Thieving Maggie

By Darren Smith, Weekend Contributor

In an interesting reversal, a young Chinese child unseated the predominating meme of hungry birds stealing food from humans.

The setup played into the hands of the girl, who took charge of the unsuspecting avian and snatched a morsel directly from the victim dove’s beak. All while her unwitting accomplice–her mother–attracted the bird under the guise of feeding pigeons.


While it is surely satisfying to witness the vanquishing of the notion of birds always being the ones who succeed in this manner of theft, the production of this video could have benefited with appropriate irony the inclusion of a certain Rossini overture.

Undoubtedly, and like clockwork, she debuted her fledgling inner Kubrick.

By Darren Smith

The views expressed in this posting are the author’s alone and not those of the blog, the host, or other weekend bloggers. As an open forum, weekend bloggers post independently without pre-approval or review. Content and any displays or art are solely their decision and responsibility.

32 thoughts on “Thieving Maggie”

  1. This is why toddlers need to be supervised around animals. I’m surprised the little girl didn’t break the dove’s neck. It is more likely a white rock pigeon than the related dove, and pigeons get into trash and eat out of the gutter. As pretty as the bird is, I wouldn’t eat from its mouth. What I found strange is that her mother smiles for the camera when her daughter roughly grabbed a wild bird by the throat and took food out of its mouth. What did she think any toddler would do with food? Ah, look, how cute. Little sweetums is going to pop the head off this birdie.

    The little girl was absolutely adorable, and probably had no ideas she was hurting the bird.

            1. The Tempest: Act I, Scene 2,

              FERDINAND
              Where should this music be? I’ th’ air or th’ earth?

              It sounds no more, and sure, it waits upon

              Some god o’ th’ island. Sitting on a bank,

              Weeping again the king my father’s wrack,

              This music crept by me upon the waters,

              Allaying both their fury and my passion

              With its sweet air. Thence I have followed it,

              Or it hath drawn me rather. But ’tis gone.

              No, it begins again

              1. He do the police in different voices. Google it. Then, you will see where the “music crept by me” is probably most well known to reside. On a divan. Then, if you wish, I will point you to a very good series of videos that you can download, and listen to at your leisure. The best ever done, IMHO.

                Shantih!

                Squeeky Fromm
                Girl Reporter

                1. The blawg won’t take the link because the web address duplicates Squeeky’s comment.

                  P. S. I hate “The Waste Land” and Elliot, too. Bah Humbug!

                1. OMG. I’m culturally deficient. I honestly thought that The Tempest was one of your favorites. Does this also mean that you’re not 1/16th Chinook?

                2. All poets are plagiarists. Shakespeare especially. They say Chaucer started it. From whom did Geoff filch? Rabelais? Does it even matter? Bah Humbug!

                  1. Diane – Will Shakespeare probably did not have an original plot. However, it is what he did with the material that made him famous today. Besides, the man was writing two plays a year, plus acting and producing. Give the guy some slack.

                    BTW, there is a book from the 1750s that lists 37 separate plots and several more subplots that have been found from the time of Aristotle (found it while I was working on my thesis).

    1. Come, gather round, you sailor boys, and listen to my plea,
      When you’ve heard my tale, you’ll pity me,
      For I was a god-damned fool in the port of Liverpool,
      On the first time that I came home from sea.
      I was paid off at the Home, from the port of Sierr’ Leon’,
      Four-pound-ten a month was all my pay,
      And it jingled in my tin, till I was taken in,
      By a girl with the name of Maggie May.

      Oh Maggie, Maggie May they have taken her away
      To slave upon Van Diemen’s cruel shore.
      For she robbed so many sailors, and captains of the whalers
      But she’ll never stroll down Paradise Street no more.

      When I first met Maggie May, she took my breath away
      She was cruising up and down old Canning Place,
      She was dressed in a gown so fine, like a frigate of the line,
      So, me being a sailor, I gave chase.
      She gave me a saucy nod, and me, like a farmer’s clod,
      Let her take me line abreast in tow,
      And under all plain sail, we ran before the gale
      And to the Crow’s Nest Tavern we did go

      Oh Maggie, Maggie May they have taken her away
      To slave upon Van Diemen’s cruel shore.
      For she robbed so many sailors, and captains of the whalers
      But she’ll never stroll down Paradise Street no more.

      In the morning when I woke, I found that I was broke,
      I hadn’t got a penny to my name,
      So I had to pawn my suit, and my John L’s and my boots,
      Down in the Park Lane pawnshop number nine.
      Oh you thieving Maggie May, you robbed me of my pay,
      When I spent last night with you ashore.
      And the judge he guilty found her, of robbing a homeward-bounder,
      But she’ll never stroll down Paradise Street no more.

      Oh Maggie, Maggie May they have taken her away
      To slave upon Van Diemen’s cruel shore.
      For she robbed so many sailors, and captains of the whalers
      But she’ll never stroll down Paradise Street no more.

      She was chained and sent away from Liverpool one day,
      The lads they cheered as she sailed down the bay,
      Oh, and every sailor lad, he only was too glad
      That they’d sent the old girl off to Botany Bay.

      Oh Maggie, Maggie May they have taken her away

      To slave upon Van Diemen’s cruel shore.
      For she robbed so many sailors, and captains of the whalers
      But she’ll never stroll down Paradise Street no more.

    2. The mention of Clockwork Orange will always immediately give me the image of the guy strapped down, with his eyes pried open by clamps, forced to watch movies while they doused his eyes with saline. Freaky!

      1. Freedom and free enterprise – all conceivable, unalienable, natural and God-given rights.

        “Each” needs to get a job!

    1. PCS, wasn’t L4D originally and for the longest time Annie? I seem to remember the entity but I can’t place the name – a liberal nurse with a son in the military as I recall – was that she? That would explain her sudden and persisting disappearance. It’s as if the posts are the same – only the names have changed.

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