Report: 4 Out Of 5 Oklahoma City Kids Cannot Tell Time

440px-BahnhofsuhrZuerich_RZIn the latest indictment of our educational system, a new study has found that only 1 out of five kids in Oklahoma City can tell time on an analog clock.  These kids rely on iPhone and other devices with numerical readouts of the time.

Notably, only 1-in-10 Oklahoma City kids ages 6-12 even own a watch.   I have noticed this trend with my own kids.  My oldest boy told me recently that none of his friends carry watches.  They all use their iPhones.

 

Of course, they still need to be able to read a clock to fully function in our society.  It is a chilling thought that these kids can reach age 12 without learning such a basic skill.

50 thoughts on “Report: 4 Out Of 5 Oklahoma City Kids Cannot Tell Time

  1. It’s not so bad about not being able to read an analog clock, its the lack of understanding the concept of how long 10 minutes is that’s tragic.

  2. Remember–Obama, not Trump, was in office for the past eight years. Yep. That’s right. Eight years. If TODAY, as I right this, the kids in Oklahoma, who have been in school eight years or less, are incapable of reading a clock–a skill that has always been taught in the schools–then it is simply one more failure to pin on Obama. That’s right, folks. Eight years to get this right. Eight years to right a very simple and mundane wrong. This happened on Obama’s watch, not Trump’s. Yeah. I know. Sorry about the pun.

  3. Who cares? Technology has moved far past wristwatches and wall clocks. There are far more important things for them to learn than this.

    • Who cares????????. If they can’t learn to tell time, how do you expect them to learn science, math, etc.? Don’t think this inability is new and probably explains why so many employers look to foreign countries to fill critical positions.

  4. TheEx is absolutely correct. It’s the resp of parents, not teachers. Sad, really, that JT pins this on the school system. Makes me wonder what else he thinks should be taught in school instead of at home. Handwashing? Tying shoes? Making the bed? Look both ways …?

    Seriously, how many more life-lessons should we outsource to the school system?

    • When I was in the early grades in elementary school, we practice telling time, making change, what to do in a tornado and other life-lessons. For those who had learned at home, it was a reinforcement and a chance to practice. For those whose parents had not taught them or for those who had difficulties learning, it was an opportunity to learn from an actual teacher.

  5. Reading a clock was part of our first grade math class. Pictures of clocks in the workbook, requiring us to write in the correct time. We were also each required to purchase a small cardboard clock with movable hands on which we practiced placing the hands at the correct time as directed. We then had to advance the hands by the amount told: 10 minutes, 15 minutes, 30 minutes, etc. I found these lessons pretty easy as I had already been taught to tell time by my parents, who expected us to check the clock and make sure we did things and went places on time.

  6. Well, telling time, and mathematics, and reading and writing are what’s really important. It’s making sure that the appropriate racial numbers in the public schools match up, and that nobody bullies the weird little queer kids. That’s what really important! Because people with knowledge, and who can think for themselves won’t grow up to be SJWs. And that the whole point of education, isn’t it??? That and keeping the teacher’s union fat and happy!

    Squeeky Fromm
    Girl Reporter

  7. That’s ridiculous. My son is 6 and he can read an analog clock. He got a watch for Christmas that had the hour and minute hands labeled, and the minutes labeled on the outside ring. He excitedly told us what time it was every 5 minutes. I taught him how to tell time last summer with a video from the library and a laminated clock. It’s easy to teach kids to tell time and parents can’t always assume the school is doing it.

  8. Hmm, the 4 out of 5 children are being educated in leftist propaganda-based schools and the parents of the 4 out of 5 children are graduates of leftist propaganda colleges and universities. Hmmmm, I wonder if there’s any correlation here.

  9. Maybe those so inclined to help the “public interest” were flying across the country and staying a five star hotels instead of actually trying to assist the public interest.

    I bet most of JT’s students couldn’t tell us many important things about the law btw…. (especially public interest law).

  10. Niece of a friend wanted to become an EMT. She did the class and took the test and was doing fine until she came to the last question. There was a map with an accident marked on it; the question: find a route to the nearest hospital. She freaked, she had spent her young life asking “Siri” for directions – she was totally map-illiterate.

    Technology is changing our skill set The most important skill of modern youth is keeping their batteries charged.

    • Anthony, technology is adding to our skill set, and, in that regard, it is changing it. Technology is NOT the reason the younger members of society are seemingly unable to use their brain to solve simple problems. We, as parents and teachers, have taken the easy way out. We seem to think technology can replace knowledge. Children are taught they have to practice the skills of a game before they play. (The old saying: “you have to learn how to block and tackle before you play the game” should apply to all of life. When shortcuts are taken, we all suffer.

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