Police Arrest Oklahoma Man With Radioactive Material, Rattlesnake, and A Bottle of Kentucky Whiskey In Stolen Car

Stephen Jennings mug shot

Stephen Jennings, 41, is certainly a memorable pullover for the Guthrie, Oklahoma police. The officer spotted an expired tag and what he found was . . . well . . . unique.

The expired plate and even the suspended driver’s license are hardly out of the ordinary. However, the search of the car soon revealed a canister of uranium, a timber rattlesnake, and an open bottle of Kentucky Deluxe whiskey.

Also arrested at the time was Racheal Rivera who was charged with possession of firearm after a former felony conviction.

Crews with the Emergency Management Institute later confirmed that the yellow substance in the canister was radioactive. Oh, and the car was stolen.

Jennings is now charged with a felony count of possession of a stolen vehicle, and misdemeanor counts of transporting an open container of liquor, operating a motor vehicle with a suspended driver’s license and failure to carry security verification form. Strangely there was no report of a charge for driving around with radioactive material.

14 thoughts on “Police Arrest Oklahoma Man With Radioactive Material, Rattlesnake, and A Bottle of Kentucky Whiskey In Stolen Car”

  1. This was really stupid on the part of the perps. If he had unshielded uranium, they have to get their thyroid tested, and maybe go on a course of iodine. If he had unshielded uranium on the seat next to him, then he’s been blasting his gonads with mutagenic radioactivity for a while. Since the cops know what color uranium cake is now, they have to get their thyroid checked, too. If they require treatment, then additional charges may be added to the driver for exposing them.

    I wonder if this is one of those antique samples still rattling around out there from the era when scientists believed radioactivity was healthy. They even used to add it to cosmetics, like lipsticks.

    1. As for the uranium itself, the article doesn’t say what grade it was. It could be anywhere from a barely registering blip to a significant dose. Its decay products are also an issue, as well. Plus, the dust can be inhaled.

    2. ” If he had unshielded uranium on the seat next to him, then he’s been blasting his gonads with mutagenic radioactivity for a while. Since the cops know what color uranium cake is now, they have to get their thyroid checked, too. If they require treatment, then additional charges may be added to the driver for exposing them”

      “Yellowcake” Uranium is raw ore, and only slightly radioactive. It doesn’t pose a thyroid risk – moslty that is caused by radioactive isotopes of iodine which are made when uranium is burned in a nuclear reactor.

      “I wonder if this is one of those antique samples still rattling around out there from the era when scientists believed radioactivity was healthy. They even used to add it to cosmetics, like lipsticks.”

      That was radium you’re thinking of. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=whJDVnyuW44

  2. Charge them for contributing to the delinquency of a snake for letting it drink whiskey.

    They were probably transporting the uranium to some movie director who wanted a glowing review of their movie.

  3. That was really stupid on the part of the perps. If the canister wasn’t lead shielded, they are going to have to go get their thyroid tested. The cops who know what color uranium cake is now have to do the same. If he had it on the seat next to him, improperly shielded, then he was blasting his gonads the whole time with mutagenic radioactivity.

    Maybe this was an antique sample still out there from the era when radioactive substances were considered a health additive. They used to add it to lipstick to create a glow in the dark effect.

    1. about uranium. it’s very abundant and often lying around embedded in other rocks, apparently., wiki:

      .Surficial deposits are broadly defined as Tertiary to Recent near-surface uranium concentrations in sediments or soils.[11] Mineralization in calcrete (calcium and magnesium carbonates) are the largest of the surficial deposits. They are interbedded with Tertiary sand and clay, which are usually cemented by calcium and magnesium carbonates.[10] Surficial deposits also occur in peat bogs, karst caverns and soils.

      Surficial deposits account for approximately 4% of world uranium resources.

  4. Dave, you wouldn’t happen to be 5’ tall, living in a van and unpopular with the ladies, eh? Just saying

    1. dating sites, lol. sorry guys but if you have to use dating sites you are second stringers at best, no matter what your height.

      little guys gotta be tough minded but sometimes their mouths get them in trouble

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