“Either You Are Anti-Racist or Racist”: California Professor Put On Administrative Leave After Commenting On The Japanese Internment Camps

Last November, the Santa Barbara City College announced the selection of Joyce Coleman as the new vice president of the School of Extended Learning.  Now Coleman has been put on administrative leave due to a comment made about Japanese internment camps that was denounced as causing “great harm” to the Asian community. The action is particularly notable given Coleman’s own campaign against racism in education.  Coleman, who is African American, has been a prominent voice against racism in society and particularly in education.  She reportedly observed in March in a Zoom event that “There is no such thing as not being racist. Either you are anti-racist or racist.” As will come as no surprise to many on this blog, I believe that Coleman’s statement should be considered protected by free speech and academic freedom principles. 

Coleman also has been quoted as explaining that “white folks are all on a journey to realize their own guilt.” She is now on a journey of her own after being the subject of a formal investigation after a comment that she made at the SBCC’s Equal Opportunity Advisory Committee on March 23, according to Santa Barbara Independent. The Committee had formed a new “affinity group” on behalf of the Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) community after the March shooting in Atlanta that killed eight people, including six Asian women.

Coleman reportedly said “about time,” and then noted that she has always been perplexed by the response of the Japanese to their internment. The Independent reported:

“The complaint alleges Coleman, who is Black, reportedly greeted news of [a new campus affinity group on behalf of Asian-American Pacific Islanders] formation with the words, “About time,” and then described having visited an internment camp for Japanese and Japanese American people during World War II and wondering why the prisoners there “did not just leave,” given how small the fence was. By contrast, Coleman allegedly noted, Black American slaves formed the Underground Railroad and actively resisted.

Some campus faculty and staff took offense to what they described as “victim blaming,” charging that she inflicted “great harm” by her words and actions.

I can certainly understand why members of the AAPI community would be offended. However, the response should be to challenge Coleman’s assumptions and knowledge. Instead, some members of the community brought a formal complaint.  I agree with the AAPI community that the comments were ill-informed and insulting. Indeed, I found the comparison insulting to both groups.  Such comparisons rarely work out well. (Recently, a Holocaust surviver recently denounced progressives for repeatedly comparing immigration centers to “concentration camps.”).

However, Coleman was expressing her opinion in the comparison and she should be free to do as an individual and as a faculty member.  Indeed, this is the type of statement that could have been used for a great debate and exchange on campus. I would not be surprised if Professor Coleman ultimately amended her comments or apologized in the course of such a dialogue. Even if she did not, this could have been a learning experience as faculty and students compare the two great historical injustices perpetrated against the Black and Asian communities.

Professor Coleman may have been trying to show empathy for the Japanese Americans in the camps with her comparison to the intolerable conditions of slavery. I can see why it was received as deeply insulting but we all have a need to try to give the benefit of such doubts to each other in our public discourse.

I understand the need to write a letter condemning such comments. In the not-so-distant past, university officials would have noted the protections afforded to such views under free speech and academic principles. It would have then facilitated a meeting or, even better, a forum to discuss such historical and political issues.  Those days seem to have now passed.

Campuses have become places of growing intolerance where faculty and students use speech regulations to seek to silence those with opposing views. We often seem like institutions populated by little Madam Dufarges eager to give testimony against those who offend us. The prior default was free speech. We would have passionate but civil debate.  Even extreme views were heard on campuses as part of our commitment to open and uninhibited thought and speech.  We now appear to be collective censors and accusers.

Any “harm” caused by Professor Coleman’s remarks pales in comparison to the greater harm of speech regulation and curtailment on our campuses.

155 thoughts on ““Either You Are Anti-Racist or Racist”: California Professor Put On Administrative Leave After Commenting On The Japanese Internment Camps”

  1. Who was the Supreme Court Justice who authored the Korematsu decision?
    He was new to the bench.

    1. It was authored by Justice Hugo Black. He’d been a SCOTUS Justice for a few years when he wrote it.

  2. Campuses have become places of growing intolerance where faculty and students use speech regulations to seek to silence those with opposing views.

    How is that possible JT? After all, you have devoted an enormous amount of time and energy writing about this. Your posts on the erosion of free speech in this country and elsewhere dominates the topics you write about and yet things are getting worse, not better. Actually, despite all of your scholarly efforts, we are experiencing a steady erosion of national unity, national identity, constitutional governance, and the overall security of rights. At what point do you believe the best way to leverage your talents would be in exploring the actual root cause of this decline, instead of reporting on the effects?

    Approximately 10 years ago, I facilitated a discussion in a Linkedin group asking one question: We have many problems, with many causes, but is there one root cause? While most discussions would run their course in a day or two, this discussion went on for over a year with about 1000 unique contributions. Civility rules were enforced. Trolls were banned. Opinions required sources and citations, and most importantly, original sources were encouraged. Early on, the usual suspected causes were identified and they were always followed up with the question; if that problem was fixed, would all other problems go away? After a year of this discussion, our group concluded we had 3 root problems that all had to be addressed equally and they all were centered on the U.S. citizen: 1. Civics ignorance 2. Apathy towards governance 3. Lack of self-reliance. After 10 years, those problems haven’t improved and I believe it’s because there exists a much deeper root cause preventing it: The Marxist/Leninist ideology that has metastasized throughout this country. If that isn’t dealt with first, then all we’re doing here is mowing weeds.

    1. Interesting discussion, Olly. I absolutely agree with the first two points, but think there is a good bit of abstraction in the third. I guess it depends on how ‘self reliance’ is defined because there isn’t a person on the planet who is truly one hundred percent self reliant.

      eb

      1. That’s a fair point EB and the lack of self-reliance root cause was the final leg of this 3-legged stool that was debated. It got fleshed out from a number of comments describing the various ways our citizens in this country had become increasingly dependent on government to solve any number of their problems. As much as we argued that solving 1 and 2 would diminish 3, we were always left with the impact of that dependency. Eventually, we considered it in the same way one would consider and treat other dependencies. So, you can teach people civics, you can get them engaged, but if you don’t shut off their dependency on government, then we’ll always have citizens hostile towards anyone they perceive is a threat to their supply. One more thing. This lack of self-reliance problem or dependence on our government is not just a domestic issue, but an international issue.

        1. Still think the reliance issue needs further defining. From what you’re saying it sounds like a reliance on government subsidy rather than just government singular?

          eb

          1. From what you’re saying it sounds like a reliance on government subsidy rather than just government singular?

            That’s correct EB. Think Federalist 51 and the point we aren’t angels.

          2. This is an interesting question. One can say we are virtually all dependent on others, but it is the type of dependence that counts. People like to get things for free, and the government wants to control people. That is a combination that can be lethal and leads to totalitarianism. That is one of the reasons behind our Federalist system. Except for those things specified in the Constitution, the rest is left for the States and the people.

            The left plays with fire using taxpayer dollars to bribe people into dependency. In part, the right acquiesces because many on the right are conservatives only until they get into office and have power. In the end, both parties pay off the lobbyists and big donor corporations. That is why a 54 Billion dollar bill is coming to a vote supporting chip manufacturers even though these chip manufacturers like Intel and AMD have done very well. These companies lobby by spending millions of dollars, only to receive billions in grants or special legislation.

            1. A perfect example of this type of dependency has been exploited by the Left (yes, conservatives are not immune from exploitation), was AOC’s “tragic” story about her Abuela’s deplorable living conditions after damage from the hurricane. She of course blamed Trump instead of doing whatever she could do personally. So in steps Matt Walsh to start a GoFundMe campaign for AOC’s grandmother. Within 24 hours it had raised $104k until GFM shut it down because the recipient told them they would not accept the funds. So it would appear AOC and/or her Abuela didn’t want “private” charity, but rather they were trying to make a political statement for the bigger prize, public assistance. Imagine how many families in Puerto Rico and elsewhere could have benefitted and still could benefit from these private initiatives.

    2. Olly, I like the three root problems, but I think there is a spiritual problem that I cannot define. I am not talking about organized religion. I think people are always looking for something to believe in. They can end up choosing the wrong thing. Today leftism has become spiritual in that for many, it acts like a faith-based religion

      1. I like the three root problems, but I think there is a spiritual problem that I cannot define.

        S. Meyers,
        That is a huge problem and we debated that issue. We determined that a comprehensive study of our founding would lead people to internalize the self-evident truths of our DoI and recognize their faith cannot be laid at the feet of those elected. Several years ago, David Corbin and Matt Parks at The Federalist ran a series of articles using modern day events and how they were related to the Federalist Papers. One of my favorites was the one I’ve linked below. It’s worth the read.

        A hundred years ago, the first group of progressives concluded that this country needed to change in a big way. They argued explicitly for a refounding of the United States on the grounds that the only absolute in political life is that absolutes are material and economic rather than moral in nature.

        Translating theory into practice, those thinkers and political storm troopers on the Right Side of History have increased the power of the state so as to produce the greatest amount of material pleasure and moral-ideational relief for society–to leave the populace, as Machiavelli put it, both “satisfied” and “stupefied.”…

        The best moral and political response to self-serving progressive cynicism is summarized by Madison near the end of Federalist 57:

        “If it be asked, what is to restrain the House of Representatives from making legal discriminations in favor of themselves and a particular class of the society? I answer: the genius of the whole system; the nature of just and constitutional laws; and above all, the vigilant and manly spirit which actuates the people of America — a spirit which nourishes freedom, and in return is nourished by it.”

        See how plainly and powerfully Madison asserts the fundamentally moral character of the American founding. Discriminatory laws violate the “genius” of our republic, its constitutional principles, and the natural rules of justice. That these ideals are not self-enforcing requires the introduction of the most important check on privilege: the people, guided by a “vigilant and manly spirit” nourishing and nourished by freedom.

        The political challenge of our day is the revival of that spirit among the American people–and those who champion this task, like those they champion, are anything but “insignificant.”
        https://thefederalist.com/2014/08/18/the-rise-of-progressive-oligarchy/

        1. “We determined that a comprehensive study of our founding would lead people to internalize the self-evident truths of our DoI and recognize their faith cannot be laid at the feet of those elected.”

          Olly, that statement indicates a fourth leg to the stool. Right?

            1. I don’t think so, Olly, because, throughout history, man has had a spiritual side.

              I am dealing with the realities of human nature along with human emotions. In part they are cost determiners when determining the benefit vs. cost in any comparison.

              1. I don’t think so, Olly, because, throughout history, man has had a spiritual side.

                You don’t have to think so, Seth. We thought so. How did that spiritual side workout throughout history (pre-enlightenment) to provide equal security of rights for all?

                Anyway, nothing is stopping you from putting 8 legs on that stool. You do you.

                I am dealing with the realities of human nature along with human emotions.

                Yeah, so did the framers and so did our group.

                1. 1. Civics ignorance 2. Apathy towards governance 3. Lack of self-reliance.

                  Olly, your most recent reply sounded as if you felt I was attacking you and your group. I wasn’t. I added my immediate thought. Spirituality has been a basis of human reliance throughout history. It can enhance self-reliance, which so happens to be your #3 even though very few people are self-reliant. I note that throughout history, man has relied on some form of spirituality.

                  Even the founding of this nation seems to have depended on some form of spirituality. The Marxist type destruction of this nation that we see today relies on spirituality as well. That is why some call it the left’s faith-based religion and attract those looking for something to place their faith on.

                  1. I like the three root problems, but I think there is a spiritual problem that I cannot define.

                    Seth, if you cannot define it, then identify the symptoms and perhaps then we can define it.

                    1. Olly, I note #3 is, lack of self-reliance. For the most part, man is not self-reliant. Frequently when faced with tremendous problems, man seeks to use all sorts of intangible things to work things through. Some utilize religion or make all sorts of promises. Others use some kind of spirituality. Still others blame capitalism and adopt the faith-based religion of leftism.

                      I don’t know a time in history when man didn’t have some spiritual relationship to the world he lives in.

                    2. Seth, lack of self-reliance was defined by our group as an increasing dependency on the government to do the things we have the natural right to do ourselves. In the extreme, total self-reliance would be man living in the state of nature. Conversely, total dependency would be government controlling every aspect of your life. The framers constructed a constitution to define the limits of what government should do. The rest was up to the citizen. Self-reliance then is defined by the citizen being willing and able to maintain that balance. That balance is tangible. I would say spirituality, in all the various forms, will have an influence on that balance. Spirituality is an intangible until you measure it’s impact on that balance. Once the citizen understands their relationship to the tangible, constitutional balance, then they are prepared to see how their spirituality is aligned with their duty as a citizen.

                    3. “The rest was up to the citizen.”
                      That is where the problem lies Olly. We need honest people, not those that will support fraudulent elections and not those that place color in front of character.

                    4. Olly, after sending my last reply, I thought I should explain that I am not fin favor of increasing the number of legs to the stool. I was only providing another factor in life.

                      That third leg, self-reliance, is related to spirituality which helps people become more reliant on themselves or their community rather than some large mindless entity.

                    5. Seth, I agree that spirituality is for the most part an intangible belief system that will guide behavior. I good example of how I see spirituality working to guide citizens is in Mark 12, where Jesus instructs the Pharisees and the Herodians to render unto Caesar that which is Caesars, and to God what is God’s. The linked explanation of this story get’s to the point that governments will exist for a purpose that we need to understand and respect. Here is a part of it:

                      The Government and Our Civic Duty as Believers
                      This verse does NOT mean that we blindly go along with unjust laws, nor does it mean that we should avoid political involvement altogether. Nations benefit greatly from Godly people who are involved and active.

                      https://www.biblestudytools.com/bible-study/topical-studies/why-should-we-render-unto-caesar-what-is-caesars.html

  3. Off topic. What is a Bitcoin wallet? Is it some online account from which paper bitcoins get transfered? What is a Bitcoin? Should we substitute the first letter with letters sh?
    Don’t buy Bitcoins folks. Went in dumb, come out dumb too. Hustling round Russia in their alligator shoes.

    1. You’ve got to be taught
      To hate and fear,
      You’ve got to be taught
      From year to year,
      It’s got to be drummed
      In your dear little ear
      You’ve got to be carefully taught.

      You’ve got to be taught to be afraid
      Of people whose eyes are oddly made,
      And people whose skin is a different shade,
      You’ve got to be carefully taught.

      You’ve got to be taught before it’s too late,
      Before you are six or seven or eight,
      To hate all the people your relatives hate,
      You’ve got to be carefully taught!

      1. To put a little perspective on the lyrics that you quote, the are from Rogers’ and Hammersteins’ South Pacific which premiered in 1949 and was based on James Michener’s book Tales of the South Pacific. Both the book and the play were instant hits. Both were far ahead of their times but their reception and continuing fame are arguments against the allegations that the U.S. is a systemically racist society and help to demonstrate just how far our country has moved in dealing with racism since these works were first produced.

        1. But Ray, unfortunately, we have come only so far as to now have blatant racism against whites……formerly called reverse racism….The Left believes it’s productive to actively turn whites into shame-laden lemmings who hate the color of their own skin, and act only out of guilt.
          This society engaged in that kind of bigotry before …..How did that work out for everybody??
          .Racism is racism….period!
          BTW, Finnian’s Rainbow is another 1940’s “ahead of its time” Broadway musical about race. Great show!

  4. Frist, I doubt that Coleman ever visited an internment camp. The camps were closed immediately after the war, some 75 years ago. If Coleman ever went to one of the camps, she wouldn’t be old enough to remember it. For that matter, the camps were justified. The United States and Japan were at war and in spite of large numbers of Japanese having become US citizens, their loyalties were divided, as evidenced by the numbers who proclaimed their disloyalty in questionnaires. By the way, Germans and Italians were also interned, although not in the numbers Japanese were. After all, Japan had just attacked Hawaii and the US feared she might attack the West Coast (there were a handful of small-scale attacks, such as a submarine shelling an oil refinery.) There’s no doubt that large numbers of Japanese in the US were Japanese agents (there were also Japanese in Japan who were US agents.) As for the Underground Railroad, it wasn’t organized by slaves, it was set up by white abolitionists in defiance of the US government which had decreed that slaves were property and anyone who helped them escape was a felon. It’s purpose was to help escaped slaves make their way to Canada. Incidentally, it’s effectiveness has been greatly exaggerated. Only a few thousand at most ever escaped. There were still more than 4 million slaves in the South at the end of the War of Northern Aggression.

    1. In the Owens Valley in California the Manzanar National Historic Monument is the site of one of the internment camps that can still be visited though little remains of the actual camp. One can see that even today with more development in the valley the camp hardly needed fences. Like the old Yuma Territorial Prison, if you walk out it is very hard to go anywhere without outside assistance.

      A Democrat administration built the camps and held American citizens in them. Sometimes it is hard to distinguish Democrats from totalitarians in other countries.

    2. From South Pacific the musical.

      You’ve got to be taught
      To hate and fear,
      You’ve got to be taught
      From year to year,
      It’s got to be drummed
      In your dear little ear
      You’ve got to be carefully taught.

      You’ve got to be taught to be afraid
      Of people whose eyes are oddly made,
      And people whose skin is a different shade,
      You’ve got to be carefully taught.

      You’ve got to be taught before it’s too late,
      Before you are six or seven or eight,
      To hate all the people your relatives hate,
      You’ve got to be carefully taught!

    3. I never thought I’d be agreeing with you, but your post is correct. Kudos. The Underground Railroad was set up and ran by abolitionists, not slaves, most of whom were illiterate and wouldn’t know whom to contact in the North, where to go or how to get there. Some of them may have helped conduct groups on various legs of the journey, but slaves didn’t establish the Underground Railroad. Escaping slaves were hidden in basements, fruit cellars or hidden rooms in homes along the way, and the abolitionists are the ones who set this up. I also agree that unless Coleman is quite elderly, she never saw the internment camps. Are there any surviving examples? After the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US went into full knee-jerk mode, but after the war, the camps were a national disgrace. Weren’t they dismantled rather promptly? In retrospect, this was a shameful thing to have done, but I wasn’t around then, and hindsight is always 20/20. There were pro-German Bund organizations all over America during the war, too.

      I think the big issue with Coleman is that she doesn’t know what the hell she’s talking about. Just on the issue of the Underground Railroad, her facts are wrong, and that makes the college look bad. That’s not even addressing her position that racism must be a binary choice–either for or against, which is a philosophical, not factual matter. Many people take others who are different at face value, and aren’t entrenched either way.

      1. There is an existing Japanese internment camp at Heart Mountain between Cody and Powell Wyoming. Very educational visit.

    4. I want to imprison members of the MIC and their warmongering sycophants to liberate the several trillions of dollars allegedly designated for defense. After their convictions for treason I want to sell all their personal property to the highest bidders. I want the God damned CIA budget made public . I want the current POTUS to file felony US charges against all the CIA and military scum bags whom committed multiple felony murders and torture and turn them to convict Dick “Satan” Cheney, then turn the lot of them over for international war crime convictions.

      Is that asking too much?

    5. {“By the way, Germans and Italians were also interned, although not in the numbers Japanese were.”}

      Most all of the Germans and Italians interred during WW 2 were German or Italian nationals, not American citizens. The number of U.S. citizens interred with German or Italian heritage was infinitesimally low.

    6. “For that matter, the camps were justified.”

      Seriously?!

      Collective punishment based on an individual’s ethnicity?! That is tribalism, not the American system of individual justice.

  5. This dimwitted professor shouldn’t be censored (it’s good to know your resident racist which she so clearly is) but whomever credentialed this numbnut should. I see CRT circling the drain.

    1. Whoever credentialed you should have checked that you understood the difference between subject pronouns and object pronouns and that you could correctly choose which to use.

      1. Your peasant/pedantic criticism, similar to some made against JT, alters the principal points made not a whit.

        However, rather than showing clever, it makes you something of a human mosquito.

      2. Afoolyious:

        When you have no substance to your rebuttal you have to become the Grammar Police. I get it. Congratulations! You’ve reached the Know-Nothing But Nothing Zone! BTW, the grammar’s fine, Officer Fife!

  6. “. . . why the prisoners there “did not just leave,” given how small the fence was.”

    The more pressing question is:

    Why didn’t Americans break the shackles of their internment during the fascist Covid “lockdowns?”

    1. “Why didn’t Americans break the shackles of their internment during the fascist Covid “lockdowns?”

      Sam, that is one of the most important questions to ask. It needs to be discussed. If no one cared enough, then we will have some type of dictatorship in around 20 years. On the other hand, if Americans like to do the right thing (even though the policies were wrong) and not cause strife, maybe we can return to a Constitutional Republican government.

      I am pretty pessimistic. I think in terms of entropy.

    2. There was no internment during Covid.

      Are you also one of the people who agrees with MTG that having to wear a face mask on the House floor is comparable to Nazis requiring Jews to wear a yellow star during the Holocaust?

      1. “There was no internment during Covid.”

        In a way you are correct.

        “Stay at home” diktats, the shuttering of schools, the “lockdown” of businesses, the destruction of civil liberties, the compulsory wearing of a mask — imposed by force on *healthy* individuals — is more akin to totalitarianism than to a mere internment.

        1. BS.

          I live in a state that had a stay at home order. I was free to go for walks, to go to the grocery store, to go to the doctor’s, to go to the bank, to donate blood at the Red Cross, to pick up items on hold at the library, to drive or take public transportation, … I was not forcibly removed from my home. I did not have any of my possessions taken by the government.

          Do you know anyone who was interned? I did (he’s since passed away). He and his family could not do any of the things I just listed, they were forcibly removed from their home, and most of their belongings were taken.

          “the compulsory wearing of a mask”

          People are compelled to wear clothes covering their genitals (and for women, their breasts) in most public places. Do you consider that totalitarianism too?

          Hundreds of thousands of Americans died from Covid, and even more have serious longterm health complications. Had the measures you object to not been taken, even more would have been effected.

          1. “I was not forcibly removed from my home. I did not have any of my possessions taken by the government.”

            The word interned has a broader meaning both from Merriam Webster and politically. Closing the doors of one’s business impounds property and prevents one from providing for his family and himself. When one discriminates against that individual by permitting select businesses to offer the service he previously provided, one descends further into the depths of being interned. Add to that leadership that dismisses the rules for themselves.

            Though your property might not have been formerly taken away, you are relying on a personal anecdote. You don’t wish to recognize that not only were people denied their property (business) but that it was forever taken away from them by government action when the property ended up in a bankruptcy situation.

            Sam is entirely correct when he says, “is more akin to totalitarianism than to a mere internment.”

          2. “Had the measures you object to not been taken, even more would have been effected.”

            And your proof is?

            “Effected” (sic) is not the issue. Mortality rate is.

            The actual evidence proves just the opposite. See that states (Texas, Florida, S. Dakota, et al.) that had minimal or no lockdowns, and that eased their lockdowns early. And see Sweden.

            There never was any science behind universal lockdowns of *healthy* people who are in low-risk categories. In fact, they caused a constellation of physical and psychological problems. But when there’s a monomaniacal focus on one virus, all other harmful consequences are simply ignored. That is the evil of the intrinsic theory of value.

            In principle, it is immoral and unjust for the government to lockdown, quarantine, shut down *healthy* individuals. As with criminal law — an individual is innocent until proven guilty — so, too, in health law — an individual is healthy until proven infected.

            As for those politicians who compelled the lockdowns: Some were sincere. And they were misled by power-lusting creatures such as Fauci. Others, such as Newsom, Whitmer, and Cuomo, used Covid as an excuse to indulge their fascist fantasies.

            Americans need to be saved from those “saviors” with a police force.

  7. Racism is a Democrat characteristic. Therefore, Democrats want to make racism the national theme.

    The other thing Democrats like to do is spend the taxpayer’s money by giving gifts to the richest of our companies.

    Instead of spending money on the oppressed, Democrats wish to give 54 billion dollars to chipmakers with record profits who spend millions on lobbying. (companies such as Qualcomm, Intel, and AMD) The bill doesn’t differentiate between foreign or domestic, so they probably want to give more money to the Chinese.

    1. Allan boldly makes a strong move to snatch away the title of most gullible person on the planet.

      1. Anonymous the Stupid, do you lack the knowledge to say what I am gullible about?

        Are you unaware of the Democrat plans to give 54 billion dollars to some of our wealthiest corporations that have greatly profited recently? Are you unaware that what the Democrats are doing can be construed as racist based on Democrat terms? The money is going to the rich white corporations and coming from the taxpayer that includes minorities.

  8. The word police are now being hoisted on their own petard. It just goes to show how flimsy their CRT argument really is, since they themselves can so easily be caught in their own web of fabricated racism and falsified history. Why are we allowing the most ignorant among us — albeit fully credentialed idiots — to lead the way on social issues?

  9. Why is it not racist to use words like “honky, cracker, whitey, white devil?” If someone utters the n word, does that necessarily prove that they hate all black people?

  10. Agree with you on free speech issues often, Turley. I do think we’d disagree on what constitutes the ‘yelling fire in a crowded theater’ variations though.

    But yes, this shouldn’t have resulted in a firing. Would’ve served much better as a place to launch discussion.

    I went to high school in Denver in the mid to late 70’s. Forced bussing and all the serious racial tensions and violence that sometimes arose in those situations. I’ll never forget American history class, taught through one of those text books that existed because it somehow passed the muster of the biggest districts in Texas that ensured said text book would be a profitable endeavour for the publisher. We came to the ‘How the West Was Won’ chapter and all hell broke loose. My class of nearly 40 consisted of black, white, hispanic, american indigenous, and the children of children whose parents had been interned during WWII in Colorado and then stayed to work the sugar beet fields afterward…

    Let’s just say the discussion was lively over which version of history accurately portrayed events on the ground.

    eb

  11. Looks like some activists in the Asian community have contracted “offenditis”, a crippling disease that can cause its victims to devote bandwidth to being offended by speech. If this disease spreads to the larger Asian community, it could be the start of its decline.

  12. There is no ‘great harm.’ Stop encouraging these idiots. Having said that, she deserves what she gets bc she bought into this madness and is now reaping the benefits. Of course it should be protected speech, but if you opt out of free speech protection, as these morons on campus have, then you get what you deserve.

  13. Looks like activists in the Asian community have contracted the disease, “offenditis”. I hope this does not spread to the larger Asian community, where up until now, it has not been devoting bandwidth to what someone says..

  14. Instead, some members of the community brought a formal complaint.
    A couple of wokes wimperng in the corner, does not equal a group suffering harm.

    1. Not yet. That’s what most people said about *all* of this 10-15 years ago, when it began to rear its head beyond the fringe. We remain willfully blind and willfully cowardly. So much more important to be liked and rich.

  15. Have to admit to a certain schadenfreude.

    Been warning for a long time that the revolution always eats its young.

    I doubt that Ms. Coleman would have shown much mercy to a similar transgression against blacks.

  16. It’s up the University to “prove” harm. I don’t see it. absent the Streisand Effect, nobody would be aware of any of this.

    In a more sane analysis, why do words in passing carry such heightened weight?
    Since the world is all about Trump, this is a good comparison. President Trump has been in business for +5 decades. His enemies lable him racist but cant find any examples in in lifes work to support the accusation…baseless accusation.

    The reality should be decades of actions cannot be pushed aside by words uttered in passing. Extemporaneous utterances are a terrible way to evaluate a persons character.

    1. Because these children were raised to be that way by parents that were equally closed-minded and fragile in their own ways. It is indeed being passed on to newer generations. This all happens at home *first* in one way or another. Now, as then, no one wants to talk about it. I can only imagine the level of insulation the current shocked among us enjoyed before, when this had already been all glaringly apparent for some time.

  17. During World War Two, this illegal detention was a federal policy enacted by a liberal Democrat president that was very close allies with Canada. Where would these innocent Japanese-Americans flee to? They couldn’t even flee to Canada and it was federal U.S. policy by the most liberal Democratic president.

    1. Unfortunately, the “woke” have neither knowledge of nor use for actual history. They live in a world fabricated from their own fears and hatred. They truly believe that history is what they say it is. No evidence necessary. Identity politics isn’t based on reality, it’s based on herd mentality and a desire for revenge.

      1. Well said. I would add that they are so focused on the past and blaming current generations for any crimes of the past. And they have no vision for a better future despite their delusions of utopia. Welcome to the Idiocracy.

    2. This is true! I suspect that, if its precepts weren’t so universally reviled globally, a great many ‘Progressives’ back then would have openly supported the Nazi party. It’s insanity. I did not used to feel this way.

      1. The left was involved in the creation of the Nazi Party. The intellectual individual behind Italian fascism, Giovani Gentile, was a socialist.

        Our friends on the blog with loud voices are not dissimilar to the Nazis or Italian fascists.

        The Nazis adopted some of our leftist cultures. For example, they investigated Democrat racism against blacks observing how the racists determined who was black. They also took great interest in eugenics likewise promoted by racists.

        If we were immersed in Wokeism, then as we are now, they would have invariably incorporated our Wokeism into how they ruled over the German people and the nations they conquered.

        1. S. Meyers,
          I heard Dan Bongino today refer to CRT, not as Critical Race Theory, but rather Critical Racism Training. That is exactly what these Leftists are pumping out today and across America, more and more people are becoming woke to it and rejecting it.

        2. “Our friends on the blog with loud voices are not dissimilar to the Nazis or Italian fascists.” -S. Meyer

          And that, my friends, is how he got his name:

          Stupid Meyer

          1. Anonymous the Stupid, we once went over the isms and you thought fascism was good for the little guy. You can’t help but be stupid.

            1. Stupid Meyer lies: “…we once went over the isms and you thought fascism was good for the little guy.”

              Stupid Meyer spins another yarn.

              1. This is not a yarn. It is the truth. Others might remember the discussion. We had a long discussion of some of the characteristics of socialism, nazism and fascism. Big government, control of the press, industry and government working together (for socialism until the Marxist dream ended the state). Maybe you have learned a bit more since then and are now embarrassed.

                1. This is how Allanonymous rolls…, spins…, and lies… He’s not an honest broker.

                  Maybe the anonymous figure who was involved in that “long discussion” will come forward — but, In the meantime, and probably forever, Stupid Meyer will keep playing his non-productive games.

                  I’m not the least bit embarrassed, but Allanonymous Meyer should be.

                  1. S. Meyer was probably having another one of his conversations with himself. With a few exceptions, most people seem to avoid him.

                    1. It seems you are responding to one of your pretend friends, or you are the pretend friend responding to Anonymous the Stupid. Therefore let me fill you in since your personality is split into numerous smaller ones that are not good at communicating.

                      Anonymous the Stupid, we once went over the isms and you thought fascism was good for the little guy. You can’t help but be stupid.

                      This is not a yarn. It is the truth. Others might remember the discussion. We had a long discussion of some of the characteristics of socialism, nazism and fascism. Big government, control of the press, industry and government working together (for socialism until the Marxist dream ended the state). Maybe you have learned a bit more since then and are now embarrassed.

                  2. “Maybe the anonymous figure who was involved in that “long discussion” will come forward ”

                    Maybe, maybe not. If another does come forward, will it be one of your pretend friends or even you? Will it be another person that decides to don the Anonymous name? No one will ever know for sure, but the evidence points to you. Even your rhetoric of recent times informs us how near your ideas are to those ideas expressed at that time.

                    I understand your embarrassment.

  18. I agree that she has the right to say what she did, however, poorly phrased and uninformed as it might have been. Still, it is wondrous to see Karma at work

  19. Why is she an educator in the first place? What of value can she possibly teach and student possibly learn from her? I value free speech, too, and don’t disagree with Prof. Turley’s viewpoint. Yet this “buttonhead” (a wonderful word used by the Richard Hannay character in Hitchcock’s class “The 39 Steps”) has no place teaching anything or anyone.

    1. That IS what she considers to be value. Many of us have a tendency to project onto others at times, it is not just the woke; in this case it’s a projection of good intentions. We really need to cease taking anything for granted. Nothing is ever a given. We all got lazy.

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