Controversial French Runner Stripped Of Gold After Stripping During Race

220px-Mahiedine_Mekissi_Meeting_Areva_2009Mahiedine Mekhissi-Benabbad is truly a nightmare to any competitor due to his speed and an equal menace to himself due to his lack of control. Mekhissi-Benabbad has faced continuing controversies over thuggish or plain stupid acts in competition. The most recent, as shown in the video below, was to strip off his shirt while handily winning the European 3000m steeplechase. It would have been his third consecutive gold medal but the judges stripped him of his win for acting, again, like an adolescent. I remain a bit old-fashioned on athletes acting out in such cases. Indeed, I am one of the few people who seem to continue to support the ban on excessive celebration in the NFL and the rule against trash talking.

You may be recall Mekhissi-Benabbad from when he pushed over a little girl in a large costume during an earlier race (and, in another competition, shoving another costumed character) and, even after finding out that it was a little girl, not apologizing for acting like a thug.

Then there was his getting into a fist fight with fellow French runner Mehdi Baala after a 1500m race in Monaco.

In the latest juvenile display, Mekhissi-Benabbad stripped off his shirt to begin celebrating before he won the race.

Mekhissi-Benabbad is clearly an amazing athlete. It is simply a shame that he cannot be half as good in controlling himself as he is in dominating competitions.

Source: Yahoo

25 thoughts on “Controversial French Runner Stripped Of Gold After Stripping During Race”

  1. Oh my God! He took off his shirt. Unbelievable that self righteous prudes are getting soooooo upset.

  2. Paul;

    As is customary – you cross the line of good form (with the Dredd ?).

    Don’t we (loyalists to this realm) – have a right to request of the Lord?

  3. This is nothing to lose a medal over. This is the nanny state in motion. I am reminded of the two runners at the Mexico Olympics who gave the Black Power salute except this is an absolute nothing.

  4. One “thug” vs the many right here in the U.S.:

    http://www.commondreams.org/further/2014/08/14/different-day-ferguson

    As one commenter wrote:

    “The cops really went too far and they did so pre-emptively. Americans were appalled and the governor was compelled to reign in the thugs.”

    You write about the thuggish behavior of one, while ignoring the violent thuggish behavior of the police in Ferguson, Missouri, which is just a symptom of the larger problems in the U.S.

  5. Nick,

    Thuggish behavior in sports is becoming too routine. There used to be a code of honor. That is gone, mirroring our culture……..True

    As a reference, I’m tracking the Tony Stewart Sprint car race killing in NY.
    Tony better lawyer up. If the Sheriff and DA want fame, they will prosecute. And a possible civil lawsuit to boot.

    NASCAR little rich kid gone wild. Tony fight video starts at 1:43 in the clip.

  6. Concur – a major over reaction by the judges (and this blog as well).

    Good thing for you “Professor” – that there’s no judges on your typos!

    N’est-ce pas!

  7. Meh. I could care less about the shirt. If it’s in the rules, he should have had the maturity to leave his shirt on. The announcer in the first video suggested he may have set up the pushing of the mascots to gain publicity. Whether he’s being a thug or a publicity hound by setting up a belligerent act, he’s a full on “wanker.” The fist fight is evidence of a first-rate jerk. Most athletes act with class and decorum. Most people act with some level of decency. Social media passes this stuff around and focuses on the sensational to the point we all begin to assume the entire world is like this. What’s most sad, is when people start believing everyone else is a jerk, and they start to behave in kind. Courtesy, practiced every day in all instances, would go a long way to ease tension everywhere. Have a lovely and loving day, everyone.

  8. Yes, this incident in isolation is no big deal, but when viewed in the larger context of human actions, it shows the degeneration of respect for humanity that is happening everywhere. Just like in Ferguson. I actually feel it is life imitating art–or media in this case. It seems as thought people seek to interact in a belligerent manner just like the TV pundits do.

    Not to mention people with very low ideals given the latest technology in harming other humans and turning them loose to maintain order. Just an armed version of TV punditry. “We gots the big stick–and we’re not afraid to use it on anyone!”

  9. Thuggish behavior in sports is becoming too routine. There used to be a code of honor. That is gone, mirroring our culture.

  10. “Why the JT Media blackout of the Ferguson MO incidents?” -Dredd

    Indeed.

  11. Let’s see, taking off one’s shirt before winning the European 3000m steeplechase (and engaging in “thuggish” acts) — or something life-threatening…

    We can be part of the problem. Or part of the solution.

    “Attention World: You just don’t get it.”

    by Laurie Garrett

    http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2014/08/14/you_are_not_nearly_scared_enough_ebola_vaccine_west_africa_outbreak

    ” Despite current response mechanisms, this Ebola outbreak, Isaacs said as he closed his remarks, “is uncontained and out of control in West Africa.”

    Even if the world dodges a viral bullet and Ebola fails to take hold in a metropolis in a different country (such as Lagos, Johannesburg, Delhi, or Sao Paulo), controlling the disease and saving lives in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea will require resources on a scale nobody has delineated. The emotionally distraught doctors and nurses on the front lines are screaming for help. ”

    “Laurie Garrett is senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations and a Pulitzer Prize winning science writer.”

    http://www.msf.org/article/ebola-official-msf-response-who-declaring-ebola-international-public-health-emergency

  12. He’s young, he’s at the top of his game. I really don’t see the problem, certainly nothing deserving of taking away his medal. And if I was the “backup” to receive the medal, I’d refuse it. Who’d want an award they hadn’t earned?

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