Report: Halliburton Subsidiary Received $39.5 Billion For Iraqi War Alone

KBR_Logo250px-Halliburton_logo.svgMany of us who opposed the continuing Iraqi and Afghanistan wars, it has been difficult to imagine how politicians and others in Washington could continue to sacrifice lives and hundreds of billions in these conflicts. Now there is a report giving an insight into just how profitable these wars are for key companies. For just Iraq alone, some $138 billion went to private companies with an army of lobbyists eager to keep the pipeline of cash flowing. What is rarely striking however is that some ten contractors received 52 percent of the funds and one company received $39.5 billion. That company is Houston-based KBR, Inc., which is an extension of its parent, Halliburton Co. in 2007. That of course is Dick Cheney’s firm.


Many of those contracts going to KBR lacked any competitive bidding process.
This includes the $568-million contract renewal in 2010 to provide housing, meals, water and bathroom services to soldiers — a contract that the Justice Department now says is rife with corruption and kickbacks.

For $40 billion, a single company may be willing to do a lot to keep a war alive. In the very least, it may not be eager to see it end.

Source: ZNet

105 thoughts on “Report: Halliburton Subsidiary Received $39.5 Billion For Iraqi War Alone

  1. Didn’t I read somewhere….. That Cheney was figuring out thr profits before he got W to strike….

  2. War? What War, I thought the last war we fought was WWII? At least that was the last time Congress declared war. So what is all this talk of War? Be definition in our constitution we haven’t had a war for 65+ years.

  3. As I recall from the VP debate in 2000 Cheney stated that his success as head of Halliburton had NOTHING to do with government. Of course, Lieberman just smiled and agreed with him!

  4. Dick Cheney is the Devil

    On a related note, of sorts

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/timothy-karr/one-us-corporations-role-_b_815281.html

    One U.S. Corporation’s Role in Egypt’s Brutal Crackdown

    The open Internet’s role in popular uprising is now undisputed. Look no further than Egypt, where the Mubarak regime today reportedly shut down Internet and cell phone communications — a troubling predictor of the fierce crackdown that has followed.

    What’s even more troubling is news that one American company is aiding Egypt’s harsh response through sales of technology that makes this repression possible.

    Telecom Egypt, the nation’s dominant phone and Internet service provider, is a state-run enterprise, which made it easy on Friday morning for authorities to pull the plug and plunge much of the nation into digital darkness.

    Moreover, Egypt also has the ability to spy on Internet and cell phone users, by opening their communication packets and reading their contents. Iran used similar methods during the 2009 unrest to track, imprison and in some cases, “disappear” truckloads of cyber-dissidents.

    The companies that profit from sales of this technology need to be held to a higher standard. One in particular is an American firm, Narus of Sunnyvale, Calif., which has sold Telecom Egypt “real-time traffic intelligence” equipment.

    Narus, now owned by Boeing, was founded in 1997 by Israeli security experts to create and sell mass surveillance systems for governments and large corporate clients.

    The company is best known for creating NarusInsight, a supercomputer system which is allegedly used by the National Security Agency and other entities to perform mass, real-time surveillance and monitoring of public and corporate Internet communications in real time.

    Narus provides Egypt Telecom with Deep Packet Inspection equipment (DPI), a content-filtering technology that allows network managers to inspect, track and target content from users of the Internet and mobile phones, as it passes through routers on the information superhighway.

  5. AY,
    even if LBJ had some of the same ties, have we not learned anything since the 60’s? I want to know how much of the $39 billion Cheney received.

  6. Brown and Root was LBJs money man. Halliburton was a seperate company for many decades. Read Robert Caro’s bio of LBJ for all the details. Brown and Root hit hard times when they totally screwed up the South Texas Nuclear project. The entire building B&R had built had to be torn down it was so shoddy and a real contractor broght in to build the thing. WE are still paying for that here in Houston, thanks to the Texas GOP and legislature.

  7. KBR (Killing Boys Remotely) is the same scum who “wired” the showers for our service men in Iraq and thus electrocuting them after a day of war misery. Any charges filed? No, let’s reward them with more no-bid contracts, and ensure continued riches in our stock portfolio.

  8. Some of our lawyers here might be able to say what the facts are. I understand that KBR claimed immunity from the lawsuits arising from the fact that their work electrocuted a number of GIs. Does anybody know what happened to those suits? Were they successful?

  9. For me, a serious point in your blog is: “…a contract that the Justice Department now says is rife with corruption and kickbacks.”

    When the so-called Justice department, makes a statement demonstrating a knowledge of criminal activity, should it not be their obligation to pursue those misdeeds and prosecute the wrong-doers? I will not hold my breath waiting for Justice Department action.

    In addition, am I wrong to believe that Mr. Cheney can be considered a war crimes suspect, and is it possible that he could be detained for same if leaves the United States?

    Frank Hammerstrom

  10. Strangely enough, 39.5 billion years is about the same number of collective years Cheney, the Board and the Directors of Halliburton/KBR should be in prison.

  11. Gene,

    I posted the wrong video by mistake. I hope I get it right this time!

    The last section of the following Countdown segment talks about the electrocution of military personnel in showers built by KBR in Iraq;

  12. “After all, the chief business of the American people is business. They are profoundly concerned with producing, buying, selling, investing and prospering in the world. I am strongly of the opinion that the great majority of people will always find these the moving impulses of our life.

    Of course, the accumulation of wealth cannot be justified as the chief end of existence,” he said. “But we are compelled to recognize it as a means to well-nigh every desirable achievement. So long as wealth is made the means and not the end, we need not greatly fear it…But it calls for additional effort to avoid even the appearance of the evil of selfishness. In every worthy profession, of course, there will always be a minority who will appeal to the baser instinct. There always have been, probably always will be, some who will feel that their own temporary interest may be furthered by betraying the interest of others.”

    President Coolidge’s comments are as relevant today as they were in 1925.

  13. randyjet:

    KBR effectively received immunity. A case brought by the family of one of the electrocuted soldiers was dismissed because the court found that it could not consider the liability of the contractor without inquiring into the military decisions that permitted continued use of the facilities when the military knew of the defective conditions. http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/07/20/48585.htm

  14. Gene,

    I think the prison sentences should be stacked for each and every crime convicted…. I wonder how Cheneys next trip to Canada will turn out….. You did hear that Bush and Obama have lifetime presidential protection…..you can think Clinton for reducing it to 10 years….. But Obama…. Such a cherry…. Extended it again….

  15. I know most of you are familiar with this but for those who are not I invite you to watch this excerpt from President Eisenhower’s farewell speech. It certainly is quite evident of sound advice of the past that is not heeded today whereupon disaster ensues.

  16. Remember also that Halliburton moved its HQ to the middle east, as did USCENTCOM.

    The marked up map of Iraqi oil fields, which was used in the Cheney Energy Task Force discussions with Halliburton and other oil barons, prior to 911, has now been made public.

    KBR as an operative of Halliburton and Cheney in Iraq was carrying out what had been planned all along.

  17. Perhaps I missed it in the article or others’ posts, but, as I recall, many of these (Halliburton, Blackwater and others) were No-Bid contracts with immunity granted ahead of time from any prosecution in the US or Iraq. This was the most expensive way possible to run a war which adds credence to the theory that the war itself and its conduct were part of the same goal of emptying of the US Treasury to the benefit of Bush/Cheney cronies to raise the debt and interest payments so high it would “starve the beat” in the conservatives’ attempt to prevent a future Democrat President from getting any domestic programs passed (think economic stimilus, ObamaCare, Jobs Act). Add TARP, the tax cuts of 2001 and 2003 which were not lowered, delayed or rescinded in spite of a worsening economy and the unfunded Medicare Part D and the picture of this cynical plan gets ever sharper.

  18. Mike that decision is outrageous. The doctrine she refers to is for combatant activities and military orders. Being in a rear area and not even remotely connected to combat, I cannot see how the hell that judge could make that ruling. I could understand it if a car bomb blew up and the Sgt was killed because of shoddy construction, THEN the ruling would be reasonable. This is beyond belief..

  19. DS The reason that Ike was so concerned about this topic is that HE was the one who designed it. His job that Gen. Marshall gave him was to plan for the mobilization of US industry and all facilities for the coming war.Ike did a great job, and so he was concerned that the thing he created did not turn on him and our country. Sort of like Oppenheimer creating the A bomb, he then had severe reservations about going further down the nuclear road.

  20. Darren, that video should have served as the Alarm bells sounding. Sadly it did not.

    Carter also tried to warn us about oil and we did not listen.

    We have allowed ourselves to be herded like cattle….or sheep rather

  21. @ ~ 3:13

    Charles Lewis, Center for Public Integrity, about Cheney and Halliburton:

    “His net worth went from a million dollars or less to 60 to 70 million dollars in a span of five years. … So we elected a government contractor as Vice President. This could be Indonesia, sounds like Russia, Nigeria. No, it’s the United States of America. And everything I said is entirely legal. And it is our system of corruption.”

    John McCain:

    “I would have a public investigation of what they’ve done. What’s that? The Vice President’s on the phone? (Reportedly, “the last time that he (McCain) used Halliburton and investigation in the same sentence.)”

  22. This is only a surprise to the wilfully blind, the gullible, and the flag worshippers. Those who spoke out against “no bid contracts” said this would happen, and those who set it up (e.g. Cheney) wanted it to happen. And the only people who have been punished were the whistleblowers who tried to stop it (e.g. Bunnatine Greenhouse, Robert Isakson, et al).

    Redistribution of wealth? That’s exactly what this was – the redistribution of tax dollars from working people to rich corporate shareholders. It’s corporate welfare at its finest.

  23. KBR should be dismantled and it directors and officers should go to jail. Their negligence caused injury and death to our soldiers. If that isn’t giving aid and comfort to the enemy I don’t know what is. Of course, Obama doesn’t want to look back, what an idiot!

  24. Darren,

    Watched the clip of President Eisenhower. Sure sounded to me like he was a left wing radical liberal. If a public figure, say Russ Feingold, gave that speech today, FOX News would be calling it treasonous; or at least un-American. Dick Cheney would be scrambling to find a mic to rant about how Russ was making America less safe and inviting the “terrorists” to attack us.

  25. How do our women & men continue to serve our country, knowing that their fighting to keep the rich richer & the poor poorer? Knowing that if they suffer bodily and/or mental harm that they will be living a low income lifestyle? And people like Dick Cheney & major stock holders of Haliburton will be living a wealthy lifestyle? How do you continue to serve, while walking by that $700 million-30 football size building in Iraq, utilized for manufacturing weapons? The same manufactured weapons being sold to every country in the world, including the middle eastern countries. The same weapons being sold to the ‘Axis of Evil’ countries (per GWB, jr.). How do you continue to serve this country when this same country is making and selling weapons which eventually will end up harming you?

  26. Justice Holmes,
    It was a huge mistake for Obama to not have gone after the torturers and those that approved it. In my opinion, it is a big a mistake as Ford’s pardon of Nixon.

  27. raf,

    I never looked at it in quite that way, ” … (as) big a mistake as Ford’s pardon of Nixon.” but you’re right.

  28. The BIGGEST mistake is continuing to vote for Democrats. If you want to see real change in your lifetime, and not more right-wing rule, then vote
    for someone other than Saint “Goldwater Girl” Hillary in 2016.

    And pay no attention to the people who are so offended by truth that they
    try to prevent it by smearing its messengers/

  29. raff,

    I think it’s a bigger mistake. That’s saying something considering I think the pardon of Nixon was one of the greatest screw ups of all time.

  30. I have endured enough change of the mean spirited and misinformed kind, even if one can believe that some other party tells the truth, I haven’t a clue as to what party? Or are you referring to Colbert’s “truthiness”?

    Back on subject please.

  31. raff

    As I recall, President Obama didn’t want his first term mired in prosecuting the war criminals Bush & Cheney when he felt he needed and, at the time had, the cooperation of Republicans to get the country back on sound economic footing. Given that instead of appreciating his concilatory action and cooperating on the business of governance and acting like adults, the Republicanshave to acted like the petulant children they are, I agree it was a bad decision. Similarly, Harry Reid made a mistake recently by not blowing up the filibuster expecting intelligence and maturity from the same decaying stench that is the GOP. .

  32. RWL,

    “How do our women & men continue to serve our country, knowing that their [sic] fighting to keep the rich richer & the poor poorer?”

    Jingoism runs deep in this country, RWL. This — plus the hollowing out of our economy and educational system since the early eighties — sort of answers your rhetorical question.

    “How do you continue to serve this country when this same country is making and selling weapons which eventually will end up harming you?”

    Yes, let’s forget about “them” and only see the war addiction in this country through the lens of when it might harm “you.” The fact that the US is by far the largest weapons dealer in the world surprises you?

    You live in a warmongering state, RWL. It’s that simple.

  33. Gene H. 1, April 8, 2013 at 4:42 pm

    raff,

    I think it’s a bigger mistake. That’s saying something considering I think the pardon of Nixon was one of the greatest screw ups of all time.

    ———

    Yep.

    And there’s a domestic program that isn’t yet public knowledge. Obama has played right along, from day one, and it continues unabated.

  34. rcampbell,

    “As I recall, President Obama didn’t want his first term mired in prosecuting the war criminals Bush & Cheney when he felt he needed and, at the time had, the cooperation of Republicans to get the country back on sound economic footing.”

    It’s tough being mired — agonizing over whether to abide by legal obligations, or not, must be onerous — and of course the economy is just booming.

    Maybe I missed something, (it’s very possible because I really don’t pay attention to anything, anymore), but I don’t recall much, “cooperation of Republicans,” in Obama’s first term.

  35. anonymous (ap),

    “And there’s a domestic program that isn’t yet public knowledge.”

    Wow, thank you for uncovering said program. It never stops, does it?

  36. what other American companies can do what Halliburton and KBR do? who should have been given an opportunity to bid on these projects?

  37. Bron, There is Bechtel among others. They are the ones who had to pick up the pieces after Brown and Root totally screwed up the South Texas Nuclear project. B&R got that contract because they were the low bidder, even though they had NO experience building nukes and were non-union. So we got to pay over three times the original cost thanks to KBR.

    By the way, I could do a better job than KBR and if I had gotten the contract, I know exactly where to go to get the workers and eqipment.

  38. Bron,

    “what other American companies can do what Halliburton and KBR do? who should have been given an opportunity to bid on these projects?”

    Have you been replaced by a pod person?

    This is the perfect time to get on your hobby horse about how free markets are competitive markets, and then jump on over to your other one about government waste and spending. We’d all be there with you, cheering on your Cossack like horsemanship, applauding as you rode with one foot on each horse.

    Plus, you’d get to wear a cool hat.

  39. OT:

    “‘Who controls the past controls the future’: Assange presents massive Project K leak”

    Published time: April 08, 2013 15:25
    Edited time: April 08, 2013 20:52

    http://rt.com/usa/assange-kissinger-cables-wikileaks-500/ (with a couple of videos)

    Excerpts:

    Project K, says Assange, contains roughly 1.7 million files composed of US Department of State diplomatic communications. And although the material has been classified, declassified and, in some instances, re-classified, the public’s inability to access and peruse the unredacted copies has made them nearly inaccessible.

    “One form of secrecy is the complexity and the accessibility of documents,” WikiLeaks spokesperson Kristinn Hrafnsson said during Monday’s event. “You could say that the government cannot be trusted with these documents.”

    “He who controls the past controls the future, and he who controls the present controls the past,” Assange chimed in using his webcam in London to quote from George Orwell’s novel 1984.

    “The US administration cannot be trusted with its control of its past,” he said. “That is the result of this information being hidden by secrecy, but more often being hidden in the borderline between secrecy and complexity.

  40. Of course, that all would ignore the question of how wise it is to have the armed forces rely on private contractors for a variety of functions in the first place.

    Which is a very big question.

  41. Bron,

    “what other American companies can do what Halliburton and KBR do?”

    Why don’t you tell us, instead of implying none can. Or do you lose your market perspective when it’s tied to patriotic minting of wealth?

    “who should have been given an opportunity to bid on these projects?”

    The whole world, Bron — if your beliefs hold true — the whole world should have had this glorious opportunity to bid on. It’s really exciting to think that we could have had a ten-year war for a third of the cost!

    Are you a statist now? Blood profits only for citizens? Where’s your sense of global competition?

  42. KB and Halliburton now do what the government used to do at a much cheaper cost. Hundreds of billions of tax payer dollars have helped to enrich the already rich. That is what privatization has brought us.

  43. The 1933 Parallels: Between the Reichstag Fire– and how it was used for what followed, and the Twin Towers on 9/11, and what is following.

    At the Nuremberg War Trials, we, the Exceptional Nation, put Alfried Krupp and others on trial. An excerpt from Wiki:

    Krupp Trial

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Jump to: navigation, search

    This article includes a list of references, related reading or external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks inline citations. Please improve this article by introducing more precise citations. (February 2013)

    The judges in the Krupp trial. From back to front: Daly, Anderson (president), and Wilkins

    The Krupp Trial (or officially, The United States of America vs. Alfried Krupp, et al.) was the tenth of twelve trials for war crimes that U.S. authorities held in their occupation zone at Nuremberg, Germany after the end of World War II.

    These twelve trials were all held before U.S. military courts, not before the International Military Tribunal, but took place in the same rooms at the Palace of Justice. The twelve U.S. trials are collectively known as the “Subsequent Nuremberg Trials” or, more formally, as the “Trials of War Criminals before the Nuremberg Military Tribunals” (NMT). The Krupp Trial was the third of three trials of German industrialists; the other two were the Flick Trial and the IG Farben Trial.

    In the Krupp Trial, twelve former directors of the Krupp Group were accused of having enabled the armament of the German military forces and thus having actively participated in the Nazis’ preparations for an aggressive war, and also for having used slave laborers in their companies. The main defendant was Alfried Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach, CEO of the Krupp Holding since 1943 and son of Gustav Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach who had been a defendant in the main Trial of the Major War Criminals before the IMT (where he was considered medically unfit for trial).

    The judges in this case, heard before Military Tribunal III-A, were Hu C. Anderson (presiding judge), president of the court of appeals of Tennessee, Edward J. Daly from Connecticut, and William J. Wilkins from Seattle, Washington. The Chief of Counsel for the Prosecution was Telford Taylor; the Chief Trial Counsel was H. Russell Thayer, and Benjamin B. Ferencz participated as a Special Counsel. The indictment was presented on November 17, 1947; the trial lasted from December 8, 1947 until July 31, 1948. One defendant (Pfirsch) was acquitted, the others received prison sentences between three and twelve years, and the main defendant Alfried Krupp was ordered to sell all his possessions.

    Defendants at the Krupp Trial, from left; Alfried Krupp, Ewald Löser, Eduard Houdremont, Erich Müller, Friedrich Janssen, Karl Pfirsisch and Karl Eberhardt.
    The main defendant Alfried Krupp always denied any guilt. In 1947, he stated:
    “Die Wirtschaft brauchte eine ruhige oder aufwärts steigende Entwicklung. Infolge des Kampfes zwischen den vielen deutschen Parteien und der Unordnung gab es keine Möglichkeit für aufbauende Tätigkeit. … Wir hatten den Eindruck, daß Hitler uns solch eine gesunde Entwicklung bescheren würde. Tatsächlich hat er das getan. … Wir Kruppianer haben uns nie viel um Ideen gekümmert. Wir wollten nur ein System, das gut funktionierte und das uns eine Gelegenheit gab, ungestört zu arbeiten. Politik ist nicht unsere Sache.” —Alfried Krupp, in Golo Mann’s manuscript first published in (Friz 1988). “The economy needed a steady or growing development. Because of the rivalries between the many political parties in Germany and the general disorder there was no opportunity for prosperity. … We thought that Hitler would give us such a healthy environment. Indeed he did do that. … We Krupps never cared much about [political] ideas. We only wanted a system that worked well and allowed us to work unhindered. Politics is not our business.”
    Indeed the Krupp holding did flourish under the Nazi regime. According to conservative estimates, the Krupp enterprises used nearly 100,000 persons in the forced labor programme, about 23,000 of which were prisoners of war.

    [edit] Indictment
    1.Crimes against peace by participating in the planning and waging of wars of aggression and wars in violation of international treaties;
    2.Crimes against humanity by participating in the plundering, devastation, and exploitation of occupied countries;
    3.Crimes against humanity by participating in the murder, extermination, enslavement, deportation, imprisonment, torture, and use for slave labor of civilians who came under German control, German nationals, and prisoners of war;
    4.Participating in a common plan or conspiracy to commit crimes against peace.

    All defendants were charged under counts 1, 3, and 4; count 2 excluded the defendants Lehmann and Kupke. Counts 1 and 4 were soon dropped due to lack of evidence.

    [edit] Defendants

    Name

    Function

    Sentence

    Alfried Krupp

    owner and CEO

    12 years plus forfeiture of property; died 30 July 1967

    Ewald Oskar Ludwig Löser

    former CFO

    7 years; served sentence and released 1955; died 23 December 1970

    Eduard Houdremont (DE)

    director, head of steel works

    10 years; died 10 June 1958

    Erich Müller (DE)

    director, head of arms fabrication

    12 years; died 15 April 1963

    Friedrich Wilhelm Janssen

    CFO, successor to Löser

    10 years; died 1956

    Karl Heinrich Pfirsch

    former head of sales department

    found not guilty: acquitted and released; died 1967

    Max Otto Ihn

    Personnel and intelligence, deputy to Löser and Janssen

    9 years; died 1983

    Karl Adolf Ferdinand Eberhardt

    head of sales, successor of Pfirsch

    9 years;

    Heinrich Leo Korschan

    deputy head of steel plants

    6 years; died 8 January 1973

    Friedrich von Bülow (DE)

    counterintelligence, public relations, and head of the plant police (Werkschutz)

    12 years; died 17 January 1984

    Werner Wilhelm Heinrich Lehmann

    “labor procurement”, deputy to Ihn

    6 years;

    Hans Albert Gustav Kupke

    head of workers’ camps

    2 years and 10 months

    All eleven defendants found guilty were convicted on the forced labor charge (count 3), and of the ten charged on count 2 (economic spoliation), six were convicted. On January 31, 1951, two and a half years after the sentences, ten (all except Löser) were released from prison. Since no buyer for the Krupp Holding had been found, Alfried Krupp resumed control of the firm in 1953.
    [end of wiki]

    Many of you might think that there are no parallels between what the Nazis did and what we are doing. Right. I mean Left. Or, is it in between?

  44. It is a lot larger than KBR and 39 billion dollars, as I pointed out to some extent in my comment up-thread where I pointed out that Halliburton and USCENTCOM moved to Dubai UAE.

    In fact, why that happened is so much of a larger story, if you are like me I don’t think you can accept it at first blush.

    So, I will start with The Chamber of Commerce of Dubai, a copy of the U.S. version formed by a crew you will recognize:

    First notice some of the founding members of that foreign nation’s copy cat chamber:

    Bechtel, The Boeing Company, BP, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, Fluor Corporation, General Dynamics, General Electric, Goldman Sachs, Halliburton, KBR, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon …

    (U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council, Founding Members). Their stated aim and purpose is:

    The U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council provides its diverse membership unparalleled access to senior decision makers in business and government in the U.A.E. and in the U.S.

    (U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council, About, emphasis added). Read a … post that points out we should now know how Dubai came to be characterized by:

    Who rules the nation that has the largest man made harbor on earth and the busiest U.S. Navy port of call?

    Who rules the nation that was given permission to take over a military hardware producing U.S. company?

    Who rules the nation that has the tallest building on earth?

    Who rules the nation that has the largest airport in the world?

    Who rules the nation that received billions of U.S. taxpayer money in the TARP bailout?

    Who rules the nation that has the headquarters for Dick Cheney’s company Halliburton?

    Who rules the nation where AIG did a lot of shady business?

    Who rules the nation that would have ruled over U.S. ports if Bush II had his way?

    Who rules the nation that has luxurious villas purchased by U.S. taxpayer dollars, gushing from the U.S. Treasury into Afghanistan, then to this ruler’s realm?

    (The Islamic Ruler of Dubai). The Chamber has been expanding into the middle east for some time, and continues to do so …

    (The Chamber of Corruption – 3). The Chamber of Commerce in the U.S. is not what it purports to be, and it funnels lots of foreign bucks from there to the U.S. following Citizens United.

    KBR is one of its founders.

  45. Dredd,

    “It is a lot larger than KBR and 39 billion dollars, as I pointed out to some extent in my comment up-thread where I pointed out that Halliburton and USCENTCOM moved to Dubai UAE.”

    You’re a genius, Dredd. Thanks for pointing out that you pointed out something that the world press pointed out in 2006.

  46. I can’t even read these things anymore at least not for a while. It’s too disgusting, despicable and discouraging.

  47. “Justice Holmes,
    It was a huge mistake for Obama to not have gone after the torturers and those that approved it. In my opinion, it is a big a mistake as Ford’s pardon of Nixon.”
    Don’t forget Roosevelt not going after the cabal responsible for the Smedley Butler affair. Recognize a pattern? I see two of them.

  48. Arthur Randolph Erb,

    “By the way, I could do a better job than KBR and if I had gotten the contract, I know exactly where to go to get the workers and eqipment [sic].”

    What a real man you must be, ARE.

  49. gbk It would not take much to outperform KBR, even you could do it if you put your mind to it. Or maybe not given your post.

  50. ARE,

    I probably couldn’t “outperform” KBR due to having a conscience and no great urging to benefact my future through other’s deaths.

    You go for it, ARE. You seem much better suited to the task as you know, “where to go to get the workers and eqipment.”

  51. gbk 1, April 8, 2013 at 9:13 pm

    Dredd,

    “It is a lot larger than KBR and 39 billion dollars, as I pointed out to some extent in my comment up-thread where I pointed out that Halliburton and USCENTCOM moved to Dubai UAE.”

    You’re a genius, Dredd. Thanks for pointing out that you pointed out something that the world press pointed out in 2006.
    ===========================================
    Not so nice of a diversion gbk, more like an infantile troll slip.

    I was describing the content of my comment when I referred to USCENTCOM and Halliburton, so you could find it.

    Great lookup skills there gbk, you found it, but you did not read the next sentence:

    In fact, why that happened is so much of a larger story, if you are like me I don’t think you can accept it at first blush.

    (my comment, emphasis added). The larger story escaped your genius gbk.

    Like Chomsky said in a recent speech, “it takes real genius to not see it.”

    The Chamber of Commerce of the Middle East (a.k.a. U.S. – U.A.E. Business Council) was not formed until 2007, so your allegation that the “world press” revealed it to us a year before it formed is inane.

    Show where the “world press” (what an exacting term you used gbk … like they all say the same thing) pointed out the why of its formation a year before it formed.

    Then explain why these companies formed it:

    Bechtel, The Boeing Company, BP, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, Fluor Corporation, General Dynamics, General Electric, Goldman Sachs, Halliburton, KBR, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon …

    (JT’s post is about KBR) for the following purposes:

    The U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council provides its diverse membership unparalleled access to senior decision makers in … government in … the U.S.

    You might then want to expand upon your genius to point out that Cheney is one “senior decision maker” they are talking about.

    You could remind folks that this was the era when Bush II – Cheney wanted some of those Arabs to manage U.S. ports …

    I did not get this information from the “world press” because they were not cognizant of it, I got it directly from the Arab Business Council Website and published the information.

    They promptly removed it, as they and the government often do once discovered, so I resort to the Wayback Machine (no gbk, that is not the “world press” for genius like yours … or maybe it is).

    If you had read what you criticized you would have noticed that the links are Wayback Machine links … maybe I will tell you about that … oh … never mind you already know why they are trying to hide it from Americans.

    Just a taste of what your trolling genius missed in the mainstream media (Fighting Terrorism For 200 Years – 3).

    It is a catchy story about Saudi Arabia providing money and other assistance to 15 of the 911 hijackers and why the U.S. other nations instead of them.

  52. “It is a catchy story about Saudi Arabia providing money and other assistance to 15 of the 911 hijackers and why the U.S. other nations instead of them.”

    should read: It is a catchy story about Saudi Arabia providing money and other assistance to 15 of the 911 hijackers and why the U.S. invaded and occupied other nations instead of them.

  53. “Many of those contracts going to KBR lacked any competitive bidding process.
    This includes the $568-million contract renewal in 2010 to provide housing, meals, water and bathroom services to soldiers — a contract that the Justice Department now says is rife with corruption and kickbacks.”

    Really. Then who was entirely responsible for running the wars in 2010. Must be those awful people on the other side we all denigrate here. Oh wait. No it was the corrupt OBAMA ADMINISTRATION of course with the Nobel Peace Prize winner as the Commander in Chief.

  54. The All-Time 10 Worst Military Contracting Boondoggles
    —By Adam Weinstein
    | Fri Sep. 2, 2011
    http://www.motherjones.com/mojo/2011/09/contractor-waste-iraq-KBR

    Excerpt:
    3, 2, 1. KBR, KBR, KBR: According to the contracting commission, megacontractor KBR (a.k.a. the contractor formerly known as Halliburton) was paid at least $36.3 billion to provide base support in Iraq for the past eight years. That’s slightly less than the government bailouts for Bank of America and Citigroup. But then, the banks eventually returned the money. The commission report details numerous examples of waste by KBR. Where to begin?

    There’s the kickback from the subcontractors who were awarded a $700 million dining deal in Iraq. (The Department of Justice has filed a claim against KBR for that.) Then there’s the $5 million spent on 144 KBR mechanics who worked as little as 43 minutes a month, on average. Inspectors have found that KBR can’t account for $100 million worth of its government-furnished property in Iraq. Despite collecting $204 million for electrical work on Iraq bases, KBR’s shoddy wiring has been blamed in as many as 12 soldiers’ electrocution deaths, including a Special Forces commando who died after he was shocked in a shower stall. The company has also billed Uncle Sam a half-billion dollars to hire Blackwater to provide personal security in Iraq, a big contractor no-no.

    Perhaps most troubling is the company’s links to purported human trafficking. In late 2008, reporters discovered a windowless warehouse on the Camp Victory complex outside Baghdad, where about 1,000 men from Bangladesh, India, Nepal, and Sri Lanka were being held in prisonlike conditions. The men had been hired by a KBR subcontractor. Around the same time, another KBR subcontractor was sued for allegedly spiriting Asian workers into Iraq with false promises of high-paying jobs.

    And the waste continues. When the troop drawdown in Iraq started, writes the commission, “KBR accounted for about half of contractor personnel in Iraq. When bases closed and its personnel left those bases, KBR merely transferred some of them to other bases and continued to bill for their support.” In all, KBR has cost the government at least $193 million in pay for unnecessary personnel, and maybe as much as $300 million. However, the Pentagon is in no hurry to give KBR the boot. “We basically said that KBR is too big to fail,” commission co-chair and former Rep. Christopher Shays (R-Conn.) complained last year, “so we are still going to fund them.”

  55. Worldview: The real winners in the war
    By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
    Posted: April 01, 2013
    http://articles.philly.com/2013-04-01/news/38165576_1_wartime-contracting-kbr-iraq-work

    Excerpt:
    Perhaps the biggest beneficiary of the contract largesse, as you may recall, was Kellogg Brown & Root, or KBR, then a subsidiary of Halliburton Co. – whose CEO from 1995 to 2000 was Dick Cheney. KBR received huge, no-bid government contracts and reaped tens of billions of dollars for its Iraq work. A highly placed Pentagon procurement officer who tried to blow the whistle on some KBR contracts was drummed out of her job in 2005. In 2009, Halliburton agreed to pay $559 million to the U.S. government to settle corruption charges linked to KBR.

  56. Check out the leadership of the “Arab” chamber of commerce called “U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council”, founded by U.S. Military Industrial Oil Complex operatives listed in my comment above:

    Danny E. Sebright President, U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council

    Danny E. Sebright was appointed in June 2008 to the position of President of the U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council, the leading advocate for building commercial relationships and expanding business opportunities between the two countries.

    Since 2002, Mr. Sebright held the position of Vice President at The Cohen Group, an international strategic consulting firm led by former Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen. Mr. Sebright was responsible for new business development activities, client management, and building the firm’s Middle East and India practice groups. Mr. Sebright will continue to be affiliated with The Cohen Group as a Counselor.

    Previously, Mr. Sebright served as the Defense Department’s Director of the Policy Executive Secretariat for the global war on terrorism from 2001-2002, leading a team responsible for tracking US and coalition actions related to the war on terrorism. During this time, he also participated in oversight of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM in Afghanistan and Operation NOBLE EAGLE, the defense of the U.S. homeland. In this capacity, he was awarded the Department of Defense Exceptional Civilian Service Award for his service to his country.

    Mr. Sebright also served in the Office of the Under Secretary for Policy at DoD from 1995-2001, representing Department of Defense positions with other executive-branch policy offices…

    Colin Rutherford Vice President, U.S.-U.A.E. Business Council

    Colin Rutherford assumed the role of Vice President in May of 2012. In this capacity he is responsible for managing the day to day operations at the Council and oversees member services, recruitment, and retention.

    Previously, Colin served as a Senior Commercial Specialist at the U.A.E. Trade and Commercial Office, Embassy of the United Arab Emirates. Colin handled the Defense, Offsets, Rail & Transportation, and International Trade Compliance portfolios. On the policy side, Colin contributed to the TIFA-Plus annual agenda as well as the Economic Policy Dialogue (EPD) between the U.A.E. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the U.S. Department of State.

    (Team Members). None of those listed on the “U.A.E. Team” are U.A.E. citizens, they are Americans.

  57. gbk:

    that was an interesting article. I was going to post to you that I would not have thought it prudent to depend on another country for logistical support during war time.

    the whole war has been a bad business from the beginning and I believe Osama got what he wanted; America in chaos.

  58. Dredd,

    “Not so nice of a diversion gbk, more like an infantile troll slip.

    I was describing the content of my comment when I referred to USCENTCOM and Halliburton, so you could find it.

    Great lookup skills there gbk, you found it, but you did not read the next sentence . . .”

    I didn’t look shit up, nor was I offering a diversion, Dredd.

    I just don’t like you and your constant reference to your feeble blog. Got that? Is that clear enough for you?

    You spout common known fact as if you were the holder of many secrets, but in reality you just regurgitate while claiming none can follow your astute observations.

  59. Bron,

    “I was going to post to you that I would not have thought it prudent to depend on another country for logistical support during war time.”

    Then why didn’t you?

    These are not wars that the country is engaged in — they are profit machines, finely tuned to the “exceptionalism” of american culture and so their acceptance for more than a decade. After all, we are saving the world, again, aren’t we?

  60. gbk:

    you beat me to it with the New Yorker article.

    That is how it has worked out, I dont think it started that way.

  61. Bron,

    Then you are blind because that’s exactly how “it” started — the quest for more — and it is obtuseness that keeps this obscene ball in play.

  62. “I’ll keep on moving
    Things are bound to be improving these days
    These days–” -Jackson Browne

    Thanks, gbk.

    “the quest for more — and it is obtuseness that keeps this obscene ball in play” -gbk

    Yep. “The quest for more” $$$, power, authority, control… And it’s obscene, to be sure.

  63. Bron,

    Don’t play your asinine word games, Bron.

    It’s history now, you can read about it, they teach 9/11 and our response in college level critical thinking classes now. Put your one-color prism down for a second and you might see other hues.

  64. gbk 1, April 9, 2013 at 10:27 am

    Dredd,

    “Not so nice of a diversion gbk, more like an infantile troll slip.

    I was describing the content of my comment when I referred to USCENTCOM and Halliburton, so you could find it.

    Great lookup skills there gbk, you found it, but you did not read the next sentence . . .”

    I didn’t look shit up, nor was I offering a diversion, Dredd.

    I just don’t like you and your constant reference to your feeble blog. Got that? Is that clear enough for you?

    You spout common known fact as if you were the holder of many secrets, but in reality you just regurgitate while claiming none can follow your astute observations.
    ============================================
    You just admitted what I said.

    You are an ad hominem troll whose mind is malfunctioning and should not spend much time on a blog of this character.

    Get on over to Sarah Palin’s or Michelle Bacman’s place and sing troll songs to the ignorant.

  65. Naomi Klein’s “Shock Doctrine” is a great read and discusses some of these backroom deals that contractors were involved in; not only in Iraq but many others as well.

  66. Dredd:

    gbk knows a good deal about rocks though, a testament to the fact that we all have some redeeming quality.

  67. One story about another war contractor:

    Blackwater Founder Implicated in Murder
    By Jeremy Scahill
    August 4, 2009
    http://www.thenation.com/article/blackwater-founder-implicated-murder#

    Excerpt:
    A former Blackwater employee and an ex-US Marine who has worked as a security operative for the company have made a series of explosive allegations in sworn statements filed on August 3 in federal court in Virginia. The two men claim that the company’s owner, Erik Prince, may have murdered or facilitated the murder of individuals who were cooperating with federal authorities investigating the company. The former employee also alleges that Prince “views himself as a Christian crusader tasked with eliminating Muslims and the Islamic faith from the globe,” and that Prince’s companies “encouraged and rewarded the destruction of Iraqi life.”

    In their testimony, both men also allege that Blackwater was smuggling weapons into Iraq. One of the men alleges that Prince turned a profit by transporting “illegal” or “unlawful” weapons into the country on Prince’s private planes. They also charge that Prince and other Blackwater executives destroyed incriminating videos, emails and other documents and have intentionally deceived the US State Department and other federal agencies. The identities of the two individuals were sealed out of concerns for their safety.

    These allegations, and a series of other charges, are contained in sworn affidavits, given under penalty of perjury, filed late at night on August 3 in the Eastern District of Virginia as part of a seventy-page motion by lawyers for Iraqi civilians suing Blackwater for alleged war crimes and other misconduct. Susan Burke, a private attorney working in conjunction with the Center for Constitutional Rights, is suing Blackwater in five separate civil cases filed in the Washington, DC, area. They were recently consolidated before Judge T.S. Ellis III of the Eastern District of Virginia for pretrial motions. Burke filed the August 3 motion in response to Blackwater’s motion to dismiss the case. Blackwater asserts that Prince and the company are innocent of any wrongdoing and that they were professionally performing their duties on behalf of their employer, the US State Department.

  68. Elaine:

    wow, wasnt this an episode of 24? Life immitates art or the writers of 24 knew something.

    Blackwater should have never existed.

  69. Bron,

    You should read Jeremy Scahill’s book “Blackwater: The Rise of the World’s Most Powerful Mercenary Army”–if you haven’t already.

  70. Elaine:

    no, I havent. I imagine it is a good read. Mercenary armies on our soil, even if citizens, is not a good idea. Most people are only loyal to their stomachs, very few are loyal to ideas no matter how good they [ideas] may be.

  71. Elaine:

    “That there are men in all countries who get their living by war, and by keeping up the quarrels of Nations is as shocking as it is true…”
    ― Thomas Paine

  72. Bron,

    WHY WE FIGHT (Documentary)
    http://www.cbc.ca/documentaries/whywefight.html

    Excerpt:
    Just why does America fight? Acclaimed filmmaker Eugene Jarecki, (The Trials of Henry Kissinger) creates a sense of urgency and moves beyond the headlines to uncover the deeper answers behind the American war machine in WHY WE FIGHT – Winner of the Documentary Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival in 2005.

    Inspired by Dwight Eisenhower’s legendary farewell speech, filmmaker Jarecki surveys the scorched landscape of a half-century’s military adventures, asking how, and revealing why he believes that the nation of, by, and for the people has become the savings-and-loan of a system whose survival depends on a state of constant war. Jarecki explores the gap between perception and reality, and is concerned not only with the viewpoint of Americans, but also with the perspective of those on the receiving end, the Iraqis.

    On the film, Jarecki says, “Frank Capra made a series of films during World War II called ‘Why We Fight’ that explored America’s reasons for entering the war. Today, with our troops engaged in Iraq and elsewhere for reasons far less clear, I think it’s crucial to ask the questions: ‘Why are we doing what we are doing? What is it doing to others? And what is it doing to us?’”

  73. Elaine:

    endless war is the way all statist societies survive. Look at North Korea, they are in a perpetual state [readiness] for war.

    America has become a statist society. We are no longer the liberal society of our founding fathers. And now we see MSNBC talk show hosts saying children should belong to the state. Well shiver me timbers wasnt that part of Plato’s Republic a model for an authoritarian/statist government if ever there was one.

    Big corporations and the politicians who support and are supported by them have destroyed our country.

  74. Bron,

    I believe some people misconstrued what Melissa Harris Perry was saying.

    *****

    Sarah Palin: Melissa Harris-Perry’s ‘Lean Forward’ Ad Is ‘Unflippingbelievable’ (VIDEO)
    The Huffington Post
    By Rebecca Shapiro
    Posted: 04/08/2013
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/08/sarah-palin-melissa-harris-perry-lean-forward-ad_n_3038253.html?ir=Media

    Excerpt:
    It seems as though Melissa Harris-Perry has irked Sarah Palin and multiple members of the conservative media (see update below).

    In her new “Lean Forward” ad, the MSNBC host argues that the U.S. should invest more in public education. “We have never invested as much in public education as we should have because we’ve always had kind of a private notion of children … We haven’t had a very collective notion of ‘these are our children,'” she says in the ad. “So part of it is we have to break through our kind of private idea that ‘kids belong to their parents,’ or ‘kids belong to their families,’ and recognize that kids belong to whole communities.”

    Last week, conservative media watchdog Newsbusters criticized Harris-Perry’s ad for its notion of collective responsibility. Newsbusters’ Ken Shepherd wrote that “the notion of collective responsibility for children was a philosophy that undergirded the Cultural Revolution in Communist China under Chairman Mao.”

  75. Elaine:

    I dont know how that can be spun. She said children are a collective responsibility. Give them up at birth and the state will raise them.

    Sometimes people like her get too comfortable and let their guard down.

  76. Cheney, Blackwater, outsourcing… So many roads lead back to Cheney.

    http://www.democracynow.org/2013/4/10/the_way_of_the_knife_nyts

    The Way of the Knife: NYT’s Mark Mazzetti on the CIA’s Post-9/11 Move from Spying to Assassinations

    MARK MAZZETTI: And the targeted killings. And the proposal was certainly to, you know, go into countries that—where the United States was allied with, certainly. And what happened after that meeting was basically—it was early, and they hadn’t really fleshed out many details, but Vice President Cheney and his staff said, “OK, proceed with this program.” What happens then is they do some training, and they get into the war in Afghanistan, and that sort of diverts the CIA’s attention. They don’t, to my knowledge, actually carry out anything under this program. And then, in 2004, it becomes outsourced to Blackwater, the private security company, or at least a few senior officers of Blackwater, and including one of them who was in that meeting in late 2001 who had originally pitched it to the vice president. And so, it’s an interesting story about how the CIA was wrestling in these months after 9/11 to—they had these authorities they hadn’t had in decades, and they were trying to figure out—

    NERMEEN SHAIKH: But was it—was that unprecedented, the use of private contractors like Blackwater? Had the CIA or the—had they done that before?

    MARK MAZZETTI: It’s—there’s probably aspects in the CIA’s history where they’ve—I mean, we know certainly that they’ve hired private citizens, that they’ve hired various factions to carry out these types of missions in its history. It was certainly unprecedented, or it hadn’t been decades since they got back into this. And Blackwater does become a close partner with the CIA for a number of years. And this was sort of one aspect of it. So it was a—it was a sort of incredible moment for them to then take this program and say, “OK, well, we’re going to, for deniability reasons, for some—to some degree, send it to a private company.”

    AMY GOODMAN: We’re going to break; when we come back, look at how President Obama not only continued the shadow wars of the Bush administration, but expanded them. And we’re going to hear some stories, like the beginning of the book, the story of Ray Davis. Mark Mazzetti is a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter with The New York Times. His new book, The Way of the Knife. Stay with us

  77. Bron 1, April 10, 2013 at 11:26 am

    Elaine:

    I dont know how that can be spun. She said children are a collective responsibility. Give them up at birth and the state will raise them.

    Sometimes people like her get too comfortable and let their guard down.
    ==============================================
    The right misinterpreted her meaning, and she did not articulate it as well as she should have.

    It is no more than the old saying “It takes a village to raise a child.”

    Which is another way of saying our culture is our primary teacher whether we are aware of it or not.

    Our culture, being made up of various subcultures by design and by our constitution, is not homogeneous in the sense that all states and churches are the same in laws and doctrine.

    It is homogeneous in the sense of the bill of rights and other constitutional concepts that PROTECT AND CELEBRATE the differences.

    The tides have somehow turned so that our children now are learning to hate differences rather than rejoice in them.

    Tolerance, a great virtue, is dying out in our culture.

    Our children, without it, are in danger.

  78. Bron 1, April 10, 2013 at 11:26 am

    Elaine:

    I dont know how that can be spun. She said children are a collective responsibility. Give them up at birth and the state will raise them.

    *****

    That’s your interpretation–that she suggested parents give up their children at birth and let the state raise them?

  79. Elaine, “I believe some people misconstrued what Melissa Harris Perry was saying.”
    **** Only because they wanted to for political reasons.

    Bron, “Sometimes people like her get too comfortable and let their guard down.”
    **** LOL, Yea, they sure do and here’s the perfect example, just perfect. I suspect that since he and his can’t blame the victims dismissing them is the fallback position. Then again, all the talk about ‘if only the victims (or their caregivers) were also armed it wouldn’t have happened or the damage could have been mitigated’ is in fact victim blaming.

    “James Inhofe: Gun Debate Has Nothing To Do With Families Of Newtown Victims”

    “WASHINGTON — Sen. James Inhofe (R-Okla.) said Tuesday that the gun control debate doesn’t have anything to do with the families of the Newtown, Conn., shooting victims, and that the only reason those families think it does is because President Barack Obama told them it did.

    Eleven family members of Newtown victims were in Washington on Tuesday, meeting privately with senators to urge them to support a forthcoming gun package that would impose tighter background checks, crack down on gun trafficking and enhance school safety measures. Speaking to a handful of reporters, Inhofe said he feels bad for those families because they’re being used as pawns in a political fight.

    “See, I think it’s so unfair of the administration to hurt these families, to make them think this has something to do with them when, in fact, it doesn’t,” Inhofe said. ….”

  80. Dredd,

    “You are an ad hominem troll whose mind is malfunctioning and should not spend much time on a blog of this character.

    Get on over to Sarah Palin’s or Michelle Bacman’s place and sing troll songs to the ignorant.

    And gbk (gibberish ben kookie), when you get over to MOMCOM’s place, tell her I am talking about her private parts in public (MOMCOM: The Private Parts – 5). Thanks.”
    —————————————————

    You’re a hoot, Dredd.

    You have the fortitude of conviction that all plagiarizers posses — crying foul when your tomes are exposed as unoriginal.

    And then there is that accusation of me being an, “ad hominem troll,” though you are the one utilizing this tactic, as this thread shows.

    Sorry I don’t view your self-promotion as significant — I suggest you just get over it and possibly realize my position is not unfounded given your many links to your blog over the years.

  81. Bron,

    “Dredd:
    gbk knows a good deal about rocks though, a testament to the fact that we all have some redeeming quality.”

    So what is your redeeming quality, Bron?

    1) One-trick pony observations where the political and economic definitions of socialism/communism/fascism are all the same.

    2) Anecdotal experiences that confirm (1).

    3) Scribing your own definition of words so that (1) is confirmed.

    Let me know.

  82. george orwell was a great prophet and once told of the pigs changing the laws to suit their own greed.
    make love not oil, you may reap what you sow.

Comments are closed.