Delaware Judge Sentences DuPont Heir To Treatment Rather Than Prison In Child Rape Case Because He Would “Not Fare Well” in Prison [Updated]

1396212401000-wildc5-6ehdlb201ybix4mc8ky-original-1A Delaware Superior Court judge, Jan Jurden, is under fire after sending a wealthy heir to the DuPont fortune to treatment rather than prison because Robert H. Richards IV would “not fare well” in prison after being convicted of raping his 3-year-old daughter. [A review of the record shows the concern raised about not faring well in prison but it is not clear how stated this concern. The Judge did express concern over the lack of jail time, though it is not clear why the Judge approved the sentence]

Jurten was convicted of fourth degree rape. Under state law, fourth degree rape is defined as:

§ 770 Rape in the fourth degree; class C felony.

(a) A person is guilty of rape in the fourth degree when the person:

(1) Intentionally engages in sexual intercourse with another person, and the victim has not yet reached that victim’s sixteenth birthday; or

(2) Intentionally engages in sexual intercourse with another person, and the victim has not yet reached that victim’s eighteenth birthday, and the person is 30 years of age or older, except that such intercourse shall not be unlawful if the victim and person are married at the time of such intercourse; or

(3) Intentionally engages in sexual penetration with another person under any of the following circumstances:

a. The sexual penetration occurs without the victim’s consent; or

b. The victim has not reached that victim’s sixteenth birthday.

Richard was accused of rape after his ex-wife Tracy filed a lawsuit over the abuse of his daughter. Richards lives off a trust fund and has no job. His great-grandfather is du Pont family patriarch Irenee du Pont, and his father is Robert H. Richards III and was a named partner at the Richards Layton & Finger law firm. He lives in a mansion worth $1.8 million in Greenville. He was accused of sexually abusing his infant son between 2005 and 2007 as well as his daughter starting when she was 3. He was originally indicted on two counts of second-degree rape of a child. After the girl described sexual abuse, Tracy Richards confronted her then-husband who allegedly admitted to the abuse but said “it was an accident and he would never do it again.”

Richards took a plea to one count of rape in the fourth degree, which has no mandatory time but can result in up to 15 years in jail.

The plea bargain likely reflected the challenge of any trial based on dated accounts of a very young child. However, what Richards did plead guilty to fourth degree rape, still a very serious offense. The question is whether it is appropriate for such a felon to be spared jail due to the adjustment needed in going from a mansion to a prison cell. For some it reminds them of the recent affluenza case in Texas.

Defense lawyer Joseph A. Hurley insisted that the court got it right: “Sex offenders are the lowest of the low in prison. He’s a rich, white boy who is a wuss and a child perv. The prison can’t protect them, and Jan Jurden knows that reality. She is right on.”

What do you think?

Source: Delaware Online

102 thoughts on “Delaware Judge Sentences DuPont Heir To Treatment Rather Than Prison In Child Rape Case Because He Would “Not Fare Well” in Prison [Updated]

  1. I think that Delaware is not only corporate friendly, but ruling class friendly. Thus no surprise! We have one set of rules for the rich, and another for the rest of us. It would do him a lot of good to rub elbows with his fellow crooks and see how the rest of us live.

  2. Club Fed is only for Federal crooks who were only trying to get a better life. Thus the compassion shown.

  3. Maybe this judge should be reminded that NO child molester does well on prison. The judge needs to think of the VICTIMS before the perpetrator. This vile piece of filth has destroyed two young lives that he was supposed to protect. The judge needs to be removed from the bench aince she is so easily swayed in her decisions by the all mighty dollar. Did anyone investigate her finances?

  4. Disgusting…wonder how much was deposited in the Judge’s off-shore bank account?
    “If you can’t do the time don’t do the crime”–lock him up.

  5. Sure, the judge is right on when it is a DuPont heir. Any other person off the street would be doing serious time. Is he a registered sex offender now or was he spared that too?? Disgusting.

  6. As I had to point out to a barrister here a few days ago, there are 2 systems of justice in this country, one for the wealthy and politically connected, and one for us regular folk. This should only be disgusting, not surprising and certainly not shocking.

  7. Can the prosecutor appeal the judge’s sentence? Or did the prosecutor went along with it?

    On the other hand, if he has a diagnosed, mental illness (and clearly he does, since he committed such a horrendous crime?), then it is very common for these individuals to be placed in a treatment facility and on probation, especially if he, or any mentally ill individual, was adjudicated in a mental health court.

  8. I’ve been a victim of “Deal”aware sense of justice against Romney & RICO Gang for over a decade now; and this ruling surprises me not.

    There’s an invisible law in the State of “Deal”aware that stipulates power, money and might makes right over the Constitution(s) state or federal.

  9. Guess what? ‘Treatment’ is ineffective for offenders whose primary sexual orientation is children. This man should be castrated and the judge needs some balls.

  10. Most prison have a protective protocol for unpopular inmates , e.g. , rogue judges , rogue prosecutors , rogue LEOs , etc .

  11. A lot of people still support a church widely known to have protected priests who similarly abused children. Behavior of the church and the justice system are far worse than most of those they are supposed to be constraining.

  12. Having worked as a correctional officer in an earlier life, I can tell you the judge is right. Sentencing him to prison is the same as giving him a death sentence. Even though he would be in isolation, he would be at great risk. Prisoners have 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to think of a way to get to him. Whoever get him would have additional status inside the prison, it would be worth any additional time added to their sentence.

    I agree with whomever suggest chemical castration. That would be an additional safeguard for the public. He will be a registered sex offender. Not allowed around children. Not allowed to live near schools, etc. It is not going to be an easy life for him when he gets out.

  13. Why are we not discussing this?
    http://nypost.com/2014/03/31/68k-undocumented-immigrants-with-criminal-records-released-in-2013-report/

    The Obama administration in 2013 released nearly 68,000 undocumented immigrants who had criminal records – many of them in New York and New Jersey, according to a new review of immigration data.
    The shocking numbers came from a report released Monday by the Center for Immigration Studies, a conservative think tank that studies immigration patterns.
    Immigration and Customs Enforcement data showed that New York’s ICE office released 5,391 – about 71 percent of the 7,571 criminal undocumented immigrants it encountered, a rate second only to San Antonio, which released 79 percent.
    The Newark office came in fourth, releasing 2,149 about 60 percent of 3,581, right behind third-place Washington DC, which released 64 percent.
    Nationally, the 67,879 criminals released represented about 35 percent of all undocumented immigrants with convictions ICE encountered, according to the report, titled “Catch and Release.”
    Since June 2011, when the first of the administration’s “prosecutorial discretion” policies went into effect, ICE arrests have declined by 40 percent, the report said.
    “These figures suggest that despite claims of a focus on public safety, the administration’s prosecutorial discretion criteria are allowing factors such as family relationships, political considerations, or attention from advocacy groups to trump criminal convictions as a factor leading to deportation,” said the report, written by CIS director of policy studies Jessica Vaughan.
    An ICE spokeswoman defended the feds efforts to get undocumented criminals out of the country.
    “ICE is focused on the removal of criminal aliens. In Fiscal Year 2013 the agency removed 216,000 convicted criminals. The percentage of criminals removed continues to rise,” said ICE rep Dani Bennett.
    “Nearly 60 percent of ICE’s total removals had been previously convicted of a criminal offense, and that number rises to 82 percent for individuals removed from the interior of the US. The removal of criminal individuals is and will remain ICE’s highest priority.”

  14. Don’t worry Paul, immigration won’t matter anymore when the economy collapses because of the greedy sociopaths – who despite their billions need more and more money.

    Money in politics is going to collapse our economy because of greed and you are diverting attention from that to immigration.

    Focus. These people are getting away with rape and murder and you are concerned because some immigrants got set free.. SMH

  15. Wow, what a coincidence, Paul Schulte was a history teacher and he also worked as a correctional officer earlier in life too, just like Nick! Ol’ Nick and him should get together over a beer and discuss old times. They seem to be cut out of the same cloth and are both serene now. :D

  16. Blue Bird, The issue is not immigration, it is criminality of those here illegally. Do you believe a person here illegally, who commits a felony, should be allowed to stay? I am a strong advocate for Mexicans who work hard, do not live off the government, and obey the law. I am tough on those who don’t. This leniency for felons will create a huge backlash if it doesn’t cease.

  17. As for this disgusting human being, locking him up is the only way of protecting other children. It’s an Oligarchy judge, what else can we expect?

  18. Annie,

    The richest among us are the job creators…remember? We can’t put them in jail–just as we didn’t put the Wall Street banksters behind bars after they tanked the economy.

  19. Nick, at this point I do not care what the immigrants do.

    Americans are getting sick and tired of watching the wealthy walk for doing the same crimes that others serve life for. The backlash is coming – and people like me – we are the ones who are going to pay with our lives. You probably will too – unless you are in the 1% – then you might live a little longer than the rest of us.

    I’ve been fed a bunch of bull shit by the powers that be in this country since as far back as i can remember. I used to say the pledge of allegiance every day after the bell rang. My recent discovery that this country is the complete opposite of what it presents itself to be has been an extremely tough pill to swallow and that is saying it mildly.

    To divert attention from the real problem in this country is unfathomable. This man is raping children and you want to talk about immigrants.

    You think Mexicans live off the government? They live off of MY TAX DOLLARS and so does CONGRESS and SCOTUS. At least the Mexicans are not pissing away my tax money and denying me affordable healthcare. At least Mexicans are not taking away my rights and setting wealthy rapists and murderers free.

  20. Blue Bird – Mexican groups like La Raza are helping less wealthy rapists and murderers get free. La Raza and its supporting groups are allowing tons of illegal drugs into the country. And when you support them you are supporting the drug violence in Mexico. You are complicit in the murder of thousands, both innocent and guilty.

    One man raped one child and is getting treatment. 68000 committed crimes and are going free. That would be 1%ER Barack Obama and his minions who are responsible for their freedom.

  21. How strange to fixate on immigration when the subject of this blogpost is that this dispicable person is getting preferential treatment because of his wealth.

  22. You close this report with a characteristic “What do you think?”. It is fairly obvious what most more or less healthy people would think. And it should be obvious the outrage that should be and is unleashed by this sort of event.
    It is a banal and impotent outrage.

    Has now the standard of justice been so perverted that it hinges upon what someone can bear…in prison? By such a measure , or principle (if the word is not to much abused in this context) the “justice” system would be a different system.

    But I toss it back to you Mr. Turley… What do you think?
    What do you think about a system that you teach, that is presumably founded on principles that would exclude this sort of outcome, and then consider other perversions of justice that you so often and so well document in these pages/posts… and then consider the principles that you teach that presumably also underlie our justice system …. Where is the disconnect? What is wrong? Something more profound than the usual wailing about how “its all corrupt” or some such thing… Is it? actually completely corrupted? Our system of justice?
    If it is , what is the functional dynamics/principles of the corruption? Money? Power? of course… but how, and why, and when?

    Or… what is the right question to be asked in light of this and other cases?

    Then please tell us what you think.

    We can be outraged… maybe you and your peers need to be more courageous in moments like this and tell us something more than a blog version of a “Cops” Show, where we can ‘tut tut’ and feel upset and angry about “those people”… and never get any deeper than our unfocused feelings….
    And feelings mostly uninformed by either facts or principle.

    It is apparent that something is fundamentally and structurally wrong with our system of Justice… What is it? Beyond anecdotal stories and cases like this… What is it ,Mr Turly ,that is wrong?
    I wish you or someone who has understanding at the structural level of our justice system would respond.

    We need something more than just daily outrages and violations of some commonly felt sense of justice – a feeling that something is wrong though essentially not understood.

    This report could be a starting point, : how is it that this decision even makes any sense at all?
    But this case is too small to bear the larger point more than an introduction to my hard and heavy question and request…

    So… again… What do you think? And be deep and detailed, not simply anecdotal… please.

    ~michael

  23. ….and to the Oligarchy for which it stands, many nations, under oppression, with liberty and justice for the wealthy.

  24. Paul Schulte

    “How strange to fixate on one case when there are 68000 released felons to deal with?”

    *****

    File a complaint with the author of this blog post about his “fixating” on this one case.

  25. “How strange to fixate on immigration when the subject of this blogpost is that this dispicable person is getting preferential treatment because of his wealth.” Right. Like when you hijack a thread about Muslim extremists by pointing out stupid things like Christians do?

  26. This may or may not be the result of his wealth. I’ve had public defender clients spared jail because they would not fare well. Two that stand out are a cute, slightly built white kid (barely adult) and a trans (or at least cross dressing) black male. The judges in those cases explicitly spared them jail because of what might happen to them. And they were poor.

  27. As the leader of the Occupy jonathanturley.org movement, I criticized your sources because they were ALL left-wing. I told you that then.

  28. Blue Bird, Thanks for your honest reply. When you said “At this point I don’t care what immigrants[illegal] do,” you showed the intellectual honesty no one else here has. Indeed, some of the people taking personal swipes @ myself and others having the temerity to want a nation of laws think the same as you. However, instead of having the honesty to say so, they take personal sniping positions. I’m not being one bit sarcastic when I give you kudos for your honesty. I truly appreciate honesty.

    I care WHAT ALL PEOPLE in this country do vis a vis the law. If you read my first comment on this thread you will see we are sympatico about there being 2 systems of justice in this country, one for the wealthy and connected, and one for regular folk. The big difference is I don’t see the solution being giving lawbreakers who aren’t wealthy or connected a free pass. That is anarchy. The solution is to bring the “lofty” back to where they belong, w/ EVERY other person. Your comments are substantive, there has been a paucity of that lately.

  29. Paul,

    You failed to due a thorough investigation. You made that claim after reading one of my posts. I’ve been writing posts for RIL since 2010. I guess it might be too much work for you to actually check out my posts before making such a claim.

    BTW, I didn’t post my birth certificate on the blog. Maybe I’m not really a citizen of this country. Maybe I’m one of those criminal illegal aliens you’ve been focusing on today.

  30. Blue Bird, I forgot to reply about Mexicans living off the government. They are people w/ a great work ethic. The sin is the government spent millions of our dollars doing advertisements in Spanish telling them they were chumps if they didn’t take assistance. They guilt tripped them saying “what about the kids.” In my mind this is unconscionable. When media brought attention to these shameful radio ads they ceased abruptly. Get people dependent on the govt. and you got a lifelong Dem voter. Thankfully, these stupid ads didn’t fool savvy, hard working, entrepreneurial, Mexicans. They will not allow the Dems to enslave them.

  31. The injustice does not stop with Robert H. Richards IV. Have we forgotten about Bubba in the state prison either?

    It seems now Bubba cannot have cellmates representing the full spectrum of society. He should have a right to “marry” whomever he chooses.

  32. Elaine – along with others you have a habit of not reading what I wrote. I originally wrote that it was your use of left-wing sources for that particular blog/subject. You then listed a bunch of other sources, none of which you used for that blog and which did not list any of the blogs you were using that day. In the short time I have been following jonathanturley.org you have used far left wing sources in all but one case.

    Thank you for recognizing the continuing efforts of Occupy jonathanturley.org. :) Donations are accepted.

  33. Paul,

    It appears you don’t always read what you write.
    ;)

    BTW, I don’t really care whether or not you approve of the sources that I use for my blog posts.

  34. nick spinelli

    As I had to point out to a barrister here a few days ago, there are 2 systems of justice in this country, one for the wealthy and politically connected, and one for us regular folk. This should only be disgusting, not surprising and certainly not shocking.
    =============
    The “its ok if we do it” mantra of exceptionalism comes to mind.

    Didn’t you recentl post a negative reply to “we are just as bad” as other nations when we do this, arguing that it is not bad when we do it?

  35. Paul Schulte

    As the leader of the Occupy jonathanturley.org movement, I criticized your sources because they were ALL left-wing. I told you that then.
    =================
    A juggler of wings is not equivalent to one who finds an actual source.

    Source means an origin to a competent journalist, whether professional journalist or honest citizen journalist.

    The trouble is that water muddiers think “origin” or “source” means “anywhere I find it.”

    Origin is the only place for the real source.

    Like the source of the Mississippi or Nile River.

    It isn’t everywhere, or even two places if it is the origin and the source.

  36. Dredd, I don’t understand your question. But, when one speaks of Saudi Arabia, we simply are not as bad. It’s apples and cantaloupe. Dredd, I speak often about how unfair our system of justice can be. I worked in it for decades. However, I do not know of any better. I will blast our system w/o hesitation but I will defend it as flawed, but still worthy.

  37. Elaine – if you are complaining about me criticizing your use of sources and you are defending yourself, then you do care.

    Thank you for recognizing the continuing efforts of Occupy jonathanturley.org. :) Donations are accepted.

  38. Defense lawyer Joseph A. Hurley insisted that the court got it right: “Sex offenders are the lowest of the low in prison. He’s a rich, white boy who is a wuss and a child perv. The prison can’t protect them, and Jan Jurden knows that reality. She is right on.”

    What do you think?
    ===============
    That is what mental hospitals are for.

  39. Nick Spinelli

    Dredd, I don’t understand your question. But, when one speaks of Saudi Arabia, we simply are not as bad. It’s apples and cantaloupe. Dredd, I speak often about how unfair our system of justice can be. I worked in it for decades. However, I do not know of any better. I will blast our system w/o hesitation but I will defend it as flawed, but still worthy.
    ============
    American mass-murderers, plunderers, and other psychopaths are not as bad as Saudi Arabian mass-murderers, plunderers, and other psychopaths?

    Not really, jingoism and exceptionalist notions are lethal mutations that distort cognition.

    Equal justice under international law is fundamental, not “sophisticated.”

  40. Dredd – “A juggler of wings is not equivalent to one who finds an actual source.”

    =============

    I have no idea what this means. Is this some kind of legalese?

  41. Nick Spinelli

    Laser, I have not had a comment retrieved in months! Speaking of 2 systems of justice.
    ====================
    Exactly.

  42. Paul Schulte

    Dredd – “A juggler of wings is not equivalent to one who finds an actual source.”

    =============

    I have no idea what this means. Is this some kind of legalese?
    ================
    It means that left wing and right wing propaganda can not be neutralized by citing both as origin or source.

    Two Wongs don’t make a Wight.

  43. Paul,

    I was just proving that some people make claims when they don’t have sufficient evidence to back them up.

    That’s the last I’ll say on the subject.

  44. Dredd, We’ll simply have to disagree on your comparison of the Kingdom v US system of justice. You know they lock you up in the Kingdom simply for an auto accident, don’t you. My daughter would be doing life!

  45. I think the modern Statue of Justice is a tired old lady whose blindfold has slipped down allowing her to see the defendants. He scales are labeled ” rich and powerful” on one side and weighted down in that direction. Her sword is double edged with the side labeled, ” common and poor” being bright and sharp and the side labeled the rich and famous being dull and nicked.

    One wonders how the legal education system allowed such a person to slip through without giving them the value of objective justice.

  46. Unbelievable! I agree with Paul–money buys justice. Are there any honest judges left in this country??

  47. Another case of Affluenza? To put an immigration spin on this child rape case, why not deport Richards to Mexico and let some undocumented Mexican family in Delaware have his house if they adopt his daughter?

  48. So then, if his traumatized victims grow up to be maladjusted adults and act out or self medicate and commit an offense….will they be afforded the same leniency when they are sentenced? Doubtful.

  49. Here is what I have to say to both the judge and the defense lawyer: “Got any young girls in your house? Yes. So you’re willing to have him do his probation with you then?”

  50. Paul Schulte@12:04pm
    Having worked as a correctional officer in an earlier life, I can tell you the judge is right. Sentencing him to prison is the same as giving him a death sentence. Even though he would be in isolation, he would be at great risk.

    ==================
    Mahogany@2:46
    This may or may not be the result of his wealth. I’ve had public defender clients spared jail because they would not fare well. Two that stand out are a cute, slightly built white kid (barely adult) and a trans (or at least cross dressing) black male. The judges in those cases explicitly spared them jail because of what might happen to them. And they were poor.
    ================================

    Court records show Richards as 6-foot-4, between 250 and 276 pounds.

    you’d know that if you click “source”

  51. The duty of the defense lawyer is to represent the rights of the defendant as guaranteed by the Constitution , statutes and case law .
    The duty of the judge is to follow the rule of law ; I believe her sentence was inappropriate .

  52. He’s a waste of human breath.He was convicted. Lock him up, and let the chips fall where they may. If it was some poor person, they’d have been taken away immediately. Also, confiscate that trust fund and put it towards the healing of children who’ve been sexually abused. Let that cash do some good, instead of the evil this man has perpetrated.

  53. My guess is that he is going to lose the house and much of the trust fund in the coming divorce.

  54. Maybe Bob Richards and Anthony Weiner could get their own reality show on MTV. They could have a contest on what to call the show.

  55. Nick & Dredd;

    Our system of laws, with the intent thereof to garner civility – is awesome.

    That being said, there are those wicked ones who draft and certify a less than good faith intent (such as the recent decision’s of courts to permit many charges to beat a party into submission and/or the Sup Ct. recent decision to up the limits on contributions).

    Justice Thomas says it all (in his Monsanto way) – that there should be NONE!

    Be that as it may, our problems in our legal system is the diametric good faith intent of Code & Rules drafters and the autocratic system of nominating, confirming and entrenching justice system administrators and warriors/watchdogs.

    As I attempted to say (in a censored comment) – WE (you and I) are the ones who are at fault for our systems of justice being disenfranchising.

    If society doesn’t care enough to STAY involved (due diligently) – the weeds will grow, expand and choke the harvesting of the integrity of justice.

    United we stand;
    divided by apathy/laxity
    we are already conquered!

  56. I think they should send him to Texas where “gun control” means holding it with two hands and the phrase “he needed killing” is an affirmative defense.

  57. … Texas where “gun control” means holding it with two hands and the phrase “he needed killing” is an affirmative defense.

    I knew a rogue trial judge who deserved to die on the spot , on the square , from immediate physical trauma .

    A true jury of peers would never leave the jury box , to announce to the court , “ What took so long ? ”

  58. What kind of justice is this? Thinking throwing him in prison is a “death” sentence is probably correct. Though Think about what he did to these poor innocent children. He is a big guy and by body mass alone is just as able to handle himself should he need to. No this was a case of abuse of wealth and power and it sickens me. It sickens me to think that those poor babies were scarred for life because of what he did and he isn’t being punished. He is just out there free do hurt someone elses child. The judge is just as bad if not worse. She willing let a man who confessed to such an unbelievable and disturbing crime off with a slap on the hand and a kiss on his ass. I am happy that the mother had the courage to go through with the lawsuit though I am sure it was difficult. She is a brave and honorable woman for doing the right thing where as there are several mothers out there that wouldn’t dare going through with it. I just wonder where the rest of the family is. This man may be the heir to the family fortune but those kids are the ones next in line for it, take it from him and give it to them. Then throw him in prison and let his sorry butt fend for himself.

  59. I live in Delaware, and I truly despise this state. The system is here is totally unjust and extremely unfair, for lack of a better word. Years ago when I was a child, I often used to hear stories/myths of the DuPont family mating with their own bloodline, to keep their riches in the family line. And that there’s a special wing in the DuPont Children’s Hospital where there are offspring who are deformed and mentally retarded, and how they make these strange noises. After reading about this sick and twisted DuPont freak, I believe it now!

  60. I live in Delaware too and I don’t think we have heard the end of this story. The prosecutor only asked for probation and a representative for the Attorney General says he was never informed about the case. It happened in 2009 and got no media coverage then. We are only hearing about now because of the civil suit.

    Our prisons aren’t that violent. Nobody would have killed him.

  61. Punishing people using adverse stimuli as a social control mechanism seems invariably to drive society, and the people who comprise society, toward an ever escalating form of learned helplessness.

    It is one thing to punish, using adverse stimuli, a person for acting in undesired ways, and quite another thing to punish particular behaviors for unwanted consequences of the behavior being punished.

    Is punishment hurting a person who was hurt so badly that the person has become incapable of using words to describe the hurt and acting out the hurt non-verbally is the person’s last resort prior to self-destruction?

    Is punishment doing what actually makes less likely in the future some behavior that someone has recognized as undesirable because of the consequences the undesirable behavior generates?

    Is it better to punish the offender or better to punish the offense?

    How can the offense be punished without punishing the offender?

    For myself, that is a trivial issue at the cutting edge of the social evolution of social psychology when honestly applied to criminology; hurting people for having been hurt against their informed consent only compounds human hurtfulness.

    Is there an practical and practicable alternative to human society based structurally on conflict or based structurally on consensus?

    In my view, definitely. That structure is based on avoiding the depersonalization and deindividuation that both conflict-based and consensus-based societies relentlessly demand in order to sustain conflict or to sustain consensus. Societies based on conflict and/or consensus require some form of groupthink mechanism to enforce social norms that are internally self-contradicting. The alternative to groupthink-based societies is social structues based on collaboration of individual persons who communicate using dialogue as in, for example, Martin Buber’s I and Thou.

    In my view, the rule of law has five basic questions: Who? What? When? Where? How?

    In my view, journalism has six questions: Who? What? When? Where? How? and Why?

    In my view, scientists have seven questions: Who? What? When? Where? How? Why? and Whenceforth?

    If it is wrong to hurt people, then it is no less wrong to hurt people who have been so badly hurt that they can only share their agony with others through hurting others?

    What actually distinguishes punishing offenders for having been punished by offenders for having been punished by offenders, this having been a social pattern that has persisted throughout human written history?

    What is a useful name for doing that which is objectionable in order to reduce doing that which is objectionable? How about, “insane psychosis,” if insanity is a legal construct and psychosis is a neurological construct, and doing that which is objectionable to reduce what is objectionable is a contradiction in process?

  62. What to do? Lynch the judge as an example to others. The only thing worse than a father who would rape his own child, is a judge that would protect him.

  63. Dr. Harris;

    You can babble psychological banter obfuscating as much as you wish; but your logic is ill-fated and works contrary to simple common sense.

    If you don’t arrest persons (who are ignoring their fear of punishment) from their bad faith behavior, it is likely to continue.

    Even with POTUS wannabe’s and DuPont heirs.

  64. Can the victim and prosecutor appeal this sentencing to a higher court? Does the Du Pont family have ties with this judge?????

  65. Beau Biden released a statement today defending the decision. And of course, everything he says is true. But none of it explains why the judge’s stated rationale was that he would not fare well in prison.

  66. The judge should be removed period. Since when do we make it easy for child rapists. Did he think of his daughter as he defiled and ripped her up. He should be raped and see what it feels like.

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