Minnesota Law Professor Charged With Massive Criminal Fraud

adams006+(1)University of Minnesota law professor Edward S. Adams is facing an astonishing criminal indictment over millions of missing funds from investors in his companies.  The indictment says that Adams perpetrated an elaborate fraud on investors and fellow partners.  According to the indictment, from 2006 to 2013, Edward S. Adams stole more than $4.38 million from investors and paid more than $2.54 million to his own law firm.

What is astonishing is that Adams is the second faculty member to face criminal charges on the Minnesota law faculty. Continue reading

RES IPSA REACHES 31,000,000

This morning, our blog hit 31,000,000 views. We have had an increase in visitors and our new voices are heartily welcomed to our little band of commentators.  We try to offer a place for civil but passionate discourse on legal and policy issues  of our time (and perhaps a few wacky stories).  We continue to rank in the top legal blogs in the world and we are continuing to see a growing international readership. We often use these milestones to look at the current profile of the blog and its supporters around the world.

As always, I want to offer special thanks for our weekend contributors: Mike Appleton, Larry Rafferty, Darren Smith, Kimberly Dienes, and Cara Gallagher. I particularly want to thank Darren who has continued to help manage the blog and help out folks who encounter posting problems.

I also want to thank our regular commentators and readers.  We try to keep this blog as an open forum with as little interference or monitoring of the comments as possible.  Given our free speech orientation, we try not to delete comments and, for that reason, we are deeply appreciative of how most people avoid personal or offensive comments in debating these issues.  The success of this blog is due to the fact that we offer something more than the all-too-common troll-driven, angry, and insulting commentary of the Internet.  Thank you for voluntarily assuming restraint over the tenor and content of your comments. Continue reading

Hampshire College Student Allegedly Assaults Basketball Players For Wearing Braids As A Form Of Cultural Appropriation

Hampshire-college-logoWe have seen rising violence and intolerance on our colleges and universities as some students seek to prevent speakers and claim an ever-widening array of “microaggressions”  and cultural appropriations.  The latest occurred during a basketball game where a player was attacked due to wearing braids that 20-year-old Hispanic student, Carmen Figueroa, claimed to be cultural misappropriation.

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2017 Law School Rankings: Winners and Losers

The new law school ranking are out by U.S. News & World Report and there are the usual winners and losers. Indeed, I have connected to both.  George Washington University, where I teach, is down 6 slots to 30 (the continuation of a trend where GW dropped 3 spots the year before and 2.5 slots that year before that).  Northwestern, my alma mater, was one of the big winners in breaking into the top ten law schools.  While professors overwhelmingly express contempt over the ranking, I have long been in the minority. I view the rankings as very helpful for students. (There was no such resource when I applied to law school).  Moreover, they are generally reliable in my view, though I would disagree with some specific rankings.

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Carleton University Ban Scales At School Gym Due To “Triggering” Some Students

Carleton University has students and some faculty upset over a decision to remove scales for its gym because, according to one students, “scales are very triggering” for people with eating disorders.  Some asked if mirrors would be next.  However, that decision was already made in one dorm in  Bucknell University where mirrors were covered  in an effort to promote “body positivity” and “self-love.”  Various schools have similarly adopted “mirrorless Mondays” to combat eating disorders and triggering episodes.

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Impeachable Tweets: A Response To Professor Tribe