16,000 and Counting: Chinese Continue To Pull Out Dead Pigs From River Used By Shanghai Residents

Flag_of_the_People's_Republic_of_ChinaWe previously discussed how the number of dead pigs in Chinese rivers leading to Shanghai has increased from a few hundred to just under 1000. The number is now 16,000 and counting. Yet, Chinese officials insist they have no idea who dumped over 16,000 pigs into the water but that the rivers, used for drinking water, is completely safe.

Officials have now pulled 10,570 carcasses from the Huangpu river and 5,528 pigs from upstream tributaries in the Jiaxing area of Zhejiang province.

Many of the pigs were found to be diseased and Chinese officials have been trying to stop Chinese farmers from selling diseased animals for food — a widespread problem in China where food controls are spotty at best. Just last november, three men were sentenced for slaughtering 77,000 diseased pigs that were then sold for food in China.

It seems pretty hard for dump over 16,000 pigs into rivers without someone, particularly the large Chinese government apparatus, from noticing. Yet, it remains a mystery.

Years ago, I spoke in China to argue for the use of private attorneys general to combat environmental problems as the only way to deal with the rapidly diminishing environmental condition in the country. While the paper was published in China, it clearly is not something that the Chinese government is willing to allow at this time. To the contrary, environmentalists continue to be beaten and imprisoned in the country.

Source: Guardian

19 thoughts on “16,000 and Counting: Chinese Continue To Pull Out Dead Pigs From River Used By Shanghai Residents

  1. “Just last november, three men were sentenced for slaughtering 77,000 deceased pigs that were then sold for food in China.”

    I’m assuming you meant “diseased” rather than “deceased” as it would be rather difficult to slaughter deceased pigs.

    It’s a disturbing mystery, for sure. I think I’d be avoiding pork in their markets right now, if I lived there.

  2. Incidents like this should alarm everyone. Globally. We have plagues in our collective history. Forget not. And the careless mixing of animal and man (who is an animal) only elevates that risk, which could indifferently explode without warning, in the opposing direction of life in the Cambrian.

    To quote Carlin: We’re circling the drain.

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  4. What are the pigs diseased from? Is it a flu virus?

    Representatives from the CDC called my house several times a few months ago wanting to know how many children resided in the household for vaccination purposes. They called several times because I didn’t answer the phone.

  5. if this keeps up soon the elusive chinese river pig will be extinct. to help keep this catastrophe from happening please sent your cash donations to:

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  6. It may end up that the Chinese economic miracle they have created will end up killing them. Capitalism unchecked is identical to raw greed. Without a power equal to that of the owners they will do what they want and destroy the system that made them. We are doing that here in America, more slowly because we do still have some remnants of government oversight. But, as the government comes more and more under the control of the Masters of the Universe, we become more like the oligarchy of China.

  7. Frankly, I agree that we are regressing. Back in the day there were a couple of rivers that would burn. It was the publicity from one such flaming river (that took quite a while to put out) that kicked the demands for a clean water act into high gear. I recall reading, at about the same time, that there were rivers so toxic that short time exposure would kill you. I recall one headline to the effect ‘8 year old boy dies after swimming in….’. he went to a nearby river with his dad and I believe his brother and he was fatally poisoned by the river water. Lake Erie was declared “dead” in the 60’s. Things can change though.

    I have read a few reports about protests in China for various issues including environmental problems; a couple of protests were rowdy to the point of violence. China isn’t alone in being a bad actor regarding trading the environment for prosperity either.

    I am very disappointed in the way we have moved backward in our treatment of the environment. The gains of the 70’s and early 80’s have been degraded and new regulation- effective regulation of new industries and industry methods has been slight to non-existent. Old industries are being allowed to backslide and the neo-cons call for abolition of the EPA. It’s a sad and corrupt state of affairs but it changed once for the better in my lifetime so I hold out some hope that it can do so again though that goes against my normally cynical grain.

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