Report: 80 Percent of China’s Northeast Now Unsafe For Drinking

130px-Mao_Zedong_portraitWe have been following the environmental meltdown in China from lethal levels of air pollution to “cancer villages” from industrial waste. The latest report comes from the water ministry and, while some are questioning whether there is full disclosure of water contamination, the official position is shocking enough. According to the report, more than 80% of rural wells in China’s north-east contain water unsafe for drinking. It is the safety of water in urban areas that is being questioned but the government insists that the water is fine.

The report shows that most of the samples drawn from over 2,000 shallow underground wells in the north and east in 2015 were of poor quality. More than 30% were of Grade IV quality — suitable only for industrial and agricultural use. Half of the water was rated as Grade V, which is water unfit for human consumption of any type.

The report adds fuel to the debate over the safety of Chinese agricultural products. It is not only crops however. We have been struggling for over a decade with the drywall disaster after China dumped low cost dry wall in the United States. It turned out that the dry wall was contaminated by water and other elements saturated with human and industrial waste. The pollutants would destroy the lining of electrical wires and even pipes inside of the walls. The result is one of the largest tort cases in history with tens of thousands of homes needing to be effectively gutted.

Source: BBC

10 thoughts on “Report: 80 Percent of China’s Northeast Now Unsafe For Drinking

  1. Potable water is uncommon in third world countries. I lived in Brazil for two years and drinking water that wasn’t thoroughly purified was dangerous. It wasn’t regional issue, it was throughout the entire country. I’m not criticizing. I just perplexed that this is a revelation.

  2. mostlymarie, I spent some time in Colombia and it’s he same. Our adopted son had giardia that was found when we got him home from Medellin.

  3. Report: 80 Percent of China’s Northeast Now Unsafe For Drinking

    To paraphrase John Adams why go aboard in search of monsters to slay. You can wish freedom on all and remain champion and vindicator here at home.

    The US is one giant Superfund site.

    Please click the link below and search for the Superfund site nearest your home.

    https://www.epa.gov/superfund/search-superfund-sites-where-you-live

    The US is also one giant Brownfield. Most people know what a Superfund site is but what is a Brownfield?

    EPA’s definition:

    A brownfield is a property, the expansion, redevelopment, or reuse of which may be complicated by the presence or potential presence of a hazardous substance, pollutant, or contaminant. It is estimated that there are more than 450,000 brownfields in the U.S. Cleaning up and reinvesting in these properties increases local tax bases, facilitates job growth, utilizes existing infrastructure, takes development pressures off of undeveloped, open land, and both improves and protects the environment.

    Please click the link below and search for the nearest Brownfield nearest your home.

    https://www.epa.gov/brownfields

  4. Um sounds more and more like the US to me. Corporations and the Kochs won’t be happy until no one has potable water unless of course you are a Koch or similar.

  5. “This is clearly the fault of liberals, gays and Obama.”

    “More lefty enviro-terrorists lies.”

    “Free-market conservatives understand that clean drinking water should be distributed to those God loves and has blessed with lots of money.”

  6. China is now, by most measures, the largest economy in the world. That means that “Third World” isn’t a really useful term for discussions of current conditions in China.

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