School Allows High School Student To Continue To Play Football After Being Criminally Charged With Rape

In Michigan, parents are outraged by the decision of a high school to allow senior Mitchell Landis to continue to play football after he was arrested and charged with rape. They insist that such arrests could constitute a violation of “good behavior” standards.


Landis is charged with two counts of criminal sexual conduct in the third degree, which would land him in jail for up to 30 years (though that is unlikely since such charges usually run concurrently with a maximum of 15 years). He has posted bail and resumed football for the school.

We previously saw a case in Texas of a cheerleader who was dropped from her team when she refused to cheer for a football player she accused of rape.

The mother of the victim says that the girl was raped at a friend’s house by Landis. After she went to police, she says that two men later grabbed her and raped her again in the woods. She reportedly tried to commit suicide.

The question is whether, given the presumption of innocence, the player should not be removed from the team until his guilt is proven. In this case, the police and prosecutor felt that there was sufficient evidence to bring two criminal charges. That would make this more than a simple allegation of “bad behavior” under school rules.

Source: WWMT

61 thoughts on “School Allows High School Student To Continue To Play Football After Being Criminally Charged With Rape

  1. Come on! We all know sports builds character.

    I was doing a gig in Blair Nebraska after the huge scandal about rapes, robberies, burglaries and general mayhem broke over their national championship football team. I was having breakfast in a local cafe, surrounded by farmers and local businessmen – you know, salt of the earth, decent, flag decal on the pickup truck, Christian Americans. They knew why this was happening, there was not a single dissenter in the place. This was all the fault of the Eastern Media who couldn’t stand Nebraska being champions.

    America is a very religious nation – that religion is sports. Just win baby!

  2. If this happened in Texas, the ‘trial’ and acquittal would be underway already. And….If he was any good at fullback, a scholarship committee would also be forming to lobby TCU for an opening.

    Alas…. in MI, the kid just keeps on playing. Life is so unfair.

    Oh slap, there was a female victim!? In a rape case??….
    Whooda thought?

  3. The accused’s game stats might shed light on the decision to let him play. If he’s usually an asset to the team, it still looks despicable. But if he’s a career benchwarmer, the decision might have been based on presumption of innocence, no matter how misguided it was to ignore the grounds for the charge.

    There is no excuse not to take the matter seriously, but it’s important to know whether those in charge are actually evil, or just irresponsible fools.

  4. I would think that his presumption of innocence would suffice to say he should be able to participate in any school activity. I would not be happy about it, but he has not been judged as gulity of those charges so he should be allowed to participate.

  5. “The question is whether, given the presumption of innocence, the player should not be removed from the team until his guilt is proven.”

    **********************

    Rape is an allegation easliy made and difficult to prove. Likewise, it is one that carries a stigma for both accuser and accused regardless of the result in court. These are both true and sad statements. I’ve seen both sides of these cases and the truth is sometimes near impossible to decipher except in the most eggrgious so-called “stranger rape” cases of which this may be one. Throw in Rape Shield Laws and you add another level of complexity and protection as well as a hurdle for the defense. I have no idea as to the truth of this allegation of rape nor the likelihood of success by the prosecution–and I bet they are not telling.

    Under the circumstances here and in spite of my belief in the principle of innocence until proof of guilt, I’d ban Landis from extracurricular activities. The shocking battery of the victim by two masked individuals and the suicide attempt suggest (but do not prove) the credibility of her story. At this point, the risk of danger to others outweighs his presumption of innocence and his privilege to play on the team. I’d not give into thuggery even if they can run a 4.3 40-yard dash or bench 400 lbs.

  6. If Landis is guilty I hope he gets similar payback in prison. However, the story doesn’t give enough detail for me as an observer to make any presumption. A rape kit test was performed but no results were given in the article. Was there semen? If there was what does the DNA show? Was there bruising of any kind? We don’t know. That being the case he is presumed innocent until proven guilty and should be allowed to play.

    I don’t politically like the importance placed on high School football and believe many seamy things are done in the name of winning. Nevertheless, the presumption of innocence is one of our most important criminal law principles (if not the most important). It has always suffered too much erosion from early publicity and public angst over a given crime.

  7. Mike,

    Unfortunately in most rape cases…it is a he said she said….But it is usually an easy victory for the Prosecutor….

  8. JT:

    I don’t see where she was raped again after the initial complaint. The langugage suggests she was “beaten up” after being dragged into the woods by two hooded persons in a crude but effective effort to intimidate her just before the preliminary hearing.

  9. “At this point, the risk of danger to others outweighs his presumption of innocence …” Has some one been plagiarizing John Yoo?? :)

    Also, is there a fear he’s going to bugger some one on the grid iron??

  10. Tonight… for anyone in the NYC area who might be interested:

    She Asked For It: How Rape Myths Hurt Us All
    Wednesday, September 14, 6:00 PM

    Two cops are acquitted of rape. The DSK case falls apart. A former sportscaster buys a 14-year old girl for sex and gets community service. A high school orders one of its students to pay its legal fees after she filed a ‘frivilous’ lawsuit for being forced to cheer for a classmate who admitted to sexually assaulting her. From courtrooms to hospital exam rooms, from police precincts to college campuses, how do stereotypes about rape fuel the epidemic of rape and impact a survivor’s ability to get justice? Join our discussion and ignite change.

    RSVP: 212.627.9895 | contact@nownyc.org
    Suggested Donation: $5 NOW members & students | $15 non-members |

    Special Guests:
    Helen Benedict, novelist and journalist, she has covered the issue of rape around the world. She authored Sand Queen, a novel of the Iraq War, The Lonely Soldier, about women in the military, and Virgin or Vamp: How the Press Covers Sex Crimes, an analysis of the way sex, race and class bias affect rape coverage.

    Karen Carroll, Associate Director of the Bronx Sexual Assault Response Team, is a forensic specialist and survivor who trains police departments, DA’s offices and social service professionals, and testified in the NYPD rape trial of Moreno and Mata.

    Jane Manning, President of NOW-NYC, is a long-time New York City activist who has worked extensively to improve the criminal justice system’s response to sex crimes. She is a former sex crimes prosecutor.

    Nancy Schwartzman, filmmaker, activist and survivor, and creator of The Line Campaign—a non-profit organization and movement empowering young leaders to create a world without sexual violence.

    John Stoltenberg is the creator of Men Can Stop Rape’s “My Duty” campaign, a sexual-assault-prevention media campaign, which was licensed to the U.S. Department of Defense and distributed on military bases around the world. John is also the DC Rape Crisis Center communications consultant.

    Location: Pace University – Lecture Hall South, Room 130, One Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038 (corner of Frankfort & Park Row)
    Subways: R to City Hall | 4, 5, 6, 6X to Brooklyn Bridge/City Hall | J, Z, A, C, 2, 3 to Fulton St

  11. At this point, the risk of danger to others outweighs his presumption of innocence and his privilege to play on the team. I’d not give into thuggery even if they can run a 4.3 40-yard dash or bench 400 lbs.~Mespo
    ——————————————-
    yes, thank you

    and thuggery it is…designed to intimidate….designed to ‘buy time’….designed to shut someone up. It is a double and triple dose of violence in the hopes of not having to deal with the initial violence.

  12. Food for thought…

    http://www.alternet.org/story/152140/cop_rapes_woman_at_gunpoint,_11-year-old_rape_victim_smeared,_accuser_sued_for_$2_million:_is_us_society_failing_victims?page=entire

    August 23, 2011

    Cop Rapes Woman at Gunpoint, 11-Year-Old Rape Victim Smeared, Accuser Sued for $2 Million: Is US Society Failing Victims?

    by Sarah Seltzer

    “Where justice and authority let victims down, solidarity, activism, and a massive effort to create awareness will have to fill the breach.”

  13. In the United States of America, an accused is innocent till proven guilty by a jury of their peers. Condemnation of an individual before trial is the worst thing imaginable in our system (i.e. condemnation of a potentially innocent person), and this does not change with the type of crime or with the age of the accused. Also, the idea that the risk this teenager posses to others outweighs the presumption of innocence approaches the line of absurdity.

  14. @John Weber, ‘approaches the line of absurdity??? Ignoring that the incident may indeed have happened is what is absurd. To allow the continuation of an extra-curricular activity while the girl is hospitalized after being (possibly) raped and decidely terrorized is rank denial and further abuse and erosion of HER rights. For what? football?, don’t be an ass.

  15. I forgot in this country that we do not care about the accused’s rights and only care about the accuser’s. I wasn’t aware that we made this change to our justice system. Thanks for informing me everybody!

  16. I’d wait for the trial. Like it or not, high school football is an important venue to college scholarships or pro-money.

    That said, I’m okay with banning the kid now on one proviso: if he is acquitted AND the accusation found to be malicious, the prosecutor who brought the case to trial is fired.

  17. Mespo,
    I agree with your statement until your section recommending that the accused be punished by banning him from extracurricular activities. Isn’t that prejudging him as guilty? I have no problem if the school and authorities took steps to keep him under lawful surveillance, but he is still innocent until the judge or jury state otherwise.

  18. I’m swingin’ back in the other direction…. We need someone like Ali Soufan to question the young man, I think… ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Soufan )

  19. What is the purpose of such a ban?

    To punish him?
    To satisfy the community?
    To make the school safer?

    How does banning him from extracurricular activities differ from banning him from expected curricular activities?

    It seems to me that banning him from extracurricular activities prior to the trial only demonstrates this is a ban to punish him and to satisfy the community and not a ban that serves any other purpose like making the school safer.

  20. If the linked article is correct in the statement regarding the Athletic Code:

    “The Quincy Schools Athletic Code says that student-athletes “must be in good standing with the laws of society.””

    then taking an action like benching or suspending a player would be appropriate whether it’s for an alleged murder or a ticket for DUI or littering. This player doesn’t seem to be in good standing with the laws of society even though he hasn’t been convicted of anything yet so it would seem to me that benching him or suspending him would be in accordance with the letter of the Code.

    The Athletic Dept. needs to remain consistent with its past practice and if that past practice is to do nothing, then they need to change their code to reflect that.

  21. “In the United States of America, an accused is innocent till proven guilty[.]”

    Not exactly.

    One is PRESUMED innocent. If he raped her, he is guilty and has been since the offense. The presumption does not require that he be treated as if he is indeed innocent. The presumption merely kicks in certain due process safeguards. This is not semantics.

    Indeed, as things stand today legally, it is more probable than not that he did indeed commit rape. The state has already restrained his liberty. He is out on bail, terms of which undoubtedly impose a curfew and restrict movement.

    There are large numbers of individuals cooling their heels in jail today because they can’t make bail or were denied bail; they sure aren’t being treated as if they are innocent.

    Whether this young man should be allowed to play football or even to go to school is one thing; whether the PRESUMPTION of innocence requires it is altogether a separate matter.

  22. Habeas Corpus Act? Just because he`s been charged, doesn`t mean he is guilty. I think some rights are being broken here.

    Plus I really don`t see how this ban helps anyone, it just helps stigmatise him more.

  23. Ron Jackson1, September 14, 2011 at 3:22 pm :….The presumption does not require that he be treated as if he is indeed innocent. The presumption merely kicks in certain due process safeguards. This is not semantics…..
    ——————————————-
    this sounds reasonable and least likely to undermine the law.

  24. rafflaw:

    I would ban him from all but educational opportunities. He has no right to participate in extracurricular activities and his presence injects an element of dangerousness into those activities totally out of proportion to the exercise of his privilege to play. Given the heinous nature of the crime alleged; the alleged retribution against the purported victim just prior to the preliminary hearing; the chilling effect on other possible victims caused by his release on bail and his relatively unfettered inclusion in the school population; and the proximity of this student to other students including females at times without the full compliment of adult supervision during the day, I would have no problem restricting his participation until the charges are tried.

  25. Ron Jackson:

    “One is PRESUMED innocent. If he raped her, he is guilty and has been since the offense.”

    *******************

    That depends on what you mean by “guilty.” He may be morally guilty since the consumation of the criminal act, but he is not legally guilty until the judicial process is completed and his culpability is determined by a trier of fact.

    The notion of bail presupposes innocence but takes into account the possibility of error therein and balances the liklihood of dangerousness of the accused, the risk of flight to avoid prosecution, and the risk of danger to the public with the accused’s right to be free to participate in the defense of his case and to go about his business while the case is pending.

  26. John Weber:

    ” Also, the idea that the risk this teenager posses to others outweighs the presumption of innocence approaches the line of absurdity.”

    *******************

    New Jersey Judge Bradley Ferencz may disagree with your characterization. The new victim probably does too:

    http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2011/04/judge_raises_bail_to_1m_after.html

    If it’s any consolation, 21 year-old Montana resident, Chaz Fregien, probably agrees with your assessment. No word yet on the opinion of the second rape victim:

    http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/news/article_2749294c-6ea7-11df-b630-001cc4c03286.html

  27. I guess, then, that they are saying “football” and rape are not mutually exclusive.

    We are not talking soccer here, then, when we say football.

    I guess the metaphorical expanded version of this story is the rape of the American people, the charges, and the continuation of the game out into the glory daze.

    I guess some people were just born to be raped, eh?

  28. Mespo,
    I understand your argument, but preventing him from any activity that an “innocent” student can partake in is a form of punishment. We will have o agree to disagree.

  29. http://www.wwmt.com/articles/quincy-1395829-superintendent-newschannel.html

    Quincy Superintendent responds to football player accused of rape
    September 14, 2011 5:36 PM

    Excerpts:

    Newschannel 3 has been told that police came to the school last Tuesday for Landis.

    “Does that say to others, we are guilty because we are arrested,” said Quincy Schools Superintendent Craig Artist. “We’re almost getting to the point that they’re guilty until proven innocent.”

    According to the school’s athletic code a student athlete must be in good standing with the laws of society. Artist says since Landis hasn’t been found guilty, he’s allowed to play.

    The school district says it’s trying to balance what’s best for Landis with what’s best for the rest of the students.

    “I hope people understand it might not be a personal decision, but organizational decision,” said Artist, “that we are careful about how we remedy the situation. We want to do that correctly and courageously.”

    A preliminary examination for Landis was scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, but was postponed. The superintendent says the decision about Landis could change depending on new information. (end of excerpts)

  30. All I know is that as of 2005 in the state of Michigan it is illegal for potential employers to ask about or consider arrests that did not lead to convictions.

    Now, I know that has nothing to do with this situation except, perhaps, there is some sort of law that should this kid go to trial and be acquitted, enables him to turn around and sue the School board for denying him the right to play football etc.? Without special wording in their code covering such instances, are they, the School Board, playing it safe?

    Perhaps someone familiar with Michigan law could give us an opinion.

  31. John Weber talks about one specific student, in the context of a school that allows that student, charged with a crime, to attend classes meaning they think he is not a safety risk.

    You tell him he’s wrong and bring in two completely different students with totally different circumstances. One is a guy charged with murder. The other is a 21 year old rapist, not a teenager, where the victim has a witness.

    So, in fact mespo, there is no connection. None. Nothing… Nada… Jack… Zip… Zilch… Bupkis. Love, A goose egg, Nought, Nix, Diddly squat. Nil. Divide by zero.

    Your point is expired. It is dead. It is a point kicked the bucket, ‘e’s shuffled off ‘is mortal coil, run down the curtain and joined the bleedin’ choir invisibile!! THIS IS AN EX-POINT!!

    However, assuming you are a lawyer, I can totally see you pounding the table on this.

  32. anon:

    Let me lay it out with flash cards for you. Weber says to assume that an accused rapist on bail represents a threat to other students (in his majestic words) “approaches the line of absurdity.” In less than a nanosecond of Googling, I pointed up some counter-examples of other youthful accused felons on bail who apparently continued on with their felonious ways after being admitted to court supervision. You may find the distinction between violent rape and violent murder persuasive, but neither I nor the common law notice much of a difference in terms of heinousness–one destroys the body; the other the spirit (as our purported victim sadly learned all too young). And perhaps you feel that a magical beam of enlightenment strikes you at age 21 as opposed to age 18 as was Master Landis, but most people don’t have that experience or that opinion.

    I also thought the juxtaposition of Weber’s foolish tautology against stark reality quite revealing of the weakness of his unsupported allegation of obvious innocuousness. I could have put it another way and asked him to volunteer his teenage daughter to escort the accused rapist around campus after dark given his clear eyed support of the footballer, but while that would have the benefit of making my point clear to you and your ilk, it was a tad simplistic and witless for most of the regulars here. From now on, I’ll limit myself in discussion to which you are privy to broad strokes of white and black to ensure your understanding of my argument. Maybe you can then find more videos of toy robots to rebut them. That should be fun.

  33. seamus:

    ““At this point, the risk of danger to others outweighs his presumption of innocence …” Has some one been plagiarizing John Yoo?? ”

    *******************
    You skalywag, you. :D There are no absolutes in this business. We are governed by reason and guided by principle. We are no slaves to platitudes, nor bound to foolishly consistent positions that would do us or the innocent harm assuming we are in a position to avoid it. Emerson had it right all along.

  34. mespo,

    I’m not sure if there is a magic beam of enlightenment, but if there it is likely the opposite of television. If they only had a name for such a device. Something that was perhaps reusable and transferable. Something that rhymes with “cooks” might be nice.

  35. if a teacher at this school were accused of molesting a student would they allow the teacher back into the classroom pending a guilty verdict?

  36. Mespo,

    Are you talking about the law when you mention the “business”? Or does the “business” just refer generally to bad things happening in life?

    Any judge setting a bond can issue a no contact order regarding the complaining witness. Cerfews, electric home monitering, and GPS monitering with a buffer zone around the alleged victim are all used in the jurisdiction where I practice. All of this protects a potential victim without taking away any work or educational opportunity. And yes, I think sports can be an educational opportunity. Highschool-aged defendants are almost universally required to continue going to school; perhaps not a picnic for an accused rapist.

    The sentiment in these posts seems to be that football is a “treat” and therefore should be taken away prior to a determination of guilt. I practice criminal law in both state and federal courts. Conditons of pretrial release are set to: 1) make sure a defendant doesn’t absence himself from the jurisdiction; and 2) to make sure the general public is not put needlessly in danger. Apparently the judge did no see this individual’s continued participation in football was likely to lead to a rape. Go figure. I suspect there are very specific requirements to his bond that he is to have no contact with the complaing witness. Still, bond and pretrial conditions are not meant to be punitive.

    What the experts (all members of the Order Of The Coif I’m sure) posting on this blog seem to want is punitive action against this person. What is an “absolute” under the United States and all state constitutions is that punishment comes after a finding of guilty, not before.

    The school district may have an honor code which seems to include a premise that one acused of a crime is presumed innocent until proven guilty. What a horrible civics leson for the students. I suppose what they should be taught is that sometimes the accusations are so horrible that we need to throw out the law to satisfy the mob. Throwing out the Constitution to appease an angry and frightened public has been very popular in this country for the last few of years. I’m sure John Yoo would agree with you that letting this kid play football makes him more likely to rape someone while on bond. But then again, he’s a facist moron.

  37. “Let me lay it out with flash cards for you. Weber says to blah blah blah, blahblahblahblah blah blah blah”

    Mespo, let me lay it out in magic marker scrawled on my buttocks for you.

    Weber said ” the risk **THIS** teenager” and spoke of the situation with one specific kid using information found in the article itself. You chugged down another half gallon of gallo, googled, and gagged up some random anecdotes of random other people whose sole connection was their similar number of chromosomes.

    Anyway, not all is lost, congratulations on figuring out how to create html links. Well done!

  38. seamus:

    “Try reading Emerson to the judge (or the Supreme Court) nest time you have a hearing on a criminal bond issue.”

    ****************

    Our judges are quite literate here and none would have let this kid anywhere near this alleged victim. Once she was beaten, most would have called this kid back in to determine if he met his requirement to keep the peace and be of good behavior. Not sure what happens in your bailiwick but judging for your comments I’m glad I’m in mine.

  39. anon:

    Weber knows this teenager about as much as you know the duties of the judge. By the way, stick to crayons for your scrawling it’s more your speed. As for my buttocks, it’s nice to know you care.

  40. Just because the story seems credible, doesn’t mean he should be banned from school activities. Presumption of the innocence, in my opinion, is not just a term for the courts. It’s a term Americans have become used to in their daily lives. What would this term mean if we instead decided to presume guilt before innocence outside of the courtroom on the basis of the argument that “risk to others outweighs interests of the charged”? Do we draw the line where the victim almost committed suicide…or where they just made an accusation…or when? Removing him from the game now is not just about eliminating the risk he poses – it’s making a statement that will reach beyond this case, this guy and this community. It tells this community and other communities that it is OK to chastise individuals as soon as a crime is alleged because they seem guilty. Communities might already do it informally. Putting the school authority behind it just makes that more acceptable.

    There is a reason we have a presumption of innocence and such a heavy burden of proof for guilt. Part of that reason is that we place a premium price on freedom and individual ability to pursue happiness. The prospect of this guy, if he is truly guilty, out in the open until trial worries me. But I think we should stick to our guns about why we decided to value these things and why we decided to presume innocence instead of the other way around..These values, for me, outweigh the risk to society posed by this guy continuing to play until proven guilty.

  41. Mespo,

    Are you seriously saying you would argue poetry and philosophy at a bond hearing? If so, let me know when you’re going to try it; I want to sell tickets. Also, unless there is an allegation that the defendant participated in or helped plan a subsequent attack, “most” judges would not hall the defendant back into court. Most judges, unlike yourself do not presume guilt. And while on the subject of your ass, you seemed to be awfully skilled at talking out of it my good man. You’ve clearly never practiced criminal law (any law?).

  42. “Removing him from the game now is not just about eliminating the risk he poses – it’s making a statement that will reach beyond this case, this guy and this community. It tells this community and other communities that it is OK to chastise individuals as soon as a crime is alleged because they seem guilty.”

    Flatteryourself has it right I think. From a local perspective it further insures the difficulty of this kid getting a fair trial and then in broader terms to the area as a whole. We know that the presumption of accusation and arrest held by a majority of people is one that the party arrested and charged is guilty. Unless the defendant is wealthy, there is also a imbalance of resources between the prosecution and the defense. In our legal system, despite legal guarantees to the contrary, defending against a criminal charge is an uphill battle. We simply don’t know if Landis is guilty from the facts I’ve tried to ascertain, therefore I believe the School District is acting correctly.

    Let me make my position clearer though. Besides murder I think that rape is perhaps the most horrible of common crimes. I’m also well aware of how women have been mistreated by the legal system when rapes have occurred. It is shameful and it has been callous throughout our nation’s history. However, one doesn’t redress abominations and distortions of justice, with other abominations that might see the innocent declared guilty.

    How quickly we forget the case of the Duke Lacrosse team and the rush to judgment against them?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duke_lacrosse_case

    Too me ANY rape is a hot button issue. The idea of someone committing it repels me to the core. At the same time though, the idea of a rush to judgment and premature stigmatization of the accused is an anathema to me, despite my strong feelings.

    “I also think it’s funny that we wish for rapists to be raped. How retardedly macho.”

    Seamus,

    Sorry, but I do believe in Karmic Justice and that is not macho. Macho is the fool who believes that the rape victim brought it on her(him)self. As for the appellation of “retarded”, I’ve been called worse.

  43. Quincy Superintendent responds to football player accused of rape
    WWMT
    September 14, 2011
    http://www.wwmt.com/articles/quincy-1395829-superintendent-newschannel.html

    Excerpts:

    QUINCY, Mich. (NEWSCHANNEL 3) – It’s a shocking crime that’s rocked a small community. A star football player accused of rape, the alleged victim a teen from another school.

    17-year-old Mitchell Landis was arrested last week, the charges he faces stem from a party back in August. The girl claims Landis forced himself on her.

    Now, many in the community are wondering why Landis is still in school and allowed to play football.

    On Wednesday Newschannel 3 put the tough questions to the district’s superintendent.

    Despite being accused of rape, Landis was out on the football field Friday night.

    Landis allegedly forced a teenage girl from another school to have sex at a party in late August.

    Newschannel 3 has been told that police came to the school last Tuesday for Landis.

    “Does that say to others, we are guilty because we are arrested,” said Quincy Schools Superintendent Craig Artist. “We’re almost getting to the point that they’re guilty until proven innocent.”

    According to the school’s athletic code a student athlete must be in good standing with the laws of society. Artist says since Landis hasn’t been found guilty, he’s allowed to play.

    *****

    A preliminary examination for Landis was scheduled for Wednesday afternoon, but was postponed. The superintendent says the decision about Landis could change depending on new information.

  44. seamus:

    “Are you seriously saying you would argue poetry and philosophy at a bond hearing?”

    *************

    No I argue logic, and, in case you missed it, poets and philosopher seem to have that and truth in abundance. As for arguing the great works before judge’s I have no such compunction. Darrow did it as did Lincoln and many others. Most of us are learned people and we respond to the wisdom of the past in dealing with the problems of the present. Don’t you?

    As for the comment about criminal law, i should tell you I did practice it as a young lawyer but found other outlets for my skills away from the sewer that it sometimes becomes.

  45. At my high school, simply being arrested for a serious crime would have risked expulsion, and probably would have resulted in suspension, and you certainly wouldn’t be putting on the uniform for a sport. Being criminally charged for something as serious as rape would have almost certainly gotten you kicked out.*

    Expelling a kid from a public school probably should be a high bar to get over, but allowing someone with criminal charges pending to wear the school’s uniform for a sport or similarly “represent” the school in public doesn’t seem like a good idea.

    (* Unless, of course, your dad was a major politician or big (actual/potential) financial contributor to the school. Still, rumor has it that when the son a certain internationally-known, recently-retired 2nd generation mayor of my fair city was busted at a house party with drinking and who knows what else, the school, um, let’s say, assisted him in finding a different school that might be a better fit for him academically where he could complete his high school education. Usually, the children of politicians who couldn’t hack it academically would be “accommodated” somehow, so I’m guessing that even if this kid wasn’t terribly bright, the arrest played a major role in his leaving the school.)

  46. Im very outraged! My daughters and many other younge beautiful girls attend Jonesville! What kind of example our they sending? They are telling our kids they are fine with the fact this boy has raped a younge girl as long as he plays good ball….. Wth is the world coming to? This poor younge girl needs everyone on her side! She was violated yet this boy walks free enjoying his freedom and sports!!! While that poor younge girl is being torchured mentally an physically! But he alks free! Hmmm! Makes ya wonder who his parents must know!

  47. Renee – your whole comment is written as if you are absolutely convinced that he raped someone. He was accused of rape. Don’t you think he should be given a chance to defend himself and be proven to have actually raped her? Or should we just eliminate that step as unnecessary and start to treat him as a rapist from the moment of the accusation? Maybe I am naive…but what if one of the beautiful girls of Jonesville was herself accused of rape? Would you feel the same? Or would you give her the benefit of the doubt you now refuse to give him?

    You are right in that what kind of ball he plays is irrelevant to this question. If he actually raped someone, the only balls he’ll be playing with are in prison. But don’t make lady justice out of yourself despite your very noble intentions.

  48. If there was sufficient evidence to bring charges, that should be taken seriously. Consider that if he were accused of any other felony, he would be suspended as well — not because of presumption of guilt, but because, until his name is cleared, there is a suspicion of guilt. This isn’t a court of law, and those rules don’t apply; school policy applies. He’s not being kicked off the team, his play is being suspended. Players get suspended for bad grades. I shouldn’t have to point out that being arrested is more serious.

  49. HELLO ALL – I AM FROM THE AREA OF THIS CRIME & KNOW THE ACCUSED PERSONALLY. So, for all you complete idiots that think he is a “threat” of the fricken football field, go screw yourselves. What is he gonna do? Rape someone on the field? Oh man, maybe he will murder someone. NO. He is, in fact, one of the absolute BEST people I have had the pleasure of meeting in my life. And I’m a girl, and I’ve been around this kid numerous times by myself, and look at me, not raped, just fine. He did not rape this girl. And he should not be punished for a crime he has not been convicted of. He is posing NO threat whatsoever at school when there are tons of people around. I also know the girl involved in the situation and funny how articles don’t release her background. She’s known around our parts as a compulsive liar. It’s like the little boy who cried wolf, except with this girl it’s always a hoax. The fact that she has tried to commit suicide after this does NOT make her story more believable for those of you who have used that as a point. In fact, it makes me think she is lying even more because she’s realizing that she made a stupid decision to accuse someone of something like this, something that ruins someone else’s life. This boy is scarred for life, his own family can’t even sit on the home side of the football stands to cheer on their son, I know, I’ve sat with them a couple weeks ago! It’s downright ridiculous the problems this is causing in the community. It has already ruined the boys life, so just let him be.

Comments are closed.