Moldrin: Johnson and Johnson Recalls Over-The-Counter Drugs Over Possible Contamination

McNeil-PPC, a division of Johnson and Johnson has recalled Tylenol, Motrin, Benadryl, and other drugs after complaints over an “unusual moldy, musty or mildew-like” odor. There were also complaints over stomach problems, including nausea, stomach pain, vomiting or diarrhea.

It appears that the smell is due to a chemical called “2,4,6-tribromoanisole (TBA).” TBA is applied to the wooden pallets that are used to transport and store packaging materials. Some of the drugs showed contamination with TBA. The recall covers junior strength Motrin, children’s Tylenol grape meltaway tablets, extra strength Tylenol, extra strength Tylenol rapid release gelcap, extra strength Tylenol PM geltab, Motrin caplets, extra strength Rolaids fresh mint tablets and St. Joseph Aspirin chewable orange tablets.

For more information on the lots covered in the recall, consumers can call 1-888-222-6036 for log on to

For the full story, click here.

8 thoughts on “Moldrin: Johnson and Johnson Recalls Over-The-Counter Drugs Over Possible Contamination

  1. This is not the only thing that has hit this company lately:

    The FDA (Still) Hates Antibiotic Makers
    By Brian Orelli
    December 31, 2009 |

    “To be blunt, we don’t really believe your data.”

    That was basically the sentiment out of the Food and Drug Administration yesterday, as Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) announced that the agency had nixed the application for the antibiotic ceftobiprole.

    A little more than a year ago, the FDA turned down ceftobiprole, requesting “additional audit work of clinical investigator sites and to address specific questions related to site monitoring.” It seems Johnson & Johnson’s answers to the FDA’s questions weren’t compelling enough; the agency wants Johnson & Johnson to complete new trials to prove that ceftobiprole works.

    And it only gets worse from here.

    If anyone wants to know what the saying”when it rains it pours”this is real close.

  2. I don’t want to beat a dead horse,but with the above post.This is what really jumps off the page at you.

    “”The complaint states that Johnson & Johnson knew Omnicare pharmacists reviewed the charts of nursing home patients at least once a month, then made recommendations to physicians on what drugs patients should be getting. The complaint alleges J&J knew physicians accepted those recommendations more than 80 percent of the time and states that J&J considered those pharmacists an “extension of (J&J’s) salesforce.”

  3. rafflaw,

    I was thinking the same thing. I being a observer of conspiracy theory’s think that you might have a point.

  4. The drug companies are far from the compassionate scientists their ads paint them to be. Statin anti-Cholesterol medication for instance, is highly overpriced and over prescribed to the point that one wonders if Doctors win prizes for prescriptions written. Since the days of Reagan the government has not fulfilled its’ role to oversee the drug companies and acted more the cheerleader than the investigator.

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