Connecticut State Trooper Charged With Robbing Dead Accident Victim Of Cash and Jewelry

CT_-_State_Police_BadgeConnecticut State Trooper Aaron Huntsman, 43, has been charged with larceny for allegedly stealing jewelry and cash from the victim of a fatal motorcycle crash on Sept. 22. There is perhaps no greater violation of public trust for an offer than the robbery of a deceased victim. If convicted, for that reason, Huntsman would likely face heavy aggravators on sentencing, pushing the sentence higher.

The 18-year veteran of the department is accused of robbing John Scalesse, 49, after he died from injuries sustained in the crash. The Scalesse’s family determined that jewelry, clothing and cash were missing — including $3,000 in cash and a gold chain from the victim’s body.

Upon investigation, it was determined that no jewelry was logged into evidence. Later, a large amount of cash was found in the trooper’s police cruiser.

That led to two counts of third-degree larceny, interfering with police and tampering with or fabricating physical evidence.

Huntsman’s state police salary is actually quite high: $80,000. He made almost $112,000 in 2011.

Source:NBC

29 thoughts on “Connecticut State Trooper Charged With Robbing Dead Accident Victim Of Cash and Jewelry”

  1. if he had tased the biker until he died the trooper would be getting a week off with pay but he stole from him so he gets in trouble.

    otay

  2. I don’t read the US Constitution like one commenter purports to do nightly. However, a two tiered legal system, w/ stiffer penalties for those “who betray the public trust” doesn’t seem to pass constitutional muster. To propose draconian penaties like this seems illogical and quite emotional.

  3. It seems to me that the state of Connecticut needs to consider a review and possible overhaul of its law enforcement system.

  4. “Find out the Law Enforcement Offender’s burial place for closest relatives and go rob the graves at night. Video the casket being rummaged and post this on utube.”
    ~+~
    That’s deplorable and arbitrary. I might suggest reading the US Constitution where it it indicates that nobody will be held to answer for a crime for corruption of blood.

    What kind of nation do you think we would be if family members, who are not involved, much less living, are to be held to be shamed and humiliated based up the actions of another adult? I would ask if you had any relatives who committed a crime should you have to pay, or more importantly would you set the example by submitting yourself for sanctions because a relative of yours did something illegal.

  5. Justice Holmes
    1, November 30, 2012 at 9:26 am
    If he is guilty I hope they throw the book at him and if he has any pension rights take those too.

    ————————————————————–

    Agree

  6. Well, the gold chain stolen is probably worth more than 3 grand, depending on the karat and the weight. It does not take much gram weight in 18K, at $1,700,00 an oz., to add up to thousands of dollars.

  7. I have a solution. Could be a national winner.

    Require all officers upon exiting car to put on a pointy highhat with fisheye videocam pointed downwards. All actions and sounds to be recorded.
    This will ba an addition to dashboard cam.

    Police would have to put them on on all occasions, even for coffee breaks. They will now be called LE dunces to remind them of the (dis)respect that they have earned.

    And weekly fMRIs to see what the weekly take has been.

  8. If the dead guy has a good brother or son there can be some retribution. Here is my advice. Find out the Law Enforcement Offender’s burial place for closest relatives and go rob the graves at night. Video the casket being rummaged and post this on utube.

  9. This is disgusting. Are they sure the motorcyclist was dead when the officer arrived? Maybe the officer let him bleed out while picking his pockets. One bad deed leads one to think the worst.

  10. What Justice Holmes said.

    I’m a huge proponent of the idea that those who hold an office of public trust – like a LEO – should face stiffer penalties if found guilty of a crime in violation of that trust. And I mean really stiff. Like double what a normal citizen would catch. That would create an enormous deterrent to malfeasance.

  11. If he is guilty I hope they throw the book at him and if he has any pension rights take those too.

  12. A despicable act to be sure, but robbery requires the taking be accomplished by application of force or threat of force.

  13. When Gov. Abe Ribicoff did away w/ county government in the 50’s/60’s, the Ct. State Police grew exponentially. Ribicoff gave the jurisdiction formerly held by county sheriffs to the State Police. Having grown up in Ct., and still having a lot of family there, I follow the state. The State Police has evolved into a mostly unnaccountable police force. Ribicoff was of course a Dem. He was a US Seanator when he bravely stood up @ the 1968 Convention and called mayor Daley a thug. And, he was a practical politician who correctly saw County govt. as an unneeded layer of bureaucracy in such a small state. That certainly wouldn’t happen w/ any Dem today! However, for every action there is an equal and positive reaction. The Ct. State Police has evloved into a semi rogue police force. Cities have their own forces, but State Police have jurisdiction over the rural areas which is the majority of that pastoral state. Many operate out of their residences and have virtually no supervision. That’s never good in any organization, particularly police.

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