Enough About Ryan Lochte . . . Meet Piotr Malachowski

14089233_1065370773558627_7143975296149248463_n13925275_1059140470848324_7170938614047840697_nWe continue to be served a steady diet of Ryan Lochte stories from his being dropped by sponsors to continued investigations. Given his long history of immature conduct and comments, the exhaustive media attention for Lochte may be much to do about nothing. A far more worthy subject is Polish Olympian Piotr Malachowski who is auctioning silver medal for boy with rare cancer. Malachowski has shown the true character of a Olympian.

A Polish discus thrower, Malachowski is seeking to raise money to help 3-year-old Olek Szymanski, who has retinoblastoma, an eye cancer affecting young children. Olek must go to New York. He is quoted as saying “Winning an Olympic medal is one of an athlete’s life dreams. Of course, the most precious is gold. I did everything in my power to get it. Unfortunately this time I did not succeed. However, fate gave me a chance to increase the value of my ‘silver.’”

The Polish foundation called Siepomaga has already gathered about a third of the roughly 480,000 zlotys ($126,000). The highest bid in the auction for Malachowski’s silvermedal on Poland’s Allegro website is about $20,000.

Why talk about some spoiled brat like Lochte when there is a man of the quality of Malachowski to discuss.

10 thoughts on “Enough About Ryan Lochte . . . Meet Piotr Malachowski

  1. re: “Why talk about some spoiled brat like Lochte when there is a man of the quality of Malachowski to discuss.”

    Because it serves as diversion from real issues.

    • Because it serves as diversion from real issues.

      No, because Lochte is a manifestation of an archetype despised by the sort of people who write ‘news’ stories, so they write ’em to gloat. (Lochte is not despised by the women who’ve been pleased to be notches in his belt).

  2. This is a lovely and generous offer from this young man. It is in the best spirit of the Olympics. I went to the LA Olympics and the crowds were very friendly, we all cheered for all the athletes. I got to sit near Princess Margaret at a water jump on the cross-country. She spent her time as an expert commentator for us. A doctor who had taken his patients to the cross-country had too much food for the lunch so he invited my wife and me to eat with them. Which we did. It would have been rude to refuse.

    There is a true Olympic spirit at the Olympic games. You just do not see it on TV.

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