Study: Half of Adult Population in U.S. To Be Obese By 2030

A study by the Mailman School of Public Health in Columbia University in New York estimates that half of both men and women in the U.S. will be obese by 2030 if current trends continue. Currently, 32 percent of men and 35 per cent of women are obese. Our cousins in England will not be far behind — with rates of obesity of 41-48 percent for men and 35-43 percent for women by 2030.

The increase in obesity will add millions of new cases of diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

It is a shocking and sobering thought for our society.

The study was published in Lancet.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2030563/HALF-U-S-population-obese-2030-experts-predict.html#ixzz1WGGmdwXz

46 thoughts on “Study: Half of Adult Population in U.S. To Be Obese By 2030”

  1. OS, He was a skilled chef if he was already experimenting with salts at such a young age.

  2. My late grandson was a skilled young chef. He started cooking when he had to stand on a stool to reach the stove. He was partial to Kosher salt, but also liked to use sea salt, depending on the dish. He never used anything but sea salt on fish, which seems logical to me.

  3. Or you can use the very expensive Fleur De Sel – hand harvested french sea salt.

  4. pete, Most grocers carry chipotle peppers in adobo sauce. I have used those.

  5. pete Sea salts are better for you and they have a fresher taste than the mixes. Many of the mixes include sugar and onion powder.

  6. i like adobo, it’s mostly salt but on potatoes i use less of it than i would plain salt.

  7. Porcini mushroom sea salt is another good one. That and the alderwood smoked sea salt are my favorites.

  8. OS,

    The way I look at it, by the time the food hits the table salt should be a condiment, not an ingredient.

    If you like seasoned salts, you should check out “The Improvisational Cook” it’s got a big section on them. Actually, if you like cooking, you should check it out. It’s probably the second most used cook book in my collection.

  9. Gyges, I do salt meat before cooking as a couple of others mention. Very sparingly, only to watch some of my family members oversalt their food when served. Both my wife and daughter seem to like a little food with their salt. My other daughter is more like me–she uses salt sparingly. When cooking, I often use a seasoned salt.

    As for the heat index of hot sauces, Tabasco has a complex flavor that adds to the dish. Sauces that just go for a high heat index often have little or no flavor–just a lot of heat. It takes about a year to make a bottle of Tabasco. It is fermented in a process almost as complicated as making good Scotch.

  10. I’m willing to wager it will be significantly more than 50% obesity in the US by 2030 given the cost of buying real(fresh)food and the effort involved in preparing it. Americans want everything fast and cheap, even if it’s bad for their health in the long run. Unless, of course, they re-define “obese” again….

  11. Gyges,

    I just smoked a brisket and a rack of ribs and did the rub the day before, I was told that that was the best that they had had….I agree…One thing I like to also do is cook “baked” beans on the smoker as well…Some of the aroma flows in to the pot….

  12. OS,

    I sure hope you mean “and on meat,” because if not, your steaks and roasts are suffering.

    http://www.bonappetit.com/tipstools/tips/2008/10/salting_meat

    http://www.cooksillustrated.com/video/default.asp?newVideo=y&docid=10808

    Not only does it help the Mallard reaction, but thanks to osmosis, if you salt it long enough ahead of time, some of the flavor compounds from the rub will penetrate deeper into the meat.

    I salt and rub my roasts a full day ahead of cooking them, and steaks about an hour and it makes a big difference.

  13. I do not use salt at all except on the rare occasion I eat an egg. My condiment of choice is Tabasco sauce. “Cajun ketchup.”

    I get it in the large 12 ounce size bottle and go through it pretty fast. It really adds to the flavor of food and with enough Tabasco, you cannot tell if the food has been salted or not. 😉

  14. “My downfall is potatoes”

    Blouise,

    I too am a potato lover. They are really not fattening, it’s the methods of preparation that do it. Instead of french fries I broil them in the oven with
    garlic powder, onion powder and chili powder, using a non-fat cooking spray. The medium potato is about 80 calories. You can bake it and spread with “I can’t Believe It’s Not Butter Light” which has 5 grams per tablespoon. There is also no-fat sour cream that tastes quite good. If mashed, use of roasted garlic cloves, non-fat milk and other seasonings produces a tasty dish.

    Gene,

    As I said I’ll have to try In and Out when I’m on the road. To me the best burger there is, is at a small restaurant chain in NYC (3 locations) called
    “Jackson Hole”. They prepare huge burgers that are “steam grilled”. Unbelievable taste, but definitely a caloric/fat nightmare.

    “The big problem is that salt enhances flavor so it’s become the go-to way to get away with using substandard ingredients.”

    Gyges,

    This is so true. For a good part of my life too, I was a salt freak, who would even salt before tasting. Now I don’t really like salt that much since I’ve found that good spices can give great flavor, without adding extra calories and blood pressure. Only when I infrequently eat out will I have soup prepared by someone else. I’m a soup lover so when I want some I prepare it at home without salt, but with enough good spices to give good flavor.

  15. As I was stepping out of the shower, my wife said, “You know, you ought to diet.”

    I replied, “Why? What color is it now?”

  16. Woosty,

    Re:

    “So in my book, it may be more factual to ‘blame’ 9/11 or the toxic elections and the recent unravelling of the anti-trust laws and workers rights and conditions for the ‘epidemic’ of obesity. I think people are just incredibly stressed in general…wait till all those clogged hearts and arteries hit our newly trimmed and ‘optimately economical’ healthcare system….”

    Yes. …and, ironically, a lack of health insurance is pretty darn stressful for many, as well.

  17. woosty

    not only are they good eating we can render the fat and use it to power diesel engines.

    so go ahead chunky’s, supersize it.
    vroom, vroom.

  18. How strange.

    Libya provided free education, free medical care, interest free loans for home buyers, $50K cash to newly weds for home purchase, fourteen cent per gallon gasoline (.14), and … well you get the point.

    But they did not have many obese folks.

    Take that Libya!

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