Woman Sentenced To Five Years For False Rape Claim

_98395235_mediaitem98395234Rebecca Palmer, 26, has gone from scorn to “stir” in a false rape case.  The English woman had consensual sex with a twenty-two year old soldier based in Tidworth but he later “rejected her.”  She proceeded to develop an elaborate false record to accuse him of rape.  The police fortunately were able to find clues that the record was manufactured and arrested Palmer.  She is now looking at a five year sentence.

 

The soldier was arrested and held in jail until police determined the sex to be consensual and detailed Palmer’s “malicious campaign.” This included nasty messages to the soldier and his family.  According to prosecutors, Palmer “invented fake friend profiles and produced false correspondence hoping that these would be accepted as supportive evidence of her false claims”.

She was found guilty of four offenses of perverting the course of justice.  Palmer pleaded guilty to five offenses of malicious communications and three offenses of perverting the course of public justice.

Usually, the jail sentences in England are lower than the United States, but this sentence seems about right in my judgment for trying to destroy a man’s life.

 

What do you think?

90 thoughts on “Woman Sentenced To Five Years For False Rape Claim

  1. I don’t know the laws in this lady’s part of the world, but i think at a Minimum she should face the lowest penalty he would have got if convicted. If they have one she should all so have to be on their sexual preditor list.

  2. “According to prosecutors, Palmer “invented fake friend profiles and produced false correspondence hoping that these would be accepted as supportive evidence of her false claims”” It is frightening to think what could have happened to this soldier if Palmer had not made such easily provable mistakes. Even if they did not have enough evidence to prosecute, anything short of proving his innocence could have ruined his life. And these accusations tend to shadow someone’s reputation.

    False rape accusations do happen. They are a slap in the face of anyone who was really raped, and it casts doubt on true rape victims’ assertions.

    I believe that if you can prove beyond a reasonable doubt that someone lied about being raped, then their sentence should be the same as what her victim would have suffered if found guilty. The bar for this should be high, to prevent the punishment of any true victim who was merely unable to prove her case. But if someone really did lie, then this is the only just punishment.

    As far as the accusations of mental illness – someone who kills his wife out of insane jealousy is clearly not firing on all cylinders, but he is not excused of culpability unless he is so ill that he cannot understand what he did was wrong. That would apply to someone so handicapped that they would punch someone and then immediately forget it happened, like someone with Alzheimer’s. Tragically, a percentage of people with dementia do become violent, although most don’t. They are not responsible at all for their actions. Trying to cover her tracks and creating false evidence proves, to me at least, that she knew quite well she was doing wrong.

    People may have issues, such as a failure to learn empathy, that lead to crime. Maybe she had bad parents, no good examples growing up, maybe she was spoiled and always got what she wanted so this was a strong psychological shock to be rejected. Counseling is certainly a good idea, if it is desired and could lead to less recidivism. Anything that can make the convicted learn how to be law abiding contributing members of society can benefit. But it in no way excuses a crime or makes the perpetrator not responsible.

    These false rape stories outrage me. I’ve mentioned before that I visited a girl in the hospital who had been brutally raped. I couldn’t even recognize her. The head trauma gave her amnesia, so she could not remember who or how many or what they looked like or how she was kidnapped. She could walk right by them and have no idea who they were. That frightened her to death. How dare anyone lie to try to punish a man who rejected them, and claim the support that is due the true victims of this terrible crime.

  3. Give her this choice: 15 years hard labor or female castration. If she choses the former, castrate her anyway.

    She a violent rapist wanna be. Gotta nip it in the bud, get it?

    You don’t want this woman getting pregnant and having a male baby, now do you? Future Jack the Ripper roaming the streets slicing and dicing woman hater? Think about it.

  4. At the jury trial for rape, I could pick a jury which would state on voir dire that no male would want sex with that deviant looking itchBay in the photo.

  5. The most famous fake rape case occurred in Egypt.

    The Hebrew slave Joseph was head of Potiphar’s household. But Potiphar’s wife had other plans. Potiphar’s wife is furious at Joseph for resisting her attempts to seduce him, and falsely accuses him of attempted rape.

    Potiphar casts Joseph into prison, from where he later comes to the notice of Pharaoh through his ability to interpret the dreams of other prisoners.

  6. Incarceration is wholly appropriate. Not sure what the precise duration should be.

    The whole mess is another example, in case we needed one, of how wretched are the latter-day terms of interaction between men and women. This sort of thing isn’t for most young people, but about a quarter of the youth population conduct their business this way. This vitiates to a degree the sympathy one might have for the young man in question.

    • Counseling for what? She’s malevolent, and may remain so in her petty way for the rest of her life. The only thing to do is punish her so she’s deterred as far as the law can deter her from injuring others.

  7. a 5 minute beat down rather than 5 years of thearpy may straighten her up it’s women like her that can sow the seeds of doubt in the jury’s mind in a real rape case perhaps volunteering @ a rape crisis center should be imposed upon release, although it seems to be devoid of any empathy which sti

        • David Benson – oh Oracle of Delphi, what particular mental illness does she have? No one has mentioned a specific one yet. I know this is your area of expertise, so I am asking you.

            • David Benson – to be honest, we both know you have haven’t thought deeply since you left teaching and you rarely did it when you were teaching. And you certainly didn’t do any deep thinking up until the age of maybe 16, if you were a very advanced student and then it was spasmodic. Been there, done that.

              BTW, oh Oracle of Delphi, you have not decided which mental illness this woman has, or is that too deep for you. 😉

                • David Benson – I started thinking deeply earlier than that. However, we have similar backgrounds. 🙂 Now, oh Oracle of Delphi, what mental illness does this young woman have? I think she is a “bunny boiler” which is a movie reference, but you pick your illness of the week oh wise one. 🙂 Let’s get those little grey cells working, David.

            • Just the wisdom that comes from almost 77 years of learning to think deeply.

              You give absolutely zero evidence of any ‘deep’ thinking. Just a moderate talent for studied evasion.

            • That’s a clinical term for ‘impossible’. Clinical terms are useful for clinicians, not for normal people.

              • It is more than ‘impossible’. Self-mutilation quite often goes along with it, for example.
                She needs a *good* counsellor (they seem to be hard to come by since the BPD people I know seem to have trouble getting good ones).

                She also needs to sit in prison to smack some reality into her.

                • No, it is ‘impossible’. Counseling and talk therapies have one reliable result: the provider gets paid.

                  Jailing and corporal punishment are in the public interest. If she wishes to talk to a ‘counselor’, that’s her deal and her family’s.

            • Prairie Rose, You are one of the most insightful people here. I concur w/ your diagnosis. 5 years seems appropriate.

              Feminists have managed to criminalize consensual sex. When I worked in the KC prosecutors office almost 40 years ago, the rape victim was treated horribly. The pendulum has swung to a horribly dangerous level the other way. And, as much as how badly victims were treated 40 years ago, it is much more dangerous the way the pendulum has swung. To take away a persons freedom away is the worst thing a govt. can do.

              • So glad we are on the same page, Nick! And thank you for your kind words. Your observations about humanity and your wide experience always interests me. So many great stories! I cannot grant a diagnosis, but it sure looks like the shoe fits in this case.

        • There is not the slightest indication she’s addled by schizophrenia and even if she were, she needs to be held accountable. Most such people do not commit predatory crimes.

        • please,oh please dr benson give me the the truth, the ultimate answer what EXACTLY is your definitive diagnosis? & unless u have that sheepskin that allowsyou to add m.d. after ur nane ur just a layperson, another armchair pop psychologist another dr.phil!

      • i’m not a fan of fox or O’Reilly @ all but yeah, i have no sympathy 4 her @ all! like i said she can make it even harder for women who are raped so what’s da problem w/dat?

        • i only watch fox when i want to see w/a psychotic breakdown is like, just because i follow alternative (liberal,progressive, whatever you want to call it) news does’t make me a bleeding heart apologist for her!

  8. Hardly surprising given the incessant political drumbeat that women are all long-suffering, silent victims of some vast male conspiracy. So trite, and so useful to the young and pissed off! Time in an all-female prison environment will disabuse her of the whole “women are inherently virtuous” thing.

  9. mentally ill? my a** i think sometimes we think just because i wouldn’t do that, that person must be mentally ill does she issues?, absolutely! is she mentally ill? no way! she’s just an extremely po’ed woman who used the internet to try to destroy this mans life see how far this attitude get

  10. Here’s an interesting false rape case in NYC. ABC weather anchor Hiedi Jones accuses a Hispanic man of raping her in Central Park. NYC Police Commissioner, Raymond Kelly said the man didn’t exist & therefore the rape never happened.

    Conclusion: Rape is considered a felony; a false accusation is considered a misdemeanor. You call that justice?

  11. Why do some assume she was mentally ill vice an evil, vindictive witch? Woman can be evil just as men can be. Stop trying to rationalize evil.

  12. On the surface she definitely deserves more than 5 years–except it doesn’t compute because she’s obviously nuts. Based on the andecdotal evidence I’m aware of a very high percentage of women who falsely claim to have been raped are mentally ill. The false allegation is a terrible crime; even if the man is never convicted of anything he’ll live in the shadow of the false rape claim forever. But I don’t know if locking up crazy women accomplishes anything.

    • Deterrence is probably the main reason. There is also the notion that some people are just bad, not necessarily mentally ill.

    • On the surface she definitely deserves more than 5 years–except it doesn’t compute because she’s obviously nuts

      There is no indication she’s ‘nuts’ at all. She was quite calculating and deliberative in doing this.

    • Getting her helped would be only one of several different objectives to sentencing. One is punishment/deterrence from committing future crimes, another would be protection of the public.

    • She will have five years in which to seek free counseling. A sex crime allegation can destroy a man’s life. It is possible that this man is forever on a sex offenders list and may be limited in his ability to seek certain types of employment when his service is completed.
      I think the sentence for false rape accusations should be the same as for a rape conviction. I also note that finding the accused not guilty, is not enough to substantiate a false accusation charge.

      • Given the current state of the NHS I doubt that mental health counseling is readily available to those in prison. Certainly is not in the USA.

        • David Benson – there are many GOOGLE hits for “prison counselor.” I have provide 2. Prisoners receive more mental health support than the homeless, and certainly more than the average American struggling to make ends meet. No one follows the average American around, inquiring if they need someone to talk to, for free, or counseling on how to navigate the complexities of life, make vocational choices, or any other pressing need.

          http://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug03/helping.aspx

          “Morgan saw that need first-hand during his first full-time jobs at the El Dorado and Winfield correctional facilities in Kansas. In both jobs he provided basic mental health services–not to be confused with services aiming to reduce recidivism. For example, some inmates need help coping with the length of their incarceration, dealing with being separated from loved ones and friends or accepting that the prison is going to be their home for a period of time–or forever. Others need to be taught how to live and survive in the prison environment. For example, Morgan worked with a 17-year-old inmate who began receiving sexual pressure early in his incarceration.
          “I worked with him to adjust his physical appearance to look older, taught him basic prison safety, and then counseled him about the institution’s unwritten inmate rules,” Morgan says. “When we terminated our work, he had successfully adjusted to the environment and was no longer experiencing sexual pressure.”
          Attending to inmates’ basic mental health needs also helps with prison safety, Morgan says. Take a prisoner who has been placed in “lockdown” or segregation for 23 hours a day in maximum security for threatening other inmates or guards. If he begins to show signs of psychosis or depression due to being isolated, Morgan says it’s in everyone’s best interest to give him “crisis intervention”–involving, for example, a “no-harm” contract in which an inmate and a therapist agree verbally or in writing that the inmate will not harm himself for a designated period, or until at least one therapy session is held. Providing such services can be a challenge, he notes, because of limited resources, an environment that limits social support and the inmates’ confinement to a small space.
          Indeed, crisis intervention in prisons sometimes requires nontraditional methods. For example, inmates in segregation don’t have access to radios, televisions or other entertainment. So Morgan and colleagues at one prison developed a “recreational behavioral contingency program” that allowed inmates to receive puzzle books for good behavior. “This helped mentally ill inmates have something to focus on and placated inmates with behavioral problems,” Morgan says.”

          http://work.chron.com/prison-counselor-do-21972.html

          “Prison counselors are criminal justice and mental health professionals who play important roles in the correctional system. They help rehabilitate inmates during their stay in prison and prepare them to reintegrate into the real world once they are released. Prison counselors usually have at least a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice or a mental health-related field like social work or psychology.”

          “The main goal of a prison counselor is to provide guidance to inmates when they first enter prison and throughout the duration of their sentence. The first way they accomplish this is by performing assessments on new inmates. Assessments are used to help determine an appropriate course of treatment, such as whether prisoners require substance abuse counseling, and to establish behavioral goals. Counselors gather biopsychosocial information, meaning pertinent biological, psychological and social details, for use in compiling a comprehensive case history. In some cases, counselors may interview a prisoner’s family members or significant other to obtain additional information. The case history is provided to psychiatrists and other medical staff for use in their evaluation of the inmate.

          Education and Counseling
          Prison counselors also provide education and individual and group counseling to inmates. They teach new prisoners about the rules of the facility and help them adjust to life behind bars. Prison counselors offer vocational, academic, social and personal counseling to help prisoners develop new skills and cultivate insight to prevent recidivism. Counselors might provide individual counseling on issues such as depression, stress or substance abuse. They also often lead counseling and educational groups in areas like problem solving, anger issues and stress management. They may occasionally intervene in crises.”

    • David Benson – clearly you have never made the mistake of dating a “bunny boiler”. And evil is not mentally ill, she will get counseling, but it will not take. When she gets out, she will still be a “bunny boiler’ with a record.

      She deserves as much time in prison as he would get for raping her.

      • Many mistakes. Start with providing some reason to believe she will obtain any mental health counseling whatsoever.

      • Oh, yes, they do exist, and they are scary as hell. I knew someone who broke up with a woman, who threatened to throw herself through a window and claim he did it. She had a reputation for being violent and unstable. He was scared to death she was going to do something to herself, and blame him, and he tried to always be with someone else so he’d have an alibi 24/7.

        Sometimes I think men and women should do a background check, and interview friends, family, and enemies before going on a first date. There are scary people out there.

    • I cannot imagine your family does not treat you with mildly amused condescension. Unless, of course, they’re equally fatuous.

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