Meet Michale Neu: Nigerian Prince

michael-neujpg-bdaf90b24c8ac6cfEver wonder who is behind those email messages from Nigerian princes promising millions if you could just send some money to help him release his fortune?  Well, meet Michale Neu, allegedly a 67-year-old “Nigerian Prince” from Slidell, Louisiana.  Neu was arrested and charged with 269 counts of wire fraud and money laundering by the Slidell Police Department’s Financial Crimes Division after a long investigation into an Internet scam.

 

Neu is accused of being the “middle man” in this scam to bilk people out of thousands of dollars.  He was allegedly working with people in Nigeria.  It was a stereotypical pitch where he (and his cohorts) would claim to be a Nigerian prince who need to send financial information to release millions in inheritance.

It is always astonishing to find that people fall for the scam, but many of us have long wondered what type of lowlife would make a living with such scams.  According to police, Neu is one of those people.

Neu previously worked for a religious organization called the Blessings of the Spirit Ministries, where he was vice president and treasurer. The organization is based in Grand Prairie, Tex., near Dallas, and he says that he had not been associated with them for ten years since moving to Louisiana.  That was well before he emerged as a Nigerian prince.

24 thoughts on “Meet Michale Neu: Nigerian Prince”

  1. Ever wonder who is behind the scam of “Affirmative Action Privilege?”

    What mug shots those would be.

    They surreptitiously abide amongst us.

    1. Trading Places and Coming to America were some of my favorite comedies from the 80s. They could never be made today under the watchful eye of the PC police, nor would any of Mel Brooks movies.

      But…you’re wearing lederhosen.

  2. The bigger injustice here is why it took so long to find this potatoe face, amd why investigators are always dumber than perps. This criminal should be hired by law enforcement, obviously someone who is more capable than a thousand investigators who should be fired, but won’t be because public jobs are more sacred than cleaning up crime and incompetence in government. Seriously, a fifth-grade hacker would have fingered this perp 10 years ago. Internet crime today would be all but non-existent if only lazy deadwood in law enforcement would be replaced by fifth-grade hackers.

  3. Many years ago our President to be said he would send all the slaves back to Nigeria. But after the Civil War he did not do so. Now we have more Nigerians coming over by internet.

    1. How do we build a Wall to stop this apCray? We need to educate people who have computers to avoid any emails from non family members.

    2. Not to be too picky but, the United States did establish Liberia as a nation in Africa where former slaves could move to. The capitol, Monrovia, is named for US President James Monroe.

  4. According to the left, if he self-identifies as a Nigerian Prince then we are not allowed to question his delusion or motives. Indeed, we should probabl establish a hashtag to support him and a well-funded social justice movement to free him from prison.

  5. Lots of really stupid people who never heard the old adage “if it’s too good to be true it probably is false.’ ACA a fine example along with the ethanol scam and the everyone gets a house bubble bursting scam.

    Let’s see and the no more draft scam.

    and the Tariff scam

    Funny how most of these are government oriented.

    Did I mention the inflation, devaluation, debt repudiation scam?

    That one cost the consumer 30% loss in buying power even if they didn’t answer. But hit the elderly and the retirees the hardest. One of the Obamanomic legacies. But …. the others were spread over a ‘collusion’ of RINOs and DINOs

  6. He doesn’t look like a Nigerian Prince, or am I just being racist. 😉 Although they never seem to send a picture.

    1. 419eater, a site dedicated to annoying and hassling Nigerian email scammers, has some wonderful pics. They have a knack for convincing scammers to pose wearing fish in their heads, holding insulting signs, or re-enacting old Monty Python routines.

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