Yee of Little Faith: Brady Agent Attacks NFL and Alleges Collusion With Colts After Suspension Over Deflated Balls

As expected, the NFL has suspended New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady and imposed team sanctions for “deflategate.” As we discussed this week, the NFL investigation found rejected the claims of innocence in all of the balls being deflated after inspection in the New England’s AFC title game against Indianapolis in January. The NFL report stated “We found these claims not plausible and contradicted by other evidence.” The report found that Brady “was at least generally aware” of all the plans to prepare the balls to his liking and that it was “more probable than not” that two Patriots employees – officials’ locker room attendant Jim McNally and equipment assistant John Jastremski – carried out the plan. McNally is accused of demanding expensive shoes and signed footballs, jerseys and cash. Now, Don Yee, the agent for New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady, has lashed out at the NFL and suggested a bizarre pre-game collusion between the NFL and the Colts.

The sanction against the team is tough, though some felt that Brady should have been banned for the year. Most people agree that the deflation of these balls were not some colossal coincidence but an act of cheating by a team that has a checkered history of violations. Indeed, the Patriots are viewed by some of having a problematic team culture in terms of allegations of cheating. That may have deepened the resolve of the NFL to come down hard in this case. The Patriots will lose their first-round selection in the 2016 NFL Draft and fourth-round selection in the 2017 draft. The team will also pay a $1 million fine and locker room attendant Jim McNally and equipment assistant John Jastremski have been indefinitely suspended. However, it was the four game suspension of Brady that was the step too far for Yee.

Yee insisted that Brady did cooperate with the investigation and that the investigation lacked standards and objectivity. However it is this ditty that most surprised me:

“The report also presents significant evidence the NFL participated with the Colts in some type of pre-AFC Championship Game planning regarding the footballs. This fact may raise serious questions about the integrity of the games we view on Sundays.”

What exactly does that suggest? It sounds like Yee is alleging a trap set for the Patriots and Brady. That seems more than paranoia. It seems positively delusional.

Yee then states “[t]he NFL has a well-documented history of making poor disciplinary decisions that often are overturned.” Of course, the Patriots have their now damning history of cheating that makes the teams a recidivist in the eyes of many football fans. If one assumes that this was no coincidence and that the balls were intentionally deflated for a quarterback who previously stated a preference for under-inflated balls, it does not matter that the Patriots were clearly the stronger team in the championship game. It was an act of cheating. The team sanctions in that sense are unassailable except to the extent that they are viewed as too lenient. The report clearly does not include smoking gun piece of evidence tying Brady to the deflation. However, absent a confession, it was unlikely to find such evidence. The assumption is that the deflation was not just done for Brady (who will be unpaid for the four games) but that he had to notice the difference (as other players and the referees). It also did not help that Brady not only called the whole matter “ridiculous” and denied any knowledge of pressure issues related to the balls — a press conference people found highly implausible and evasive. Nevertheless, that case against Brady is clearly a circumstantial case however.

Yee accused the NFL of “playing games on Park Avenue” but fails to explain what the point of this game would be. It is hard to believe that the NFL relishes such actions. The question is what is to be done when there is strong circumstantial evidence of cheating.

What do you think?

Here is the entire Yee statement:

“The discipline is ridiculous and has no legitimate basis. In my opinion, this outcome was pre-determined; there was no fairness in the Wells investigation whatsoever. There is no evidence that Tom directed footballs be set at pressures below the allowable limits. In fact, the evidence shows Tom clearly emphasized that footballs be set at pressures within the rules. Tom also cooperated with the investigation and answered every question presented to him. The Wells Report presents significant evidence, however, that the NFL lacks standards or protocols with respect to its handling of footballs prior to games; this is not the fault of Tom or the Patriots. The report also presents significant evidence the NFL participated with the Colts in some type of pre-AFC Championship Game planning regarding the footballs. This fact may raise serious questions about the integrity of the games we view on Sundays. We will appeal, and if the hearing officer is completely independent and neutral, I am very confident the Wells Report will be exposed as an incredibly frail exercise in fact-finding and logic. The NFL has a well-documented history of making poor disciplinary decisions that often are overturned when truly independent and neutral judges or arbitrators preside, and a former federal judge has found the commissioner has abused his discretion in the past, so this outcome does not surprise me. Sadly, today’s decision diminishes the NFL as it tells its fans, players and coaches that the games on the field don’t count as much as the games played on Park Avenue.”

64 thoughts on “Yee of Little Faith: Brady Agent Attacks NFL and Alleges Collusion With Colts After Suspension Over Deflated Balls

  1. Forgotwho, My problem is his, and the Patriot’s arrogance, in not cooperating w/ the investigation. I mentioned in a previous thread on this topic that the dirty secret is all QB’s do this to varying degrees and are pooping their pants.

    Regarding the lying, degenerate gambler, Pete Rose. He committed the CARDINAL SIN. He bet on baseball. And, then he lied about it. I may change my mind when he’s in the ground. But, while that lying SOS walks this earth, he should not be in the HOF. Ask me a few years after he’s dead. I might change my mind. But, probably not.

    Golf is, without question, the most honorable sport. There are hundreds of examples of honor, that often go unreported because they are routine, than the few examples of dishonor. The fact that Tiger would provide an example of dishonor on the course is not surprising. He did many examples off the course. I’m glad Lindsey Vonn dumped his ass.

    • Nick – it is interesting that you should talk of all these rules. ASU has been bringing in officials in the off-season to teach the players exactly what the rules are for their position.

      Tiger Woods has an addiction. People with addictions sometimes slip. It appears that Tiger slipped and he is paying for it. Some never stay on the wagon.

      You have a real problem with invisible disabilities, don’t you? You are a walking lawsuit.

  2. Seriously you just said that. In fact, you don’t know Brady and you don’t know what he “is” or isn’t. Is it possible you are talking, with some degree of expertise, about yourself as you disparage him? Are you positive that nothing similar has ever occurred in the NFL over more than a century of play? 1.5 lbs. or air pressure. No other quarterback ever manipulated the ball pre-game and officials have always made the correct call and had NO bearing on the outcome of game? Do you imagine there is any player in the NFL taking illegal steroids as we speak?

    Seriously.

    To paraphrase, “the greatest player ever…NEVER should go into the HOF.” Is it about baseball?

    And this is great; Tiger Woods is caught cheating on a ball drop after his ball fell in the water hazard, and he was not disqualified. After exposure of Tiger Woods’ global philandering, confidentiality, misinformation, disinformation covert ops enterprise, which was created and funded by PGA money, the assignation of “honor” to pro golf is dubious at best. There’s never been anything dishonorable in the PGA? Let’s google that.

  3. Jim22, I admit I am biased. Brady is a smug, a-hole and I am biased against all smug a-holes. You will note I never questioned his ability, only his integrity and an offhanded slap @ his intelligence. Obviously you can’t be a great QB and not be smart. And, he is a great QB on a very successful CHEATING franchise. I HATE cheaters and liars. Pete Rose was one of the greatest players ever. But he is a lying, degenerate gambler, SOS and NEVER should go into the HOF. Barry Bonds should not have Hank Aaron’s record and should not ever even get a vote for HOF. I think you’re getting my drift. Although I don’t golf, I love the honor of that sport.

  4. Nick,
    Your preconceived hatred for Brady I think is clouding your judgment skills. I’m not sure why you seem to hate him. He is most likely the greatest ever and I dig that he took less money so the Pat’s could get better players. This decision has paid off well for him since he now has yet another SB ring. And, I’m not a Pat’s fan (Although I do enjoy watching Pat’s haters suffer,). When I still enjoyed football, I was a Viking fan.

  5. Rick,

    Have you read anything? Where in the report does it say that Anderson recoded his measurements.

    Again, From the report.
    “NFL game officials are not required to, and do not as a matter of standard practice, record in writing the pressure measurements taken during their pre-game inspections of game balls. We credit Anderson‟s recollection of the pre-game measurements taken on the day of the AFC Championship Game based on both the level of confidence Anderson expressed in his recollection and the consistency of his recollection with information provided by each of the Patriots and Colts regarding their target inflation levels.”

    “Recollection” is not the same thing as documenting. You are wrong again, there was no pregame documentation of the pressures.

    You also have no answer for the gauge issue because there is non. It can’t be proven that the Patriots did anything wrong.

  6. Jim22
    1, May 12, 2015 at 4:13 pm
    Rick, I at least I gave you a source. And that source is referencing the report. All you have provided is your assumptions based on nothing.

    1. The balls were initially properly inflated.
    By who? Was it documented? By what gages? Where the gauges calibrated and certified ?

    Rick, “By the referees, and yes it was documented. The rest of your questions are irrelevant.”

    Apparently you are wrong again.

    From the report – “NFL game officials are not required to, and do not as a matter of standard
    practice, record in writing the pressure measurements taken during their pre-game inspections of
    game balls.”

    So to be clear, referees don’t normally document the pressure but did so in this case because of the Colt’s complaint. From this you conclude I’m wrong to say the pressure in this case was documented. This is just another example of how your desire to exonerate the Patriots has corrupted your ability to analyze facts in this case.

  7. I was wrong. Earlier in this thread I said baseball would be prudent to step up the security of their balls but that sports are never proactive. I need to remind myself the idiot Cheeshead Bud Selig is no longer commish. MLB changed their policy regarding ball security. The article in USA Today did not say if umpires have returned to rubbing up game balls w/ mud. But, umpires had gotten lax in giving ball boys the keys to their room to get more balls if the supply on the filed runs low. Now, MLB security have that task. Maybe we got us a real commish now!

  8. Aaron Rodgers won Jeopardy tonight. I don’t believe he cheated. I don’t think Brady would win competing against middle school kids.

  9. LOL! People are required to do all types of things for employment. The world is not Schulteville., Regular polygraphs are required for employment in the public and private sector, peeing in a cup[he has to do that as well] all sorts of intrusive requirements Pauly. You can be so freakin’ tedious.

    • Nick – I refuse to work for places that require polygraphs and I have a deal with any place that makes me pee in a cup. They pee in a cup in the next stall at the same time I do. Still I do not have to give up my emails and I refuse to turn over the passwords to my social media accounts.

      My world is Schulteville and live in it very comfortably.

  10. IT”S NOT A COURT OF LAW!! He has no 5th amendment rights. It is a disciplinary proceeding. He is contractually obligated to cooperate w/ disciplinary proceedings. He did not. He is paying the price. Try and keep up to speed.

    • Nick – I have never worked anywhere that I was contractually obligated to turn over my emails. Have you? Do you have a copy of his contract? You are not usually required to put your own neck in the noose.

  11. Nick – not reply still does not make him guilty of anything. It is the same as the cop saying let us search your car. If you have nothing to hide you should let us do it. Is Brady compelled by some contractual obligation to turn over text messages? I wouldn’t do it just on principle.

  12. Again, Brady has never “stated a preference for under-inflated balls”. He has, however, stated that he prefers his game balls set at the league minimum of 12.5 psi. It’s not up to him to ensure they stay at that level consistently throughout the game.

    Jim22 — Your penalty ruling suggestion at 9:14 AM is one of the funniest comments I’ve read about this situation!

  13. Brady is getting screwed, four game suspension without pay. $7 million dollar salary for 16 games equals $437,500 per game times 4 games equals $1,750,000 that patriots save in payroll to Brady. The patriots pay a $1million fine and save $750,000 in payroll. The team is home free except for some draft choices, It’s a joke

  14. Please, for the love of God, let him keep playing football.

    Gisele is going to start singing. Please, just make it stop. Make it stop.

  15. The question comes down to how much air one has to have in one’s balls to be a patriot. I would say none. We can be patriots without reproducing or enjoying sex. Air in the balls gets in the way of fun and games. Why cant the ref grab the ball and feel it? Not enough air then throw it to the side. Baseball would not have this problem. The umpires feed the balls into the game not the players. Problem solved. I blame the head of the NFL. We need to call this AirGate.

  16. Rick, I at least I gave you a source. And that source is referencing the report. All you have provided is your assumptions based on nothing.

    1. The balls were initially properly inflated.
    By who? Was it documented? By what gages? Where the gauges calibrated and certified ?

    Rick, “By the referees, and yes it was documented. The rest of your questions are irrelevant.”

    Apparently you are wrong again.

    From the report – “NFL game officials are not required to, and do not as a matter of standard
    practice, record in writing the pressure measurements taken during their pre-game inspections of
    game balls.”

    From the report – “Although Anderson’s best recollection is that he used the Logo Gauge, he said that it is certainly possible that he used the Non-Logo Gauge”

    There is no way you can read that and come to the conclusion that the Patriots did anything wrong.

    Did you bother to read anything? Facts hurt don’t they?

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