Have You Seen This Man?

Yes, that is the question that the Riverside police are asking after circulating a caricature picture of a man who stole an artist’s money but left behind his picture.

In a Facebook posting, the police state the following:

DO YOU RECOGNIZE THIS CARICATURE? And no, we are not kidding…

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, the victim was working as a caricature artist at the Festival of Lights event in downtown Riverside. Around 11:50 p.m., the suspect approached the victim and asked for a portrait of himself. The victim agreed and created the attached caricature of the suspect. Once the victim was finished, the suspect grabbed a money bag that belonged to the victim, which contained about $500 in cash. The suspect fled on foot leaving his portrait behind.

This caricature is of the suspect, but of course, has exaggerated characteristics and features. The suspect was described as a Black make adult in his early 20’s, about 5’1” tall with an average build, black hair and mustache, and last seen wearing a blue and red jacket, white undershirt, black pants, and red hat.

Anyone with information regarding the suspect’s identity or of this investigation is urged to contact Detective Jeff Putnam at (951) 826-2054 or jputnam@riversideca.gov.

The trial could prove quite interesting . . . following a line up of caricatured suspects.

Of course, it could be worse. This was Alice Bailly’s self-portrait and explains why abstract artists make for the worst eye-witnesses and sketch artists.

11 thoughts on “Have You Seen This Man?”

  1. Al Hirschfeld was the exception to that rule. However, I’ve had caricatures made of my wife and me by local artists which were recognizable drawings of us. Not admissible in a line-up, but robbery wasn’t my trade, then or now.

  2. Well, the police will at least have an exact description of what the artist was wearing.

    Stealing the day’s wages of a caricature artist is pretty low. These may be art students, or people working an extra job to make ends meet. Or they could go on to become political satire cartoonists. The best ones emphasize personality in a way the subject will enjoy, rather than cruel mockery.

    In any case, caricature is on the low end of the sketching side of art. It can be nuanced or clumsy. Sealing from one of these artists is like kicking someone when they are just starting out.

  3. I don’t think her self-portrait counts as ‘abstract art’, as it is a distorted representation, not an abstraction. Art history is not my book, to be sure.

      1. Al Hirschfeld was able to both evoke essential facets of his caricature subjects while also depicting them recognizably – mostly. It’s a rare Hirschfeld caricature which the average moviegoer cannot identify as being the artist he portrayed.

Leave a Reply