California Lawyer Turns On Wife In Bizarre False Imprisonment Case

We previously discussed the case of Kent and Jill Easter, two California lawyers arrested for allegedly planting drugs in the car of a nemesis on the PTA board. The case has turned even more bizarre with Kent Easter blaming Jill Easter for the crime. The couple is separated and, after the arrest, Kent Easter learned that his wife was involved in an affair.


The charge is a novel one. They are charged with false imprisonment in the scheme to have Kelli Peters arrested on drug charges. Kent Easter, 40, called police to report Peters as driving erratically and carrying drugs in her back seat. Jill Easter, 40, is accused of planting bags with marijuana, a used marijuana pipe, Vicodin and Percocet. She has already pleaded guilty to false imprisonment. The Easters were upset with Peters over the treatment of their son at his elementary school. They sued Peters for falsely imprisoned their son and intentionally inflicting emotional distress by locking him out of the school building after a tennis class.

Kent Easter now claims that he was sick on February 16, 2001 during the planting of the drugs and that he was basically bullied into calling the police by his more dominant wife. It is the ultimate wimp defense. His attorney insisted “Kent Easter was a trusting husband, what he wasn’t was a standup to his wife . . . a good human being who didn’t have a backbone against his wife, she wore the pants in the family.”

Kent Easter insists that he was largely unaware of the plot as well as his wife’s affair. However, he used a false name and called from a public phone to implicate Peters. Moreover, records show him repeatedly calling and texting his wife during the critical period.

Kelli Peters, who went on to become president of the local PTA chapter, is now suing (with her husband and child) the Easters. Even though she was only briefly detained, Kelli Peters claims that she lives in fear of being falsely arrested again. She has obviously strong claims on intentional infliction of emotional distress and other torts. The fear of future false arrests may not resonate with the jury but the Easters have succeeded in triggering criminal and civil liability that will haunt them (and their son) for many years to come.

The combination of the conspiracy to file a false police report with false imprisonment is clearly designed to increase the sentencing range for the couple. Citizens are generally protected in making police reports, but to do so with knowledge of the falsity can be used to defeat immunity arguments.

Jill Easter has been sentenced to one year in prison with all but 120 days stayed, followed by three years of probation, and 100 hours of community service. She wisely allowed her law license to lapse.

Source: LA Now

17 thoughts on “California Lawyer Turns On Wife In Bizarre False Imprisonment Case

  1. I don’t understand Kent’s LEGAL defense. What’s the legal theory that allows you to get off based on your being brow beaten into committing a crime because you lack a backbone to just say “no”? If the judge and jury buys the story, perhaps you might get a lesser sentence, but it doesn’t sound like a legal defense to the charge at all.

  2. WHY ISLAM IS BEING ENCOURAGED IN EUROPE & AMERICA:

    WOMEN ARE UNINTELLIGENT & INFERIOR TO MEN

    “naqisatan ‘aqlan wa dinan” (deficient in intelligence and religion)

    “If a woman offered one of her breasts to be cooked and the other to be roasted, she still will fall short of fulfilling her obligations to her husband. And besides that if she disobeys her husband even for a twinkling of an eye, she would be thrown in the lowest part of Hell, except she repents and turns back.”

    (Tuffaha, Ahmad Zaky, Al-Mar’ah wal- Islam, Dar al-Kitab al-Lubnani, Beirut, first edition, 1985, p. 176. It is also quoted in Al-Musanaf by Abu Bakr Ahmad Ibn ‘Abd Allah Ibn Mousa Al-Kanadi who lived 557H., vol. 1 part 2, p. 255).

    “If blood, suppuration, and pus, were to pour from the husband’s nose and the wife licked it with her tongue, she would still never be able to fulfil his rights over her.”

    (Suyuti, commenting on Q. 4:34).

    It must be recognized that not every Muslim, nor every Muslim nation follows all of these teachings. These teachings come from both the Qur’an and the Hadith.

    The Hadith is ‘The Tradition of Mohammad’, that is, the stories of Mohammad’s deeds and sayings. This Hadith is of,

    “Paramount importance side by side with the Qur’an in the formation of the religious life of a human being and for the attainment of perfection. Indeed a Qur’an minus Hadith remains unintelligible in many cases in the work- a-day life of a man.”[1]

    The commentator Jalal-ud-Din as-Suyouti said that the Hadith “is the commentary on the Qur’an and its explanation”[2] This is why almost all commentaries rely in the first place on the Hadith to explain the Qur’an.

    The authentic Hadith is believed to be:

    “nothing short of revelation, [for the Qur’an says of Mohammad] “he does not speak out of low desires. It is not but inspiration which is inspired (Q. 53:3-4).” The only difference between the Qur’an and the Hadith is that whereas the former was revealed directly through Gabriel with the very letters that are embodied from Allah, the latter was revealed without letters and words.”[3]

    “Thus, next to the Holy Qur’an, the Hadith is the second source of the Islamic Law of social and personal behavior, because the commandments of the Holy Prophet are as binding on the believers as the commandments of Allah. ‘Whenever Allah and the Apostle have decided a matter, it is not for a faithful man or woman to follow a course of their own choice (Q. 33:36).'”[4]

    The Hadith is to be followed exactly
    “for that which differs from the Hadith to the extent of a hair shall be given up.”[5]

    “A Muslim therefore stands in absolute need of a copy of the Qur’an and a copy of the Hadith for the guidance of his life”[6]

    References:
    1. Mishkat al-Masabih, English translation, Book 1, Introduction: Qur’an and Hadith, p.3.
    2. Itqan fi ‘Ulum al-Qur’an, Vol.II, p.182.
    3. Mishkat al-Masabih, the English translation, Book 1, the importance of the Qur’an and Hadith, p.2,3.
    4. Sahih Muslim, Introduction to English translation, P. ii.
    5. Mishkat al-Masabih, the English translation, Book 1, the importance of the Qur’an and Hadith, p.5, Quoted from Malabudda Minhu, p.8
    6. Ibid, the importance of the Qur’an and Hadith, p.2,3.

  3. Vincent, From investigating and defending all type of professionals, I can assure you all professions have people like this.

  4. WOMAN’S RIGHTS IN ISLAM

    “There is wickedness and weakness in women. Diplomacy and harshness is the remedy of wickedness, kindness and gentleness is the remedy of weakness.”
    (Ihy’a ‘Uloum ed-Din by Ghazali, Dar al-Kotob al-‘Elmeyah, Beirut, Vol II, Kitab Adab al-Nikah, p. 52.)
    Sahih Bukhari Volume 7, Book 62, Number 130:
    Narrated Um Salama:
    The Prophet took an oath that he would not enter upon some of his wives for one month. But when twenty nine days had elapsed, he went to them in the morning or evening. It was said to him, “O Allah’s Prophet! You had taken an oath that you would not enter upon them for one month.” He replied, “The month can be of twenty nine days.”
    Volume 7, Book 62, Number 131:
    Narrated Ibn ‘Abbas:
    One morning we saw the wives of the Prophet weeping, and every one of them had her family with her, I went to the mosque and found that it was crowded with people. Then ‘Umar bin Al-Khattab came and went up to the Prophet who was in his upper room. He greeted him but nobody answered. He greeted again, but nobody answered. Then the gatekeeper called him and he entered upon the Prophet, and asked, “Have you divorced your wives?” The Prophet, said, “No, but I have taken an oath not to go to them for one month.” So the Prophet stayed away (from his wives) for twenty nine days and then entered upon them.
    Woman’s rights are simple, as the following Hadith shows:
    “‘O Messenger of Allah ! What right has the wife of one among us got over him?’ He said: ‘It is that you shall give her food when you have taken your food, that you shall clothe her when you have clothed yourself, that you shall not slap her on the face, nor revile her, nor desert her except within the house.'” [1]
    MAN’S PREROGATIVES
    1. MAN MAY BEAT AND SEXUALLY DESERT HIS WIFE
    The Qur’an describes the natural relationship between the husband and the wife as one of love and mercy:
    “He has set between you love (mawaddah) and mercy.” Quran. 30:21.
    A contemporary scholar, Sayyed Qotb sees that the love and the mercy spoken of in this verse as the natural feelings the man has for the opposite sex that was planted by the creator. Earlier scholars saw that “love” between the husband and the wife in the above verse refers to the sexual act, while “mercy” refers to the offspring of the man and his wife. [2]
    The important thing to note is that this love and mercy is not found in the man apart from the woman, but it is a mutual thing found in both. And the Qur’an commands men to
    “Consort with them (women) in kindness (ma’ruf).” Quran. 4:19
    According to the Dictionary of Qur’anic terms and concepts the word “ma’ruf” means “customary law; enjoining good and forbidding evil.” [3]
    Elsewhere the word is translated many times as equitable as in Yusuf Ali’s English translation of the Qur’an.[4] In other words when women behave properly they are to be treated kindly, the treatment must be equitable according to the customary laws.
    There is also a Hadith that describes the good husband;
    “The best of you are those who are the best to their wives.” [5]
    (that Hadith is mentioned only by Tirmizi). But how far this goodness will go in difficult times, when the wife does not behave properly?
    The man according to the Qur’an has the responsibility to admonish his wife, and the right to desert her sexually, and to beat her to correct any rebelliousness in her behavior.
    REFERENCES:

    1. Sunan Ibn Magah, Kitab al-Nikah, Hadith No. 1850.
    2. See Razi and Qortobi commenting on Q. 30:21.
    3. Dictionary of Qur’anic terms and concepts, Mustansir Mir, Garland publishing inc. New York& London, 1987, p. 235.
    4. See for example Q. 2:231, 232, 233.
    5. Mishkat al-Masabih, English translation, Book 1, section ‘duties of husband and wife’, Hadith No. 68.

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