Honk, If You Love Jesus: Florida Extends State Advancement of Religion to License Plates

Florida is continuing its struggle against the separation of church and state with a new promotion of religion: special license plates for the faithful. The legislature is considering a plate featuring a Christian cross, a stained-glass church window and the words “I Believe.” The sponsor of this unconstitutional measure is Rep. Edward Bullard who sees absolutely no difference between vanity plates and divinity plates. This is no doubt an effort to close the license gap with Iran, which has a “Honk if You Love Allah” plate.

Bullard insists that there is no difference between his religious plates and plates supporting a university or football team — missing the minor point that the first amendment is not written to prevent the entanglement of the state and the Dolphins. It is merely, he says, “something they believe in.”

The state already has a plate with the motto “Family First,” which funds Sheridan House, a Christian organization prompting aspects of faith.

For the full story, click here.

39 thoughts on “Honk, If You Love Jesus: Florida Extends State Advancement of Religion to License Plates”

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  2. Liked your ideas!, and Patty C., like your “take no prisoners” approach to pharmacy!
    ——
    Hardly medievial – I would be asserting my property rights.

    If a pharmacist did not wish to fill my prescription, I would expect him/her to hand the scrip back to me, so I could fill it elsewhere.

  3. Bob,

    I forgot to add that I loved the plague of frogs!!! After reading today’s posting on Yoo I suggest soothing digestive teas all around.

    Best,

    Jill

  4. Bob,

    You have a wonderful humor (are you a pitta? If so, you can purchase cooling digestive teas on line:) )! Patty C. went medieval on pharmacy with her post on the ethical doctor who refused to treat some sleezy “untouchables” who deserved to die anyway….

    I’ll definitely check his lordship’s link but please count me out of that collective!

    Jill

  5. jonolan,

    “Also, I’m actually a pantheistic Pagan. I don’t have a specific problem with the worship of any God or Spirit.”

    A pantheistic pagan with no problems?

    How about the Easter Bunny and those god-damned Easter eggs?

    And another thing; who started the myth about dolphins being superior to frogs?

    When Moses needed help freeing the Jews from Egypt, did God send a bunch of attention-craved sell-outs like the dolphins?

    No.

    He sent frogs; The Big Guy’s first attempt at making humans — at least according to C.G. Jung.

    And that’s all I have to say about that.

  6. Mespo,

    “What do you call a religion where all of its followers have died or abandoned it?”

    A ‘Mything link?’

    “It’s mythology.”

    That’s what I said.

    “So much for universal truths, or divine beings.”

    How about archetypes of the collective unconscious?

    “Is Woden still patrolling the Teutonic forests? Think Zeus is still hiking Mt. Olympus?”

    In a non-spacio-temporal manner of speaking; yes.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hero_with_a_Thousand_Faces

    Regards,

    Bob

  7. Jill,

    What is a ‘“take no prisoners” approach to pharmacy?’

    If an explanation requires foot-noting a joke; I apologize in advance.

    Regards,

    Bob

  8. jonolan,

    I did think about what you wrote. I can’t agree with the crack about the ACLU and feel it’s off point. Bob was joking about license plate wars, but only barely. I know the state of Florida isn’t going to allow an “I Heart Satan” vanity plate. The state does not stay neutral and thus ends up endorsing religion(s) it chooses. Bumper stickers allow private individuals to state their beliefs in no uncertain terms. They really are open to anyone of any belief or no belief at all.

    Jill

  9. Mespo, you were correct in calling jonolan out – he thought he was being witty and clever in likening the ACLU to his imaginary
    ‘Atheists Civil Litigation Union’.

    The point of the Constitution, Civil liberties, the Women’s Right’s Movement, and the ACLU is choice i.e. freedom.

    No matter what, whether it’s religion at issue or no religion – it makes no difference.

    Jonolan, get a clue – Wake up or Shut up.

    p.s Your creepy thumbnail mask thing-a-ma-gig coupled with your commentary is very telling – in a black n’ white kinda way…
    not good, in my view.

  10. janolan:

    I guess I wasn’t clear. Private individuals and institutions can have whatever they like displayed, including churches and mosques. That’s why I don’t object to fishes of Greek letters or Wicken displays. The objection is to State sponsored public displays of religion or paganism or atheism for that matter. I should not have to see State promoted religious thought of any description since it is by its nature an endorsement and hence divisive.

  11. OK, I can’t type tonight. That should have been “By your argument churches couldn’t have cross and mosques couldn’t have Call to Prayer since you see or hear them.”

  12. mespo727272,

    By your argument churches could have cross and mosques could have Call to Prayer since you see or hear them.

    Also, I’m actually a pantheistic Pagan. 😀 I don’t have a specific problem with the worship of any God or Spirit.

    Despite your atheistic assertions, it’s NOT unconstitutional to have religious icons or sayings on state provided items or property. It is only unconstitutional if such things are limited to only one – or possibly a limited few – religions or sects.

  13. Bob,Esq:

    What do you call a religion where all of its followers have died or abandoned it? It’s mythology. So much for universal truths, or divine beings. Is Woden still patrolling the Teutonic forests? Think Zeus is still hiking Mt. Olympus? Interesting how everybody is an atheist to some religion, or even most religions.

  14. janolan:

    I have no problem with expressions of religion on your vehicle. Put all the little fishes or Greek letters or Stars of David that you like on your bumper. I object to the State sanctioning one or any religion or no religion for that matter. Putting it on license plates places the imprimatur of the State on a religious expression and it is patently unconstitutional. By the way, I do have a constitutional right to be free from exposure to religion, as I may leave any private function where such expressions are taking place. I should not be forced, however, to leave the public highways to avoid such expressions. I take it you agree that I have a right to be free from religion since your clarification did not address that point. I suppose you want the same right since even you are an atheist to various other religions (Janism, Buddhism, Poseidon worship, Baalists, etc.), and would not want to be forced to experience that spirituality against your consent.

  15. Bob,

    You left out a vital part of the quote from Jung, one that ruins your entire argument…it actually reads”…the relationship of the individual to God AS EXPRESSED ON METAL PLATES ATTACHED TO MOVING VEHICALS…”. I believe Jung wrote this after seeing a pink Escalade with the twin religious symbols; 1. of the goddess, Mary Kay and 2. her consort represented on the metal plate simply as: He Reigns.

    Liked your ideas!, and Patty C., like your “take no prisoners” approach to pharmacy!

    Jill

  16. “Religion . . . is an instinctive attitude peculiar to man, and its manifestations can be followed all through human history.

    A creed is a confession of faith intended chiefly for the world at large and is thus an intramundane affair, while the meaning and purpose of religion lie in the relationship of the individual to God (Christianity, Judaism, Islam) or to the path of salvation and liberation (Buddhism).”

    [“The Undiscovered Self,” C.G. Jung, CW 10, par. 512, 507.]

    “The Constitution of the U. S. forbids everything like an establishment of a national religion.”

    http://press-pubs.uchicago.edu/founders/documents/amendI_religions64.html

    Given how intangible the concept of religion is, me thinks Madison was referring to creed.

    Nonetheless,

    Thou shalt not attach thy Lord’s name to vanity plates.

  17. Jill,

    How about…

    “There are your enemies, [the Neocons and the fascists]. They are ours, or this night Molly Stark sleeps a widow.”

    Regards,

    Bob

  18. mespo727272,

    Let me clarify my position since I’ve failed to communicate with you. By “Freedom From Religion” I meant freed from exposure to religion. That is what the ACLU is striving for – IMHO.

    Where is the problem with someone of faith having a religious license plate? You don’t have to have one. On the other I don’t see where the atheists have the right to say one of the faith can’t have one.

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