This Dwarf May Kill You

Looking for something else to worry about, consider T Pyxidis . . . it may be the end to all of us.

Astronomers at Villanova University believe T Pyxidis is really two stars with one being a white dwarf that is sucking in gas and steadily growing. It will eventually explode and possibly end life on this planet. It is simply not known when. I am personally waiting on finishing my grading of the finals in anticipation that T Pyxidis will supply the ultimate curve.

For the full story, click here.

97 thoughts on “This Dwarf May Kill You”

  1. “Low humor. I do low humor.”

    Well I’m a lowbrow so that should work out nicely.

  2. ThirtyPercenter:
    “No, I was referencing Beetlejuice. I do recall in Candyman the “say it three times” deal but with Beetlejuice you didn’t need the mirror.”

    ———
    I was just playing off the name repetition required to invoke an entity, Beetlejuice, alluded to in your posting (which was a nice play on words BTW) by expanding it to another well known movie character/villain, Candyman. I was invoking his name the requisite (5 times required I thought w/Candyman) number of times in a ‘mirror’ as required by the plot and left the result of the invocation to ones imagination by ending the post mid-sentence. Low humor. I do low humor.

  3. “I would like to know where all the neutrinos proceed to and what happens when they get there.”

    We get a wave of neutrinos. They’re the first thing to arrive. If a star explodes the neutrino observatories will find out first. Trillions of them from the sun pass through your body every second without doing anything, but during a supernova ten times as many pass through your body without doing anything. When supernova 1987A exploded, neutrino observatories around the world caught a burst of five or ten neutrinos all within one or two minutes (I forget). Usually they catch one from the sun only every few minutes. That confirmed it was a supernova.

  4. Clovis/Wayne:

    good to see you back. Where have you been? Molesting little boys behind the alter?

  5. “LOL! At first I thought that was Candyman you were referencing, that was Candyman in the movie, right? Yes, I believe it was Candyman,; anybody remember that movie Candyman?”

    No, I was referencing Beetlejuice. I do recall in Candyman the “say it three times” deal but with Beetlejuice you didn’t need the mirror.

    Beetlejuice Beetlejuice Beetlejuice.

  6. “You guys,

    The “589 years ago” explosion was right on. We’re seeing the star as it was 600 years ago (it suddenly shrank 20% about 615 years ago”

    I’m fairly confident there isn’t anyone here who is unaware of the time factor in viewing the light from distant stars, given its a concept most people learn by middle school. The fact is there are ways to determine an event without actually witnessing it via a telescope, that would give us more warning than 600 years. Not much more, but some.

    Personally my own unprofessional opinion having mused on the matter somewhat, is that the greatest threat to our planet in the near future, cosmically speaking that is, would be the threat of a large object hitting our moon and offsetting its orbit. While the earth has defenses against objects from space, and is sufficiently large enough to survive a moderate impact, should the moon be damaged somehow by some large stellar object (it’d have to be pretty big considering the moons been pounded for eons with little to no effect) then we’d all be looking for that shuttle off Caprica.

  7. Bdaman, be careful when handling “Myron”, he has a notorious past history of ripping off bloggers pseudonyms and posting as them. This is all in his vain and tragic attempt to make the “regulars on this blog esteem him all the more. He is very lonely and in need of much validation. You have been warned!

  8. Maverattick;

    I would like to know where all the neutrinos proceed to and what happens when they get there.

    Thanks for sharing your expertise.

  9. “What are the chilliest 12 inches in the world?”

    Methinks you exaggerate. It may be chilly, but it surely ain’t 12 inches.

  10. BTW, I should clarify: I’m assuming (since we know we’re not in danger of the gamma ray radiation) some as of yet unobserved effect of type II supernovas. So basically I’m just asking for people to make cool sounding stuff up.

  11. ThirtyPercenter
    “It’s really stupid that everyone is yelling and screaming about T Pyxidis: Betelgeuse…”

    As long as we don’t say its name three times.

    Then it could be here right away.

    LOL! At first I thought that was Candyman you were referencing, that was Candyman in the movie, right? Yes, I believe it was Candyman,; anybody remember that movie Candyman? You can probably rent Candyman on DVD if … you know, you can see your reflection in your in your moniter if you …

  12. You guys,

    The “589 years ago” explosion was right on. We’re seeing the star as it was 600 years ago (it suddenly shrank 20% about 615 years ago).

    We have no idea if the star actually exploded already. If it did, we’re going to get hit in 2021 by a spherical wavefront that’s already 1178 light years wide and only 11 light years away now.

    It would just be bright, that’s all- pretty cool actually. You’d be able to read at night by starlight, like the Chinese could with the Crab Nebula in 1054. (People in Europe didn’t seem to notice.)

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