British Minister Scuttles Boaty McBoatface

15583117-1458567987-640x360It appears that Americans are not the only voters aggrieved what is viewed as a rigged political system. We recently discussed the groundswell of support for the naming of Britain’s new $300 million research ship. The English voted overwhelmingly for “Boaty McBoatface,” which I also viewed as brilliant. The tee-shirt sales alone could fund another sister ship. However, those stodgy, killjoys in the English government have scuttled “Boaty McBoatface” — showing both a lack of democratic values as well as any cognizable sense of humor.

s216_jo-johnsonScience Minister and adult supervisor Jo Johnson said “Many [names] were imaginative, some were more suitable than others.” More suitable that Boaty McBoatface, I thought the alliteration alone would appeal from someone named Jo Johnson.

Yet, Johnson insisted that “I think we were clear when launching the competition that we were looking for a name that would be in keeping with the mission.” Ok, Jo. It is a boat and its mission is boating and its name is Boaty McBoatface.

It appears that the establishment that viewed Benny Hill as the epitome of the comedic arts finds Boaty McBoatface unacceptable. Instead we will have another pretentious Arctic Explorer or Nature Warrior. However, whatever the boring name Johnson and his cohorts come up with, it will always be Boaty McBoatface to those of us who loved her when she was new . . . and funny.

7 thoughts on “British Minister Scuttles Boaty McBoatface

  1. “Boaty” is a reference to a person who has high self esteem and wears a Captains Cap and a snotty uniform coat and perhaps white pants. A comment like this: “Who is the ‘boatie’ dork in the front of the line fingering the menu?”

    The name is a bit dorky. It implies something Irish in the works because of the two letters “Mc”. Most “Micks” are not tuned into boats and Micks are prone to sea sickness. If one couples Mc with Boat with Face then you squirrel three things together which don’t mix.

  2. Now that’s too bad. The name alone would draw the interest of school children around the world, and promote more interest in the sciences.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s