Déjà Vu: Michigan Man Arrested For Passing Counterfeiting $100 Bill To Stripper

UnknownThis glum fellow is Stephen Gidcumb who has been arrested for counterfeiting. What is interesting about the case is that Gidcumb used his personal computer to generate the $100 bill and the counterfeiting was discovered by a strip joint. Indeed, Gidcumb appears to have returned to the club not long after passing on the fake bill. Not surprisingly, the club is named Déjà Vu.

Unknown-1Gibcumb allegedly included fake bills with real ones to play for a personal stripper in a club in Kochville Township. The club identified the fake bills and was on a watch for Gibcumb. They did not have to wait long. Gibcumb returned to the Déjà Vu club and was arrested. More fake bills were found at this house.

In granting bail, the judge told Gibcumb to “Stay out of Déjà Vu.” Otherwise, as Yogi Berra, it would be a criminal matter of “Déjà Vu all over again.”

10 thoughts on “Déjà Vu: Michigan Man Arrested For Passing Counterfeiting $100 Bill To Stripper

  1. One “passes” a “counterfeit bill”– no “ing”. The guy’s last name is fake. So is his hair. He was manic- depressive and recently released from a mental hospital because he would not pay and had no insurance. On a “high note” he discovered a “method”. His illness is described on the DSM5. He has a legal defense to counterfeiting. He has a legal defense team coming in called Feiting Without Borders.

  2. I heard Givecome asked if he could go home to get the bail, he said he left enough bail money on his computer printer to pay the full amount of bail.
    The court said no.

    A great Memorial Day to all my brothers on the blog. To those of you who went to Canada, well you know what you can do!

  3. I don’t know the elements of the offense, but I assume that one element would be that the person who passed the counterfeit bill intended that it be regarded as real, and that he receive something of value in return. I think that those elements would be difficult to prove. He could argue that it was intended as a joke, and that there was no exchange of value.

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