May Third Is World Press Freedom Day

World Press Freedom Day
By Darren Smith, Weekend Contributor

In honor of the day first proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in 1993 at the recommendation of UNESCO, and to garner attention to how press freedom fares twenty years later, Deutsche Welle has compiled a series highlighting the issues journalists and the public generally are facing.

Journalists in Danger

  1. Amnesty International Releases Damning Report on Pakistan’s Media Situation
    The situation for journalists has deteriorated since the restoration of democratic rule.
  2. Helping the pople of Bangladesh
    One of Bangladesh’s pre-eminent bloggers, Asif Mohiuddin, faced death threats and was forced to flee to Germany after denouncing Mosque and State issues, and being imprisoned.
  3. Kremlin Attacks Dissent On the Internet
    The Kremlin is going beyond just censorship and is stifling dissent on social media and the blogosphere.
  4. Journalists killed or missing in Syria
    Dozens of reporters have been killed or are missing after reporting on the Syrian Civil War.
  5. Impunity Index lists nations where journalists’ murders have remained unsolved
    Iraq is the top of the list where murder cases of journalists who cause controversy are the least likely to be properly investigated.

Standing up for Free Speech

  1. Reporters Without Borders hosts Wistleblower Debate
    A recent panel discussion sponsored by Reporters Without Borders showed the tension between journalists and intelligence agencies when it comes to whistleblowing.
  2. Pakistani Broadcaster risks ban for conflict with spy agency.
    A private news channel in Pakistan has come under sharp criticism for accusing the country’s military of attempting to kill one of its journalists. The country’s most popular channel now risks going off the air.
  3. Hong Kong protesters demand media freedom
    Protesters have rallied in Hong Kong to demand that the city government halt a perceived erosion of media freedom. Journalists claim mainland China is increasingly seeking to influence editorial decisions.
  4. Courage Foundation promotes defense of Whistleblowers
    A whisteblower rights group hosted an online interview and offered a method for individuals to contribute to Edward Snowden’s defense fund

Deutsche Welle offers in its article some case studies that are worthwhile reading, HERE

We all have a stake in freedom of the press and should today offer not only some reflection on what reporters and others endure in the struggle for liberty, we also should each take an active effort to promote this in our own countries and abroad since were are, in the end, the ones who can change things for the better.

For Further Reading, UNESCO provides additional perspectives on World Press Freedom Day.

By Darren Smith

Sources:
Deutsche Welle
UNESCO

The views expressed in this posting are the author’s alone and not those of the blog, the host, or other weekend bloggers. As an open forum, weekend bloggers post independently without pre-approval or review. Content and any displays or art are solely their decision and responsibility.

28 thoughts on “May Third Is World Press Freedom Day

  1. I would feel better if the UN did not keep electing rights violators to the watch groups.

  2. I was watching MSNBC yesterday. Andrea Mitchell, who claims to be a journalist, said Congress put John Kerry in even greater danger than he already is, by issuing him a subpoena while he is in South Sudan. Her credentials need to be revoked.

  3. With the category “Journalists in Danger”, I guess that means the US press in already dead without having to publish it.

  4. Has the president evolved to the point where he will at least not investigate those participating?

  5. The U.S. dropped to #46 on the list of “journalism is ok”:

    1-Finland
    2-Netherlands
    3-Norway
    4-Luxembourg
    5-Andorra
    6-Liechtenstein
    7-Denmark
    8-Iceland
    9-New Zealand
    10-Sweden
    11-Estonia
    12-Austria
    13-Czech Republic
    14-Germany
    15-Switzerland
    16-Ireland
    17-Jamaica
    18-Canada
    19-Poland
    20-Slovakia
    21-Costa Rica
    22-Namibia
    23-Belgium
    24-Cape Verde
    25-Cyprus
    26-Uruguay
    27-Ghana
    28-Australia
    29-Belize
    30-Portugal
    31-Suriname
    32-Lithuania
    33-United Kingdom
    34-Slovenia
    35-Spain
    36-Antigua and Barbuda
    37-Latvia
    38-El Salvador
    39-France
    40-Samoa
    41-Botswana
    42-South Africa
    43-Trinidad and Tobago
    44-Papua New Guinea
    45-Romania
    46-United States
    47-Haiti
    48-Niger
    49-Italy
    50-Taiwan

    (A Tale of Coup Cities – 9). At least we beat N. Korea.

  6. Dredd – given how little transparency there is in Obama administration, I am surprised we beat anyone.

  7. I can’t speak for the rest of the world, but here in the U.S., the press has done itself no favors.

    Being a “newsman” comes with responsibilities and many in the press have abdicated these responsibilities.

    Too many stories are not covered because of political correctness, career expediency, partisanship, and economics (money from both the right and the left intimidates the press).

    One brief example: many of the police abuse stories referenced in this blog are covered in depth by the British press. Why do we have to rely of a foreign press to report on the misdeeds of our cops?

    I (and I suspect many of the readers of this blog) follow foreign periodicals because we want greater depth and more analysis than is provided by our national press.

    Shame on much of the American press.

  8. In addition to the PC and political problem the American media spends too much time on the Kardasians and other fluff so that the market they serve isn’t interested in news. And the print media too often just follow the broadcasters.

  9. I misspoke.

    We also beat the Italians.

    They have a thing with dishonesty that beats us by only one point …”

    Actually the Italians be us by 49-46= 3 points on the who has the worst press.

    Sorry Italians, it was Haiti that beat us by only one point.

    The Italians even beat the Niger people.

    They beat a lot of people.

  10. We have a ton of former journalists (and I use the term loosely) in the WH. Where were we listed last year? Are we up or down?

  11. Freedoms???
    USA!!! USA!!! USA!!!

    We’re #46!
    We’re #46!
    We’re #46!

    … Check out them braggin’ points people.

  12. Stephen Colbert At The White House Correspondents Dinner

    This is the beginning of the “tuthi-ness” of Media press.
    … “Copy, paste, goodnight!”

  13. Notice that years before Snowden, right at the beginning, he mentioned that the military NSA was listening to everything.

    “If any of you at the tables need anything, just speak into the number on your table and the NSA will forward the message to those who serve you.” (paraphrased) …

  14. The attention given to investigative reporters (yes, there are a few left) is to find and punish the whistleblowers. Without sources, the reporters have trouble reporting.

  15. In more encouraging news…

    http://www.wingia.com/en/services/about_the_end_of_year_survey/global_results/7/33/

    Headlines
    – Despite a year of economic difficulty, almost 50% of people surveyed are more positive about 2014 than they were for 2013;
    – US, Canada and Australia are the countries where most people would like to live if they could;
    US is considered to be the greatest threat to peace in the world, followed by Pakistan and China;
    – Over a third of those surveyed believe the world would be a better place if there were more female politicians;
    – Now in its 37th year WIN/Gallup International End of Year Survey finds that since 1989 people in general have a more positive outlook on economic prosperity for the coming year.

  16. […] At Jonathan Turley’s website, Darren Smith wrote about Word Press Freedom Day and included, “Iraq is the top of the list where murder cases of journalists who cause controversy are the least likely to be properly investigated.”  AFP reported on World Press Freedom Day and noted: “The most dangerous thing we face at this point is the government employing (legal) articles more aggressively than before,” said Sarmad al-Taie, a columnist for Al-Mada newspaper and a frequent guest on current affairs television programmes. A warrant was issued for Taie’s arrest in January for criticising incumbent Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, who is seeking re-election after Wednesday’s general election.  […]

  17. […] At Jonathan Turley’s website, Darren Smith wrote about Word Press Freedom Day and included, “Iraq is the top of the list where murder cases of journalists who cause controversy are the least likely to be properly investigated.”  AFP reported on World Press Freedom Day and noted: “The most dangerous thing we face at this point is the government employing (legal) articles more aggressively than before,” said Sarmad al-Taie, a columnist for Al-Mada newspaper and a frequent guest on current affairs television programmes. A warrant was issued for Taie’s arrest in January for criticising incumbent Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, who is seeking re-election after Wednesday’s general election.  […]

  18. […] At Jonathan Turley’s website, Darren Smith wrote about Word Press Freedom Day and included, “Iraq is the top of the list where murder cases of journalists who cause controversy are the least likely to be properly investigated.”  AFP reported on World Press Freedom Day and noted: “The most dangerous thing we face at this point is the government employing (legal) articles more aggressively than before,” said Sarmad al-Taie, a columnist for Al-Mada newspaper and a frequent guest on current affairs television programmes. A warrant was issued for Taie’s arrest in January for criticising incumbent Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki, who is seeking re-election after Wednesday’s general election.  […]

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