must be understood that this housing while ostensibly to benefit those with lower incomes also served to segregate them from the wealthier classes and even the middle class.

    NYC has five Boroughs (counties really). Of the top five counties in the US, three of the five are NYC Boroughs. Number one is Manhattan, Number three is Brooklyn and number four is Queens. While under Giuliani and Bloomberg Manhattan receives the most attention the urbanization of these two other Boroughs has forced those of lesser income to relocate. For instance I couldn’t afford to live in NYC (my beloved home town) and had to move to Florida where real estate/rentals was cheaper. By definition people who live in NYCHA projects can’t afford to move anywhere and thus are trapped into housing which by its nature breeds despair. The reality too, is that with the budget constraints imposed by various tax advantages to the wealthy in NY, Mayors like Bloomberg and Giuliani failed to maintain NYCHA housing properly. I have seen so many instances where the one elevator in a fifteen floor hi-rise project has remained broken for months on end.

    It is quite easy these days, having had a senile actor as President beginning the cycle, to blame the impoverished for being in that State. Then too for our Country’s shrinking middle class the idea of slipping back into the great unwashed masses is terrifying and so they find themselves comforted by the idea that those suffering are the cause of their own misery. The same mass of people so frightened of their own potential to fall into impoverishment, become willing to believe that the problems like crime, which are direct results of poverty, can be solved by further oppression by government. People like Bloomberg, who is purported to fly to his home in Bermuda most weekends, offering draconian solutions only affecting those alienated from society seem like heroes battling the “barbarians.” That this mild mannered billionaire is far more barbaric than his appearance, seems hard to believe, yet it is sadly true. He is a truly disgusting man, who in current NY circles, is only a hairsbreadth away from being Donald Trump politically.
    .

  23. “NYC has five Boroughs (counties really). Of the top five counties in the US, three of the five are NYC Boroughs. Number one is Manhattan, Number three is Brooklyn and number four is Queens.”

    What I neglected to mention was that I was talking in terms of housing and rental costs.

  24. Bruce-
    “Well at least N.Y. isn’t leading the nation in murder per capita like Chicago.”

    Chicago and NYC are at or near the top in total murders. However, neither is even in the top ten per capita.

  25. What Mike A. said. The next thing Mayor Big Pockets will be requesting is a debtors prison because if they are poor they must not be allowed to partake in the American dream. If Mayor Bloomberg was walking in one of these buildings without his finger prints being on record, should the residents be afraid of him?? The answer is Yes.

  26. Off Topic:

    Ray Kelly On Stop And Frisk: ‘No Question’ Violent Crime Will Rise If Program Is Stopped
    By Amanda Terkel
    Posted: 08/18/2013
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/18/ray-kelly-stop-and-frisk_n_3776035.html

    Excerpt:
    WASHINGTON — New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly vigorously defended the city’s stop-and-frisk policies on Sunday, predicting trouble if they are stopped.

    “No question about it, violent crime will go up,” Kelly responded when asked by NBC “Meet the Press” host David Gregory whether “people will die” if stop and frisk is abandoned.

    “This is something that’s integral to policing. This happens throughout America in any police jurisdiction. You have to do it,” he added. “Officers have to have the right of inquiry if they see some suspicious behavior. So I can assure you, this is not just a New York City issue, it’s an issue throughout America. And this case has to be appealed, in my judgment, because it will be taken as a template and have significant impact in policing throughout America.”

  27. Squeeker: As usual, you only agree to dilute your agreement into actual disagreement, and then reassert your stereotypes. 98% of people born are naturally inclined to empathy, caring, and charity. Just because you aren’t one of them, do not make the mistake of thinking everybody else is a sociopath like you.

    People drop out of school, commit crimes, get addicted to drugs and deal drugs almost entirely out of desperation and an attempt to escape what seems an inevitable lifetime of second-class citizenship, deprivation, a struggle to survive and not mattering at all. Just as you treat them. When you treat somebody that way, they rebel. If following the rules leaves them phucked for life, expect humans of any color or religion to stop following the rules, because their life is already ruined, once their rationality asserts itself in the teens and that becomes internalized, they will conclude they might as well bet their life on any slim chance of escape they can find: Including becoming a brutal criminal.

    You, and the sociopaths and bigots and morons that think like you, are essentially the cause of crime.

  28. Tony C: Spot on. Why else would someone choose the nom de plume of a failed presidential assassin and member of the Charles Manson family?

  29. Just like drug testing for welfare, this is just another band-aid for a problem that needs surgery. Instead of violating people’s fourth amendment rights, how about getting rid of the public housing and welfare and instead let private charities take over?

  30. @tonyc: You said, “You, and the sociopaths and bigots and morons that think like you, are essentially the cause of crime.”

    No. The criminals are the main cause of crime. Poverty and a lousy family life make it far worse and far more likely. You have already identified some people as “sociopaths.” Goodness, is it poverty which makes a Wall Street bond daddy screw the heck out of his customers? Or is it greed and a predatory personality? Do you think those traits are restricted to rich white folks?

    For heavens sake, use your frigging head for something besides knocking on doors. There has been crime in every society that has ever existed, and every society has had to have rules and punishments because some people just plain won’t behave themselves.

    But, test your ignorant CONCLUSIONS! Go to your local public housing project on a Friday and Saturday night and tell the boyz there how empathetic you are! Bring them some Skittles and Tea. Tell me how that works out for you.

    Squeeky Fromm
    Girl Reporter

  31. “Go to your local public housing project on a Friday and Saturday night and tell the boyz there how empathetic you are! Bring them some Skittles and Tea. Tell me how that works out for you”

    You have used pretty close to that line before so you must think it is informative and compelling.

    I lived for more than a decade in DC’s tragically afflicted Shaw neighborhood only blocks from what I later learned was the real Talley’s corner.

    Once I walked by the scene of a drive by shooting with blood and bodies still in the street. There were many months where, so far as I knew, I was the only white resident for many, many blocks. Over all, in all that time I was treated with more courtesy and genuine interest than in the other bedroom neighborhoods of Maryland and Northern Virginia where I lived before and after.

    One never knows where crime will occur – just ask the elites barricaded in their gated neighborhoods of northern Virginia.

    But the worst I ever encountered was an adolescent male who taunted from his front porch ‘yo in the hood now’. Little did he realize.

    The hypotheticals you cite may convince you but they strike a false note to me – a virgin writing pornography comes to mind.

  32. @bigfatmike:

    I do think the line is informative and telling because so many white liberals are remote from the problems they create. They live in a fantasy world where it is still 1963, and the Klan is burning crosses. And black criminals are just robbing and stealing to buy food. That is why I encourage them to visit their local poor black neighborhood at night, and get a better perspective. Maybe even put their own kids into some predominantly black schools. Those who whine about the roots of crime should actually talk to some poor black criminals. I have when I work with my BFF Fabia Sheen, Esq., an attorney. I have also talked to their families. I am not an expert, but I can tell you it is going to take a whole lot more than some “extra funding” to fix this crap.

    Squeeky Fromm
    Girl Reporter

  33. “.“No question about it, violent crime will go up,” Kelly responded ”

    Murder and violent crime rates have been declining in NYC since 1990 when there were 2045 murders. By 2000 the number of annual murders had declined to fewer than 700.

    The decline in the rate of murders and violent crimes in NYC trended down with murders and violent crimes in nine other major metropolitan areas and over the nation as a whole. That trend which began in 1990 for NYC and in the early 1990’s for other areas continues to this day.

    The decline in crime in NYC correlates far better with the decline in those other nine metro areas than it does with the number of stops from the ‘stop and frisk’ policy.

    There is no indication that crime rates in nine other metro area or the US as a whole are about to begin increasing. No evidence at all, none, none what so ever.

    To agree with Commissioner Kelly you have to believe that after 20 years of trending with nine major metro areas and the US as a whole, NYC will now go against trend and start increasing.

    There is no evidence to suggest that crime rates in NYC are about to break trend and move differently from the other nine major metro areas or the US. No evidence at all, none what so ever.

    Commissioner Kelly’s faith in ‘stop and frisk’ reflects the triumph of hope and raw ambition over the cruel reality of data.

  34. Squeeky,

    You bigoted twit. I’ve been to housing projects on both Friday, Saturday and Sunday nights alone, in fact some of the most notorious ones in NYC.
    I’m still here and I’ve never been attacked. Squeeky your fears are just a mixture of your racism convoluted with repressed sexual fantasy’s of being violated by Black men which I presume is your chief masturbatory fantasy.

  35. @MikeS:

    Good for you! You can tell all your buds to turn off their Avoid The Ghetto apps, and head out to the ‘hood for fun and games! With your endorsement, I bet they will be sooo eager for new experiences! I can hardly wait to hear about it!

    Squeeky Fromm
    Girl Reporter

  36. Squeeker: The criminals are the main cause of crime.

    No, criminals commit the crimes, and make the choice to commit a crime, but that does not amount to a “cause.” Why do they make such choices? Because the “choice” they are confronted with is not really a choice at all, it is coercion by desperation.

    In the movie the Godfather, a man holds a gun to a victim’s head and tells him, “Either your signature will be on this contract, or your brains will.”

    Is that a “choice?” Your money or your life? Is a coerced “choice” any real kind of choice at all, or is it just slavery in disguise?

    Squeeker asks: Is it poverty which makes a Wall Street bond daddy screw the heck out of his customers?

    You are right about that, it is greed, by sociopaths (or effective sociopaths if not clinical ones). But I did not say 100% of crime is caused by desperation, some crime is caused by atypical psychologies (sociopaths, psychopaths, insatiable greed or other personality disorders), but those are about 2% of people committing crimes for non-survival reasons.

    When poverty and desperation are involved, the majority of people with typical psychologies are committing crimes for survival reasons and would not commit those crimes if they could join the middle class and work a non-criminal job for $30K or $40K a year and raise their kids with hope.

    Squeeker says: Do you think those traits are restricted to rich white folks? […] Go to your local public housing project on a Friday and Saturday night …

    I grew up in that neighborhood, you racist dolt.

    And I do not recommend anybody return. Once desperation, poverty, anger and resentment has driven an individual to a life of crime, violence, and coercion of others, it has also erected, for their own psychological protection, mental barriers that prevent them from feeling empathy or sympathy for strangers, and often for anybody but a select few brothers in arms.

    I think there is a significant difference between becoming a criminal out of desperation and as a matter of survival, and becoming a criminal out of simple greed for money.

    I do not argue the crimes are less punishable, in fact the crimes of desperate are often more horrific (murder, mutilation, arson, extortion, sexual slavery, drive-by shootings) than the financial white collar crimes of embezzlement and fraud.

    The difference is that the crimes of the desperate did not have to be. We inflict those criminals upon ourselves. I do not know how to fix a person that grows up wealthy, is educated in the Ivy League, never wants for food, shelter, entertainment or luxury, and decides to embezzle and defraud others anyway. Whatever is wrong with them is not correctable in any systematic way.

    But I DO know many ways to address desperation and poverty and inequality, in a systematic way, in a fair way that isn’t just a handout, in a way that pays people for making a contribution to the welfare of the rest of us, exactly as my own jobs (and businesses) have paid me, in various ways throughout my life, to make the world a better and smarter place.

  37. Bloomberg is a compulsive controller, a tyrant. It seems strange how the more liberal the govt. becomes the less freedom ensues, but there it is.

  38. Government benefit, government rules.

    To quote:

    “A government big enough to give you everything you want is powerful enough to take everything you have.”

    – Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

  39. Barry: Government benefit, government rules.

    That statement implies the government is different than the people, and it should not be, it should be an instrument of the people’s collective will and nothing more.

    So sure, if collectively the people provide a benefit to their less fortunate members, those benefits can have conditions and requirements, but that does not mean the government impairs their freedom in any way. No more than my credit card company “rules me” or impairs my freedom by requiring I pay them back for the money they expend to merchants on my behalf when I use their card.

    As for the Jefferson quote, who said we want a government big enough to give us everything we want?

    Or “give us” anything? I want a government to provide services mandated by the people and nothing more. I want military and police protections, I want protections against fraud, against coercion, subjugation and extortion.

    This quote is mis-applied when it is used to imply the government cannot provide us anything we want, or that the government cannot be big enough to address systemic poverty, hunger, homelessness or lack of education or job skills or safety without over-stepping its bounds.

    Jefferson’s statement may sound alarming, but it does not prove itself and he provides no evidence it has to be true. In fact, logic tells us it isn’t true; the power to provide something is not the power to take something. Walmart is big and has the power to provide me plenty, but no power to arbitrarily take anything of mine without my permission. As big as they are, I still have to agree to any transaction between me and Walmart. The idea that there is no form of government that can be restrained by the people is just false.

    Besides, people do not want the government to give them everything.

    What people typically want, all over the world, is a fair and level playing field where they are not exploited, subjugated, coerced, robbed or defrauded and can succeed in life by working 40 hours a week or so.

    That is not the government giving them everything they want, they are willing to work, most are willing to work for about 90% of their adulthood. What they need from the government is an environment in which work works as a formula for success in life.

  40. Darren,

    I didn’t know if you had seen this story:

    Upper West Side condo has separate entrances for rich and poor
    By KATE BRIQUELET
    Last Updated: 12:20 PM, August 18, 2013
    http://www.nypost.com/p/news/local/manhattan/class_doorfare_ZIEobiEylc8G1uQAcLZn1O

    Excerpt:
    This is rich!

    The poor will use a separate door under plans for a new Upper West Side luxury tower — where affordable housing will be segregated from ritzy waterfront condos despite being in the same building.

    Manhattan developer Extell is seeking millions in air rights and tax breaks for building 55 low-income units at 40 Riverside Boulevard, but the company is sequestering the cash-poor tenants who make the lucrative incentives possible.

    Five floors of affordable housing will face away from the Hudson River and have a separate entrance, elevator and maintenance company, while 219 market-rate condominiums will overlook the waterfront.

    “You know that show ‘Downton Abbey’? Where the servants have to come and go through separate entrances and bow their heads when they see a noble?” wrote the author behind the blog West Side Rag. “Well, there could soon be a version right here on the Upper West Side!”

    Extell broke ground on the building between West 61st and West 62nd streets last year as part of the 15-tower Riverside South residential complex stretching to West 72nd Street.

    Now the company is applying for the city’s Inclusionary Housing Program, which gives developers more floor area in exchange for building on- or off-site affordable housing.

    But instead of building a larger condo, Extell plans to sell the bonus floor area to another building within a half-mile of the site. Real-estate attorneys say such a sale could be worth millions.

    Extell is also seeking a controversial 421a exemption — a tax break given to developers who include affordable housing in their market-rate buildings.

    In October, The Post reported that five of the luxury firm’s towers cost the city $21.8 million in tax revenue in their first year alone.

  41. “Bloomberg is a compulsive controller, a tyrant. It seems strange how the more liberal the govt. becomes the less freedom ensues, but there it is.”

    Joy,

    You read but you do not comprehend. Bloomberg is to the right of his predecessor Giuliani, but because he favors some social issues like Gay rights and gun control he ran claiming to be a moderate. This was needed to get elected in NYC. He is a fiscal conservative of the most radical type and a “moral” tyrant.

  42. Michael Bloomberg–a man who wears a political coat of many colors :

    “A Democrat before seeking elective office, Bloomberg switched his party registration in 2001 to run for mayor as a Republican. He defeated opponent Mark Green in a close election held just weeks after the September 11 terrorist attacks. Bloomberg won a second term in 2005 and left the Republican Party two years later.[4] He campaigned to change the city’s term limits law in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and was elected to his third term in 2009 as an independent candidate on the Republican ballot line.”

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Bloomberg

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