Colorado Teen Outbid In Effort To Buy Late Father’s Patrol Car, Then . . .

Screen Shot 2015-05-18 at 7.29.42 AMYou may have seen this story but I wanted to share it. With all of the lousy stuff going on around the world from ISIS killing prisoners to companies clear cutting the Amazon, there are occasionally a glimpse into the potential of humankind. Recently, Tanner Brownlee raised $3000 to buy his father’s patrol car, a Charger with 147,000 miles. His Dad was killed in the line of duty in 2010 after he and other officers pursued a suspected car thief into a subdivision after a high-speed chase. However, at the auction to raise money for C.O.P.S. (a fund for widows and orphans of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty) he found himself outbid by someone who seemed intent on buying the car. Then something wonderful happened.

Brownlee could not compete with the other bidders who pushed the price of the bar to an amazing $60,000. He appeared crest-fallen in the video after rancher Steve Wells claimed the keys. Wells then turned around, walked over, and said, “Tanner, here’s your car.”

Wells then refused to speak with the media because he did not want to take away from the moment.

It is a moment that we can all relish, frankly. It is so powerful because it combined a boy who fought hard to buy the car of his fallen father and a stranger who was determined to make that a reality.

9 thoughts on “Colorado Teen Outbid In Effort To Buy Late Father’s Patrol Car, Then . . .”

  1. Moving story. Getting that kid his dad’s car, while donating a large amount of money to police widows and orphans at the same time – great testament to humanity.

    And thanks for the positive cop story, Professor Turley. 🙂

  2. A wonderful act of selflessness and generosity.

    Thanks for sharing the story professor.

  3. “With all of the lousy stuff going on around the world from ISIS killing prisoners to companies clear cutting the Amazon, there are occasionally a glimpse into the potential of humankind.”

    I thought we all (in academia) cared about truth and honesty. You mention no state action in the “lousy” stuff going on in the world…. Hmmmm wonder why…

  4. This is a wonderful story. Humans can be a powerfully good as they can be powerfully bad. May the good ones be more plentiful.

  5. Really nice story. Kudos to you Mr. Wells. And while all can likely appreciate the meaning for the son/family, those who have lost a close family member decades earlier then expected might be especially moved. I know I was.

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