Swipe Left: Arizona Man Arrested After Allegedly Stealing Women’s Purse on First Date

David Harlow, 38, may not be a good option for a second date for a woman who met him through Tinder. After she went to the bathroom at their first face-to-face meeting, Harlow allegedly ran off with her purse.

 

Harlow allegedly took her credit card to a casino and tried to withdraw money from several banks.  With the addition of Tinder, withdrawing money from areas clearly under surveillance shows that Harlow may be as bad a crook as he is a date.  It is always astonishing to me that people do not see the exceptionally low likelihood of getting away with such crimes . . .  or even having time to spend the ill-gotten gains.

Harlow reportedly has a record and he now faces charges of felony theft, theft of a credit card, and taking the identity of another.

He has however been released pending trial so women might want to swipe left if they encounter him on Tinder.

18 thoughts on “Swipe Left: Arizona Man Arrested After Allegedly Stealing Women’s Purse on First Date

  1. Would this woman leave her purse with a stranger she just randomly met in a bar? Just because a dating/hookup website makes it easier to find someone doesn’t mean the people you find are any better or worse than those you’d find in person. The responsibility is still with the individual and not the website. Regulations can only go so far to protect against the predators and the prey (idiots) that think human nature has evolved.

  2. First of all, Tinder is not a dating site, but a casual hook up site. It boggles my mind how people would be alone with complete strangers they met on a meat market (or STD distribution site). Why would you leave your purse with a total stranger anyway? There are so many tales of people getting swindled, or worse, from people they meet online. It’s a cautionary tale.

    People should be more careful and, if they want to actually date someone they meet online, use a site that does a background check and ID check. And then still take your purse with you to the lady’s room until you know the person better.

  3. Harlow allegedly took her credit card to a casino and tried to withdraw money from several banks. With the addition of Tinder, withdrawing money from areas clearly under surveillance shows that Harlow may be as bad a crook as he is a date. It is always astonishing to me that people do not see the exceptionally low likelihood of getting away with such crimes . . . or even having time to spend the ill-gotten gains.

    It’s astonishing to you because the cognitive process of someone impetuous, dopey, and unscrupulous is not yours.

  4. I have never been on a date where my date left her purse on the table. Now, as a married man, I am in charge of the purse when she goes to the powder room.

  5. Does this show that we need the Federal government to regulate dating sites, and make all participants go through extreme vetting?

      • I know that you made the comment about the vetting of individuals on these dating sites in jest; however, all sorts of dangerous predators lurk on these seemingly innocuous sites. Yes, it’s true, and this woman could have easily have had much worse occur than the loss of her purse. Having these sites be required–through mandatory regulations, which they are unable to skirt–to run the most rudimentary of background checks on these participants is actually an excellent idea. It is, quite frankly, a public safety issue, and it is evident that these sites will refuse to take the necessary precautions unless forced, by those dreaded regulations that you abhor, to do so. Let’s face it–most people are quite trusting and incredibly naive when meeting up with strangers who post profiles in these venues. They never really know with whom they will be meeting, so, putting the onus on them, as opposed to run these sites, to independently run any sort of a full background check on the stranger sitting on the other side of that computer, prior to the first encounter, may prove to be useless. There was a famous case, several years back, of a woman who, I believe, sued match.com for millions due to the fact that she met an individual, through that particular site, who stalked her and beat her to within inches of her life. She claimed that the purpose of her lawsuit was to force some sort of regulation within this industry–and, yes, it is an industry–requiring these companies to perform some sort of vetting or background check on those utilizing their services. I don’t know what happened with the lawsuit; however, I do firmly believe that, at the very least, criminal record checks should be a requirement before anyone is permitted to post on these sites. Anyone spooked by the thought of having to pass a criminal background check will, I assume, look elsewhere for victims.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s