It’s Over, Over There: World War I Ends With The Payment of Final Reparations By Germany

Germany is finally in the black. On Sunday, Germany paid off the last of the reparations set 92 years ago after the end of World War I. The final £60 million installment of the £22 billion debt was paid off pursuant to the 1919 Treaty of Versailles.

The bill was originally 226 billion Reichsmarks, but was later reduced to 132 billion — or what was calculated to be the equivalent of £22 billion at the time. Ten million died as a result of the war.

Now, the world can focus on reparations for releasing the devastation of liverwurst on the world.

Source: Yahoo

Jonathan Turley

12 thoughts on “It’s Over, Over There: World War I Ends With The Payment of Final Reparations By Germany”

  1. It’s not over; we still have yet to withdraw all our troops from Germany! Oh when will Wilson’s foolish war be completed? <- silliness

  2. Anyone wishing to get a bit more insight into this should pop over to the BBC News website – that’s the UK front page rather than any international edition. They are running a piece today on exactly why it took so long.
    Basically, Wall Street Crash, Hitler, waiting for East and West (just how much does each owe?) to re-unify so payments can re-commence.

  3. Maaarrghk!
    1, October 1, 2010 at 12:53 pm
    I think we only finished paying off our own war debt (WW2) to you guys about 5 years ago.

    I guess we try to all get along in the UK and rest of Europe because when there is war it is always local to all parts of the population. Everyone is badly affected because all live in the killing zone rather than an ocean away.

    Also, we and the Germans have always had a respect for bravery in an enemy.

    Of course, this behavoir of all us Europeans getting along after the end of the fighting and Americans not understanding is not new.

    After the battle of Yorktown, British and French officers sat down and ate together. As our officers had spent quite a while under siege they were a bit strapped for cash. The Frenchies did not need to be asked to loan us a few bob to avoid embarrasment. The Americans were mightily puzzled by all this.

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    There is useful insight offered in your post and some interesting history.

  4. I think we only finished paying off our own war debt (WW2) to you guys about 5 years ago.

    I guess we try to all get along in the UK and rest of Europe because when there is war it is always local to all parts of the population. Everyone is badly affected because all live in the killing zone rather than an ocean away.

    Also, we and the Germans have always had a respect for bravery in an enemy.

    Of course, this behavoir of all us Europeans getting along after the end of the fighting and Americans not understanding is not new.

    After the battle of Yorktown, British and French officers sat down and ate together. As our officers had spent quite a while under siege they were a bit strapped for cash. The Frenchies did not need to be asked to loan us a few bob to avoid embarrasment. The Americans were mightily puzzled by all this.

  5. In response to the first comment about the lack of animosity seen in the Brits at the Ryder’s cup…. I lived in Denmark for years, which was an occupied country in WW II and I never heard any snide or angry remarks about the Germans. There is much more acceptance of actions in the past than we would feel in America. They have a long history of surviving together.

  6. I thought liverwurst was the reason they reduced the debt from 226 billion to 132 billion? Seems perfectly logical that that recipe would be worth 94 billion.

    Tom

  7. WOW!!

    I watched a bit of the Ryder Cup this morning as the tournament opned in very heavy rain in Wales. Given all the history between Britain and Germany, I was struck by the huge cheer the Brits gave to German Martin Kaymer as he prepared to tee off. They did the same for Bernhard Langer during his heyday in the 80’s. Good show.

  8. Ah ha, but never forget that we have that wonderful coat and now brand label to wear….Burberry

    “The trench coat was developed as an alternative to the heavy serge greatcoats worn by British and French soldiers in the First World War.”

    Damn and can I get a loan for that long and renegotiate, commence another war and then pay if off 92 years later….?

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