I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings: A Song In Sienna Shows The Irresistible Spirit Of The Italian People

As many of you know, I adore Italy (the land of my roots) and I have specifically written about my love for Sienna. This videotape of people spontaneously singing in Sienna is really quite moving. Asked to stay indoor due to the raging virus, the beauty of this culture seems irrepressible. There is a Pagliacci feel to this sorrowful but strong song that spontaneously broke out in the deserted streets of Sienna.

Between Caruso and Corona, I would bet on Caruso even under the lock down conditions of Italy.

It reminds me of Caged Bird by Maya Angelou:

The caged bird sings   
with a fearful trill   
of things unknown   
but longed for still   
and his tune is heard   
on the distant hill   
for the caged bird   
sings of freedom.

Here is the video:

49 thoughts on “I Know Why The Caged Bird Sings: A Song In Sienna Shows The Irresistible Spirit Of The Italian People”

  1. I believe we often overlook the qualities that help explain our survival as a species across every environment no matter how harsh – see the poles, deserts, and swamps – and through crisis and tragedies no matter how desperate – see the holocaust, famines, etc. With exceptions and with of course examples of bad behavior by humans in every kind of situation, mostly we do what we have to and with charity and selflessness for the benefit of all. This crisis abounds in examples of this and should give hope for our future, an outlook not usually popular.

    The progress made in civilization since WWII is irrefutable for those looking at facts. Human longevity, health, and even wealth are improved across all continents, though inequitably and each of our chances of being killed by another human are drastically lower than at any time preceding. The challenges ahead are daunting, but when haven’t they been? Are we smart enough to overcome challenges to our long term survival? Maybe, but there can be little doubt we have the heart and strength, and we are worth it. You can’t listen to Pavoritti or Louis Armstrong and think otherwise.

    1. “With exceptions and with of course examples of bad behavior by humans in every kind of situation, mostly we do what we have to and with charity and selflessness for the benefit of all. This crisis abounds in examples of this and should give hope for our future, an outlook not usually popular.”

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      Boy, do you need a psychology course there, Pollyanna. Guess you haven’t ventured out to buy toilet paper lately. People protect their own personal and familial interests first an then, if reasonably available resources exist, move on to others.

      1. Of course they do, then they do what helps others. Social bonds and obligations are strong for the vast majority of us.

          1. I did not say or imply that family does not comes first, as it does virtually all species.

            What differentiates us is our highly developed social order which extends beyond even our personal contacts to towns, counties, states, nations, and now the world population. Each of these extensions of loyalty raises the stakes and our power.

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