Minnesota Woman Poses With Prize Deer For Hunting Site . . . Later Charged With Illegal Hunting

Valery Vawn Wright, 49, of Two Harbors is shown on a website posing with her prize 199 pound buck. The photo may now be part of a criminal case against her for allegedly baiting deer and hunting without a license.

Wright is charged with shooting two deer while hunting over bait and hunting without a valid license. The two deer had attracted many onlookers at the nearby golf course due to their large size and beautiful racks. Hunters, however, were also interested in the bucks as trophies, including Wright.

She was discovered with one of the dead bucks at a stand after people complained of someone hunting within city limits. The stand appears to have been placed just outside of the city limits. However, officers found the ground covered with carrots and grain to attract deer. Wright reportedly admitted to coming out the week before hunting season to drop grain to bring the deer under the stand to be shot. I remain perplexed why it is so much fun to sit in a stand over baited ground to shoot an animal feeding.

These violations remain only misdemeanors for hunting deer over a baited area as well as for hunting without a valid deer license and for having deer over her limit. She is also charged with gross misdemeanors for transporting an illegally taken animal and for taking or possessing wild animals with a restitution value of more than $1,000.

Wright insists that she was not aware that she had to rake up the bait before killing the deer. For that reason, she insists “[t]he charges on the first deer are being disputed.”

She posted her trophy picture on http://www.northlandoutdoors.com) which ran with picture with a caption that reads: “Val Wright of Two Harbors shot this 10 point buck on opening day south of Silver Bay that dressed out at 199 pounds.”

That should be helpful in her prosecution.

Source: Duluth News

30 thoughts on “Minnesota Woman Poses With Prize Deer For Hunting Site . . . Later Charged With Illegal Hunting”

  1. To I Arthur Randolph Erb, who wrote this inane comment:
    “I guess that hunting without a license is FAR worse than driving without one, or not having insurance or having the car not registered. If she committed a crime, I hope that they will make such motor vehicle violations at least a crime of some sort. I think that such conduct is a lot more serious and injurious to the public than shooting deer on ones own place. …”

    Where to start…First, it IS a crime in every state of the union to drive without a license; I am pretty darn sure all of them require vehicle registration and insurance as well..What planet do you live on?

    Second..this was on a public golf course..not “her own place”, Besides, even if it was her own property she LURED the deer there with food. They would have been safely out of reach if she hadn’t baited them. That IS a crime, and should be. I do not consider hunting a “sport” under any circumstances, but even those who DO agree that luring an animal to a wide open spot, hiding in the bushes, and then shooting it while it feeds is a disgusting display of “unsportsmanlike conduct.”

    Finally, I believe that killing for any reason other than self-defense or for NECESSARY food is morally reprehensible. Hunting glamorizes killing and encourages the use of firearms;THIS kind of killing role-models the blatant victimization of helpless animals. These crimes pose a far worse threat to society than driving without a license. (although, certainly, I don’t condone that either..)

    The woman should go to jail. But, given the laws where she lives she will almost certainly get a $50 fine and then go out and do it again next week.

    1. I just checked on drving without your license on you, and it is not a crime. In Texas not having a license at all, is a small crime, a misdemeanor with NO jail time and only a $200 fine. I saw that in California they have made illegals immune from all traffic laws and crimes such as driving with NO license at all. The bill that they passed removed the ability of cops at DUI checkpoints to arrest drivers and impound cars who have no license, insurance, or registration. Since they have no valids IDs either, they can just give false names and addresses or use forged documents or fake IDs and they are scott free. So as not to discriminate against US citizens, I have to assume that we can do the same and claim that we have no ID either and give a fake name and address too. Thus effectively, CA no longer considers driving without a license to be a crime at all.

      As a goose and duck hunter, I use a lot of decoys to lure them into shooting range. Otherwise, I won’t get many shots at them. They are hard to hit too, especially ducks which go near supersonic in hunting season. Since you feel that all hunting is bad, I guess your only recourse is to get the legislature to ban it. Of course, hunters are the mainstay of Fish and Game depts which manage the wildlife, and are the most fervent conservationists too. You must really hate Teddy Roosevelt even though he was one of our most progressive Presidents and even ran on the Progressive Party ticket. He was a well known hunter and conservationist by the way. After he left office, he went on an African safari to bag some big game which he donated to the museums. His enemy, Jay Gould, remarked that he hoped that every lion would do its duty when TR left on his trip..

      As for helpless animnals, they are not quite so helpless as many an overeager deer hunter has found out when they get stomped by their wounded quarry. A lot of my friends are bow hunters, and that is a real challenge. I guess that would also meet with your hatred. So there is no reasoning with you other than to say that you hate guns, TR, the Olympics, since they encourage the use of firearms and weapons, conservation, and most everything else you can think of and demand that the rest of us conform to your desires.

  2. VENTURA: OK, all right. Then I’m going to-I’m going to disagree with you on this one, because for those who don’t know what bear baiting is, they take a bag of jelly doughnuts, they stick it out there, and little Yogi comes along and thinks he’s found the mother load.

    NUGENT: Well, Jesse…

    VENTURA: Wait a minute, Ted, wait a minute. So for seven days…

    NUGENT: Share with us your last baiting experience.

    VENTURA: For seven days, they’ll throw those doughnuts out there. So Yogi comes back, he comes back, and he comes back.

    NUGENT: Yogi…

    VENTURA: They may sit up in a tree. They take a .44 Magnum and they shoot Yogi in the back of the head.

    NUGENT: Yogi…

    VENTURA: So they can save his skull. Ted, that isn’t hunting, Ted.

    NUGENT: Not even close. Not even close.

    VENTURA: That is an ambush. That is an assassination. Hunting is where you have to have ability and where there’s some danger involved. Now, if you wanted to get down on the ground, buck knife with the bear with the buck knife…

    NUGENT: I’d like that.

  3. Mike:

    “Mike to Roger:

    “Yet I’ve known real hunters who were into the true sport and ate what they’d killed. I can appreciate them on an intellectual level, though viscerally it is not my cup of tea.”

    You and I agree.”

    Yes, we do! Sorry to give the impression that we did not. I should have amplified that agreement, rather than having my comment look like a criticism. Sigh – the internet.

  4. “You really, REALLY don’t want the people who don’t know anything about guns, wildlife or the outdoors to be traipsing around the woods with rifles and shotguns–or bows, for that matter.”

    Well, that is true, but it certainly was not my point.

    My point is that it is somewhat hypocritical for the typical American consumer to feel morally superior to hunters when it comes to the cruelty of killing animals for food. Hunters recognize that what they will be eating was a living creature, and that it was their actions as a predator which took away its life.

    Modern consumers have no experience of the act of killing, or feeling of responsibility for the lives of the creatures which die for their consumption, because these acts are done by someone else and out of sight and mind. They are completely divorced from the concept of the value of the lives of these billions of vital, conscious beings that are sacrificed by proxy each year.

    This, of course, is not true for hunters, who, in my opinion, have an ethical standing at least as high as those who would criticize their actions from a moral basis.

  5. Roger,

    “Indeed, I believe that it would be a good thing if everyone had to slaughter at least one food animal themselves at least once in their lifetime. It is a transformative experience . . .”

    I agree with this statement, not from any hunting experience but from raising turkeys and chickens on a small scale many years ago.

    The most transformative experience along these lines that I have had is butchering a turkey with the name Viola. Anyway, to make a long story short, I felt I betrayed Viola’s trust in me (as someone who fed her everyday) by luring her into a position where I could slit her throat.

    I regret this action to this day and this is a significant reason why I haven’t eaten animal protein in thirty-some years. It’s a personal choice of course, and I cause no grief for carnivores (quadrupeds or bipeds), but I do understand and agree with your above quote.

  6. democommie

    i’ve seen a lot of people in the woods during hunting season that had no business with a loaded firearm.

    and in most states, unlike a drivers license, you don’t need to pass a test to get a hunting license, just pay the fee.

    1. That number of nuts with guns is why I only hunt on leases. In the national forest near me, I have a better chance of getting shot than shooting a deer.

  7. Roger Lambert:

    “What does that make the 99.999 per cent of us who pay someone else to raise and slaughter our food”? Consumers.

    You really, REALLY don’t want the people who don’t know anything about guns, wildlife or the outdoors to be traipsing around the woods with rifles and shotguns–or bows, for that matter.

    The “You don’t hunt, so shut up, that’s why!”, is a meme that I’ve heard thousands of times over the last 60+ years. It doesn’t wash. Even in the days before the invention of gunpowder there were hunters, gatherers and tradespeople. Even in non-agrarian nomadic societies only a percentage of the tribe hunted. If everyone hunts you wind up with wounded, lost, frozen,fried, snakebit and otherwise injured parties. You also wind up with a lot of botched kills.

    Be happy if you’re a hunter, let the rest of us be happy that we’re not.

  8. “I find it difficult to mete out moral disapprobation toward hunters, especially those who eat their kill.”

    Mike to Roger:

    “Yet I’ve known real hunters who were into the true sport and ate what they’d killed. I can appreciate them on an intellectual level, though viscerally it is not my cup of tea.”

    You and I agree.

  9. Hey Arthur… where does it say she was shooting on her own property? The Duluth article doesn’t identify where the stand was besides “outside city limits”. One might ASSUME somebody wouldn’t be stupid enough to build a stand on property-not-their-own, but from the rest of the story, this gal wasn’t very bright in some directions…

    1. I would hope that hunters would READ the game laws and at least she had enough snap to not do it within city limits. So she had some sense if not much sportsmanship.

      I think that those who think what she did was bad should remember that our number one conservationist and founder of the Boone and Crockett Club was Teddy Roosevelt and I would NEVER call him not a sportsman and good hunter.

      I would hope that others would also agree that driving without a license of any kind should be a crime as well. I think that is a more important kind of license to have than a hunting license.

  10. Mike said:

    :…This woman is not by my lights a true follower of the sport, merely someone needing ego gratification by killing easy prey….”

    What does that make the 99.999 per cent of us who pay someone else to raise and slaughter our food – our easy prey – for us, usually in conditions that are completely inhumane (for lack of a better word) compared to the natural life that the deer in the photo enjoyed?

    Unless someone is a vegan Buddhist who would not drive an automobile so as not to murder mosquitoes on his windshield, I find it difficult to mete out moral disapprobation toward hunters, especially those who eat their kill.

    Indeed, I believe that it would be a good thing if everyone had to slaughter at least one food animal themselves at least once in their lifetime. It is a transformative experience, I can tell you, as a former hunter.

    There are millions of Americans who have never even seen a live chicken, pig, or cow yet take a moral high ground when it comes to hunting. I don’t think they have thought it all through.

  11. Quick question – if the photos of this woman were on a site which automatically listed copyright protections, such as “You may not use these photos for any purpose without the artist’s express permission”, would they be admissible as evidence?

  12. No gun … we use bow and arrow. No stand or baiting … we track. No individual kills … one deer provides enough venison for 2 families so depending on the number of families represented, the hunting stops when the correct number of deer have been shot. No pictures and no heads for mounting … no need to brag about putting food on the table.

  13. I would never hunt, barring an apocolypse. Yet I’ve known real hunters who were into the true sport and ate what they’be killed. I can appreciate them on an intellectual level, though viscerally it is not my cup of tea. This woman is not by my lights a true follower of the sport, merely someone needing ego gratification by killing easy prey. She is in the same league as those rich assholes who fly into Africa to shoot staked animals as trophy’s. Throw the book at her.

  14. Baiting is a common tactics for poachers as well as people intent on committing cruel acts on animals, hence why there are laws about it, and hunting licenses too are to help from people being stupid and just shooting animals whenever, and wherever, like in a residential area. Hello! (Not to mention to curb people from hunting animals for meat and other products to sell illegally. Improperly handled, improperly transported, poached wild game meat, anyone?) The term “redneck” with all its bigoted, prerogative connotations comes to mind. This just seems to be odd confluence of circumstances that, if the person wasn’t so damn eager to get a prize winning buck, she could have avoided. As for this:

    “I remain perplexed why it is so much fun to sit in a stand over baited ground to shoot an animal feeding.”

    Aside from the too biggest reasons–poaching and cruelty–there’s the simple, universal fact that humans are stupid. They really are. And we seem most capable of displaying that stupidity when it comes to how we view and treat other life on this planet. She wanted a trophy–to win a prize and show off to other humans for their approval, because she apparently can’t get ego strokes and a sense of accomplishment elsewhere, Posing with a dead animal would give her something a brag about. So she baited the animal to come across the city limits thinking that would make it OK to kill it for her ego. And I’m suppose to feel civil rights sympathy for this idiot? How different would this conversation be if she had accidentally shot a curious bypasser who had just wanted to watch the deer, thinking “Hey no one will shoot it–there’s a golf course, businesses and houses around here”?

  15. I guess that hunting without a license is FAR worse than driving without one, or not having insurance or having the car not registered. If she committed a crime, I hope that they will make such motor vehicle violations at least a crime of some sort. I think that such conduct is a lot more serious and injurious to the public than shooting deer on ones own place.

  16. This reminds me of my favorite hunting story form my youth. Being friends with the County Sheriff’s son, I was invited for a Spring turkey hunt. Being a novice, the Sheriff took great pains to explain to me the intricacies of turkey hunting and the game laws that he said his best friend, the State Game Warden, would surely enforce when he invariably met up with us in the woods. The Sheriff and his son bagged their birds early leaving me to try my luck. Not even a shot fired by me. The Game Warden did make it by and the Sheriff proudly showed him the catch awaiting the perfunctory congratulations. They were a tad muted when we discovered the Sheriff had bagged a hen instead of a young male “jake” bird as he thought. As it was out of season, he got the ticket and I got a fine story.

Comments are closed.