English Couple Killed in Pakistan in Honor Killing After Daughter Backs Out of Arranged Marriage

We have been following honor killing in the United States and aboard. This tragedy has a different aspect however. Gul Wazir, a taxi driver from Birmingham and his wife Begum were killed in Pakistan after reportedly returning to make amends for their daughter breaking off an arranged marriage.


The couple decided that, out of respect, they would return to the village to explain her daughters decision. The man was not happy after the marriage had been promised. He reportedly proceeded to kill them both out of “honor.”

Such killings are supposedly common in the Muslim area of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Source: Telegraph

58 thoughts on “English Couple Killed in Pakistan in Honor Killing After Daughter Backs Out of Arranged Marriage”

  1. ShireNomad–I don’t consider abortion to be murder any more than I consider a woman’s inability to conceive or a man’s inability to fertilize his wife’s egg as murder. These are my moral standards so I have nothing to condemn. I also don’t consider abortion as an acceptable form of birth control except in areas where the so-called “Christians” have blocked the teaching of sex education in their public schools and blocked the distribution of contraceptives in their communities.

  2. I have not heard of the other game. So into making the grandkids become counter-intelligence couriers..

  3. Anonymously Yours
    1, August 9, 2010 at 3:34 pm
    ShireNomad,

    You are sly and caught a hen roosting and roasted it….that was tasty…remind me never to play chess with you….or even the Game Diplomacy….renews the WWI experience…an actual board game..

    ============================================================

    I like the “bookcase” game, Down With The KIng. I can hire grandkids to go spy on players in other alliances.

  4. ShireNomad,

    You are sly and caught a hen roosting and roasted it….that was tasty…remind me never to play chess with you….or even the Game Diplomacy….renews the WWI experience…an actual board game..

  5. In a perfect world there would be no unwanted babies, no rape, no incest, and no badly deformed or damaged fetuses. Sadly, we don’t live in that world. The decision belongs to the woman- not to the legislature, the voters, the clergy, or the town busybodies.

    Okay, so in that instance, you do not believe we should condemn murder that is justified based on cultural beliefs, and failing to condemn it does not leave you with no moral standards. Just checking.

  6. ShireNomad– If by “pro-life” you refer to abortion, I am “pro-choice” and reject the term “pro-life”. In a perfect world there would be no unwanted babies, no rape, no incest, and no badly deformed or damaged fetuses. Sadly, we don’t live in that world. The decision belongs to the woman- not to the legislature, the voters, the clergy, or the town busybodies. In other areas I am “pro-life”. I am against capital punishment- too many innocent people have been executed. A life sentence is punishment enough-an execution can’t be reversed. I am against invading countries to boost the value of your stock portfolio and help your cronies in the oil industry while killing hundreds of thousands of innocent people in the process (are you listening, Dick Cheney?). I’m against invading Iraq for the purpose of Christianizing the Middle-East (are you listening, George W. Bush?). I’m against invading Iraq for the looney idea that you could hasten armageddon and then sit at God’s right hand and be his foreign policy advisor-again G.W.Bush.

  7. For those interested in philosophy and especially the article of “faith” within a philosophical stance, I highly recommend SIMON CRITCHLEY’s column in today’s NY Times Opinionator section.

    An excerpt:
    “Thus, paradoxically, non-Christian faith might be said to reveal the true nature of the faith that Christ sought to proclaim. Even — and indeed especially — those who are denominationally faithless can have an experience of faith. If faith needs to be underpinned by some sort of doctrinal security, then inwardness becomes externalized and the strenuous rigor of faith evaporates.”

    Note: Simon Critchley is an English philosopher currently teaching at The New School. He describes himself as a non-Christian and occasionally sports an ascot.

    Considering all the discussion we have involving the subject of religion, I thought his column might be thought provoking for some of the posters.

  8. HenMan,

    Where do you see that I agreed with what happened. I said put yourself in there shoe’s. I personally don’t kill chicken’s, goat’s or play with snakes…..

    Some people do…that it their choice….

    I don’t agree with killing either…I even went so far as to get up out of a meeting onetime to give a honey bee freedom…I went outside and He flew away…unlike Buddha killing spiders just because they bite you….well when a bee stings you its dead anyway…

    I am opposed to killing. I am opposed to animal sacrifice as well. Bread and wine is good enough for me…..

  9. AY– If you can’t condemn murder because it’s part of someone else’s “culture”, then you can no longer criticise anything, because you no longer have any moral standards of your own.

  10. Immigrate those two families to America and watch how they respond to our culture … I wonder how they would respond ….

  11. I will say that unless you have been exposed to a culture and its intricacies we are all just hyperbolic superlatives…..What would a good catholic do…well it depends on which part of the world you live in and facet of Catholicism you scribe to….What would a Jewish person do….same facts…..

    Why do Iraq’ men kill there daughters in the US when they turn to the culture norms of this society….It is based on religion and honor….it is not your way of thinking but there’s… Put yourself in there shoes….and contrary to popular belief the Dutch do not wear wooden shoes….

  12. Whether religion or culture, there certainly was a clash … the English couple were attempting to act in what they considered to be an honorable manner and they were met by what the spurned young man felt was honorable behavior. The outcome, for me, is illustrated by the last man standing. The honorable couple are dead … the honorable single man is alive … somewhere in that mix is a whole lot of dishonor.

  13. I’d agree that this is about culture and not religion. The great battle going in is really between modern society and tribal society. Religion just serves as a handy avatar.

    Sadly all societies have tribalists who would prefer we all live in a prescience dark ages. They usually are only a problem when they start believing some invisible cloud being has given them superior knowledge and superior morality so that they can enforce their beliefs on others. Despite all that they have in common in desired outcome they always first turn against those that believe in a different version of invisible cloud being.

    But ultimately its not the invisible cloud being thats the problem its the tribalists desire to drag society backwards thats the problem.

  14. That’s the Turkish flag, not the Pakistani flag that you have in this article. The Pakistani flag is green. I guess you were confused with all the Turkish items on your blog today.

  15. culheath,

    Oh, how I disagree. In that part of the world..Honor and Religion go hand in hand…if memory serves me correctly it like wheels on a bike. Unlike the US and other religions which take the Unicycle ride and separate and justify there actions and reactions based upon the acceptable religious views at the time….

  16. It has nothing to do with religious views…its about cultural traditions which in human rights terms I have every right to criticize as murder.

  17. And to each his own…I may not agree with it but, this practice has been around…say…even before I was born…who am I to impose by religious views, that this is wrong.

    The gentleman went knowing what the risks were…now why would he, if he did not respect honor?

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