Day 6-7: Vermont

Today the Turleys venture out to see if we can find a moose and to experience more of Vermont. We will start again with breakfast in downtown Randolph, which serves up heaping piles of blueberry pancakes and its own Maple syrup. While it is snowing a bit, the temperatures are not bad (in the 40s) for venturing out into the woods.

Yesterday I gave my lecture on morality and the law at Vermont Law School. I spent most of the day with students and faculty, including speaking to the constitutional law class of Professor Cheryl Hanna. It was a terrific visit. Vermont Law School is a unique institution. Nestled in the hills around South Royalton, the campus is 13 acres and set just above the broad banks of the White River.
The oldest and centermost classroom building was built in 1892.

The school focuses on environmental law and the students are involved in a wide array of public interest activities. From their composting toilets to their intense energy conservation programs, the school is a model of environmentally correct living. The students also benefit for a large faculty that is incredibly close and accessible to their students. You can feel the positive energy in this place and the great affection between the faculty and students. The students also benefit from an array of innovative programs, including courses that take students through an array of practice exercises to train them for the real tasks of lawyering.

From the large rabbits living on the campus to the array of old wooden houses used for classes, Vermont Law School is an idyllic place for students to learn the law. It is also the perfect backdrop for one of the best environmental programs in the world.

While I was at the law school, Leslie and the kids went the the Ben and Jerry’s factory and had a wonderful time. They were making Milk and Cookies ice cream and gave them samples, which they loved. They then went around the small villages and the hills.

We finished the day at the Three Stallion Inn in Randolph. Every night we have returned to Morgan’s Pub. The pub is a warm and inviting place serving the best of the Vermont beers and cuisine (Leslie and I particularly liked Switchback beer made in Burlington, Vermont). We have developed an addiction to their onion rings and Frickles (fried pickles). We instantly bonded with the owner and “our” waitress at the pub, who have suggested an array of activities for the kids. Last night was trivia night and all of the locals came for an intense game of trivia. The Turleys did not exactly cover themselves with glory. We stunk at identifying modern music — a bit tough with a team composed of two uncool parents and kids with a music experience that ranged from Barney to Beiber. While we did not win any of the seven rounds, we had a ball. Everyone in the pub was friendly and having a great time.

I have always loved Vermont and this trip only reinforced that feeling. People here are universally nice and engaging. The entire state is gorgeous with deep forests and charming little towns. We will be reluctant to leave in the morning, but we still have one more day to explore the back roads of the Green Mountain state.

13 thoughts on “Day 6-7: Vermont

  1. Wonderful….. But aren’t there some other institutions situated in the hills….. Oh yes….. Killington….. Great skiing and tennis…..

  2. You went to school, and your wife & kids went to Ben & Jerry’s for free samples? I’m with your wife & kids.

  3. We ae glad to hear that those law students are keeping close tabs on the shitter. It will help when they get out and run into some civil rights cases. We still got some of our outhouses down here segregated. No dogs allowed.

  4. Your talk was fascinating – I thoroughly enjoyed it. And we’re so glad you like Vermont and VLS. Come again!

  5. Thank you, Professor Turley, for a very interesting and thought provoking lecture. You always manage to clearly state the issues (and often with a bit of humor) regardless of how complex the subject is. I agree, Vermont is a special place!

  6. Thanks for your nice words about VLS. As an alum, I can say you captured the spirit of the school perfectly. I am glad that you had a positive experience and am sorry to have missed what sounds like a fascinating talk!

  7. The VLS community thoroughly enjoyed your talk. I was wishing you were in attendance to the event that followed your lecture on world-wide LGBTI issues. I’m sure you could have added a valuable perspective to the conversation. Thank you again for your contribution to our education.

  8. Thank you, Jonathan, for your engaging presentation, your humor, and finally, your shout out to VLS’s General Practice Program.

Comments are closed.