New Jersey Man Caught On Video Faking Slip and Fall

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In Torts, we discussed slip-and-falls and the problem of fraudulent claims against businesses. The upgrading and expansion of surveillance cameras help protect against such liability (more than catching shoplifters). It is rare however to see a fraudulent slip and fall in realtime.

In Woodbridge, New Jersey, a 57-year-old man was under a subcontract to work at a company when he decided to fake a fall. As the surveillance below shows he threw ice on the ground and then laid down and waited to be discovered.

Prosecutors maintain that the videotape conclusively shows insurance fraud and theft by deception.

 It would certainly seem a case begging for a plea bargain.

9 thoughts on “New Jersey Man Caught On Video Faking Slip and Fall”

  1. Over forty ago, I worked in claims for a big East Coast insurance company. Many insurers subscribed to the Central Index Bureau (CIB), to which insurers submitted information about claimants who made claims against their insureds. A CIB check revealed a woman claimant who had made 6 claims against various hotels and restaurants, including Howard Johnson’s, for the exact same injury. She had one injury to her ankle which showed up on an X-ray, but she made multiple claims falsely asserting to 6 various businesses that the injury occurred in their business as a result of their negligence. I sat down with her to take her statement knowing she was a fraud, but was amazed at how convincing her story was. She was good at her chosen occupation and I suspect I would have believed her if not for the information I already had in my possession. Security cameras take the CIB system to a higher level.

  2. New Jersey Man Caught On Video Faking Slip and Fall

    The New Jersey Man Caught On Video Faking Slip and Fall is a loser.

    Three hots and a cot would be way too light a punishment for this loser from NJ.

    Although, however, a week in the public square manacled to a stockade would be a proper deterrent in keeping like minded losers from acting upon their insurance scamming urges.

  3. I suspect not his first fraud. Forget a plea bargain. Jail time is warranted and restitution to the business for any any costs they incurred. Then a good ass whipping behind the shed.

    1. Punishment should fit the crime. Convict him and assess punishment consiting of throwing him off a boat in the arctic onto a floating ice pad miles from no where. Take a video and send it to his family.

      1. “Punishment should fit the crime . . . assess punishment consiting of throwing him off a boat in the arctic onto a floating ice pad miles from no where.”

        I think some explanation would help to show exactly how this sort of punishment would fit the crime. I mean, it’s not exactly evident on its face.

    2. Jail time is warranted because you “suspect” this is not his first fraud. That kind of enthusiasm for due process could win you a spot on the Senate Judiciary Committee.

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