A Simple Diet For A More Civilized Age

By Darren Smith, Weekend Contributor

foodI thought I would take a break from the legal discussions and move to something just as important–actually more so: the healthy diet.

Over the years I have come to appreciate this diet with its numerous aspects that can help not only your own well being, but it actually can contribute toward more sustainable agribusiness model.

I found that it is mostly a waste of money to subscribe to or purchase various diets that are mass marketed. This method I follow eliminates that requirement and the food actually tastes better in many ways.

So, I offer you another choice, and free of any program costs or subscriptions.


For the obligatory disclaimer, I am discussing the diet that I personally use. For each individual reader you might wish to consult with your doctor about diet and exercise.

Where to begin? Some of these tenets I understand will conjure in the mind of some political connotations they might not agree with. Personally, I think my health is more important than politics. It can have however benefits that help the individual just as much as the environment or other issues that have unfortunately become politicized.

The simple basics that I will discuss in more detail are as follows:

  1. Do not salt your food
  2. Buy organic food only
  3. Buy food directly from the source if at all possible. Eat what is harvested that week.
  4. Avoid processed or manufactured food
  5. Dine out rarely (cost and quality)
  6. Avoid refined sugar
  7. Drink only filtered water for hydration, and often
  8. Eat vegetables and Fruit as your main courses. You can consume as many vegetables as your appetite demands without much worry.
  9. Limit corn consumption to sparing levels after being freshly harvested
  10. Avoid grains
  11. Avoid dairy products
  12. Avoid red meat
  13. My primary source of protein is wild caught, US or Canadian salmon as well as other fishes and shellfish. I do not source any seafood harvested outside the United States or Canada.
  14. Eat rice sparingly
  15. Eat potatoes sparingly
  16. Eat egg whites from chickens raised in a healthy environment, egg yolks sparingly
  17. Use only olive oil in cooking and then sparingly
  18. Lastly, and this is very important, you should view a nutrition label as a Warning Label. Processed food will have a Warning Label. It is a good rule of thumb to help determine what is best not to eat. The presence of a warning label indicates a manufactured food. Of course there are some items such as the olive oil or the eggs that will have the warning label, but for this diet there are some exceptions that are not as easily avoided.

Buy Organic!

Organic foods are those, basically, that are grown without commercial pesticides or herbicides and are not Genetically Modified (GMO). Herbicides and Pesticides increase crop yields and when margins are growing smaller for farmers it is very tempting to resort to these. Their use is credited with reducing famines in many areas as well as bringing the promise of lower food costs to consumers. It comes at a price however. That cost is your health, the nutritional quality of food, and stress to the environment.

When you go organic, understand that your individual food costs will rise in the short term. There are two basic reasons for this. Consumers will pay more due cost push involving reduced crop yields per acre and demand pull where wholesales and retailers know that consumers will pay a premium for organic foods due to health consciousness and prior expectations. This however is not a complete cost as it can be offset by adopting other strategies that I will discuss among the other tenets.

As for GMO foods, corporate food giants claim GMO food is safe. I don’t agree with this position but taking them at their word they are nevertheless engineering plants to be in some incidences resistant to a scorched earth herbicide containing glyphosate, among other strategies. Glyphosate has been found in many studies to be carcinogenic and can possibly lead to neurological diseases. Why expose yourself to this and other dangerous chemicals? When running single crops continually and going through constant cycles of herbicide applications the soil becomes depleted of nutrients and requires increasing levels of fertilizer to achieve sufficient production levels per acre. Farm runoff from irrigation carries often high levels of fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides that have lead to environmental disturbances downstream. At the very least it causes food to become increasingly bland due to the absence of micronutrients and other traits of rich and health soil as a substrate.  Anecdotally, one year after returning from overseas (where organic farming was standard) after two weeks I called a friend of mine and asked him if he thought the food back in the US now tasted bland after we returned.  We were both in agreement.  I think we lost some of the flavor of foods when we went to large scale agribusiness models.

Another aspect that is a worry with GMO crops is that they have singular genetic identities. There is little if any diversity. This can lead to vulnerabilities. A case in point is the demise of the Gros Michel banana cultivar, a former mainstay within the fruit industry. Being essentially identical to its cloned namesakes divided through many countries, it became commercially extinct after the outbreak of Panama Disease destroyed almost the entire species throughout the world. It was replaced with a lower quality cultivar, the Cavendish, which took its place as the staple banana crop. The Cavendish requires artificial ripening. Now, there is worry that this too is vulnerable to another pandemic, Tropical Race 4. The planting of a wide variety of crops in many small, extended locations, can act as a hedge against extinctions.

Processed Food

Processed food truly is in my view one of the biggest risks to human health currently accepted by society. Not as dangerous as cigarette smoking obviously but it is as insidious in many ways.

Volumes of information can be written for why processed food is bad but I will attempt to provide a few ideas that should hopefully be convincing enough.

It might sound strange but processed food existed in a fraction of a percent of human existence. Formerly it was confined to preserving steps such as salting meat, pickling, and similar efforts mainly designed to preserve food due to lack of refrigeration and freezing technologies widespread enough to matter. We worked past this obstacle and nearly all of us in the Western World have these devices in our own homes. At that point we could have broken away from salted foods and our food in general would have been healthier over the course of the seasons than before. Instead we fell victim to our own need for further conveniences.

Processed food for our discussion does not only mean bacon, sausage, processed cheese, and lunch meat. Basically it means anything in a can, box, or bag that contains anything other than single ingredient foods. What I mean by this definition is a food that has been manufactured or altered from its natural state. Examples include peas in a sauce instead of just frozen peas, carrots with added sugar and salt, TV dinners, and even food with preservatives added. Basically this means everything within the center of the modern grocery store.

It truly astounds me how most Americans have become conditioned to purchase processed foods over whole foods. It seems my generation was the last in the country that remembers as a child when dinner consisted of an fresh green beans, mashed potatoes, a slice of bread, and rainbow trout (during fishing season). Now, for many it is Green Giant Vegetable BlendTMTater Tots(R),WonderTM Bread with “I can’t believe it’s not butter(R), and Gordon’s(R) Classic Crispy Battered Fish Filets.

There is so much wrong with the latter dinner. First, most canned foods, if not all, are GMO; worse they are often packed with preservatives and high amounts of salt or other forms of sodium. Excessive sodium intake is linked to pathologies such as hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Every one of the courses in the latter meal contains significant levels of salt. In the former, only the bread contains some added salt. The problem lies mostly with what I will refer to as Manufactured Foods.

A typical manufactured food consists of litany of chemical additives and often times are conglomerates consisting of other manufactured foods. Food scientists are employed to bring forth traits that marketers want to be accentuated or diminished according to requirements of the manufacturer. Some are to enhance flavor, color, shelf life, form factor, or reduce costs. This comes at the direct expense of food quality and nutrition. In fact, lower quality main ingredients (such as the fish) can be utilized because flavour enhancers will mask any taste deficiencies.

A run of the mill fish stick seems to be a cheaper source of fish than buying whole filets. But it is not the case most of the time. First the fish stick has a much smaller portion of fish per weight because the manufacturer adds cheap filler ingredients such as grains or corn. To make it more palatable salt is added. The fish will also often times be the cheapest kind the manufacturer can source. So per dollar you might actually pay more for fish sticks in terms of fish per pound than buying the same fish as a whole food. But the health costs are much worse.

Good fish consists of species such as salmon and halibut. Bad fish consists of bottom dwellers such as catfish and tuna which is known to have higher concentrations of mercury. Not that these fish are worse than a fish stick, just the nutritional value is lower. Catfish tends to be farm raised. If you eat salmon, wild caught, from the US or Canada, you get a litany of benefits. Fish sticks give you salt, grease, fattening breading, and at one time Trans Fats, which overrides any benefit the fish provides. And, you are more likely to have fish that comes from countries having questionable food practices. In fact, you have to be careful about some of the origins of your foods.

We have discussed in detail on this blog of the various outrages caused by horrific scandals in China with food brought into our country. Frankly speaking I do not trust anything that comes from there with regard to food. But, if you choose to avoid this by purchasing food that comes only from America you will be given a shock when you find out that a label that claims it is made in the US is sometimes actually substantially from China or other countries. For example, the shrimp might come from Thailand as a frozen package but once it is cooked in Ogden, Utah and sold by a grocer it becomes a product of the US. With manufactured food, especially from corporate food makers, it is going to be especially difficult to determine where the food came from when it contains conglomerations of other manufactured foods from who knows where.

One thing that needs to be understood about manufactured food. It is designed and engineered to appeal to the human physiology in ways to keep people motivated to buy more of their products. It sounds conspiracy like, but it actually is true.

The human species has evolved to have yearnings for certain traits of plants and animals as food. We naturally like the taste of fat, salt, and sweet items. We also receive pleasure from wide varieties of flavor as well as eating certain types of food and the resulting physiological processes they generate. Taking the sweet craving in terms of how we existed thousands of years ago we are motivated to eat berries and fruits when in season because the aroma of ripe fruit attracts us to eat these because our bodies use the nutrition of these plants. We are rewarded with a pleasant tasting meal. We can eat mangoes for weeks and not become four hundred pound couch potatoes because the season will change and they become unavailable. We then moved on toward other crops or meats changing with the season. We might have had a greater craving for fats and sought those out just before the onset of winter when food became more scarce, which in turn we stored out fat reserves to help us through the cold. Of course, different parts of the word have differing climates and hence different adaptations to what we ate. In the end, over time we ate a more balanced diet based upon our needs and environment.

Manufactured food on the other hand short-circuits how we are wired with regard to food. Sugary foods are craved by most people. Refined sugar is unlike what you will find in nature. The human body processes refined sugar much more efficiently into the blood stream and it, for lack of better words, is the crack cocaine of the sugar world. It is ubiquitous in manufactured food and contributes much to obesity, diabetes, and other ailments due to constant consumption through out the year, as opposed to just seasonally.

In addition, where food manufactures are marketing “low fat” foods they often substitute the fat with sugar. The caloric value of the food product might actually be of little difference. Also, eating sugary foods can lead to spikes and valleys of energy which can be detrimental to internal organs. It increases the amount of calories taken in by food if the sugars are replacing proteins and natural sugars occurring in fruit which take longer to absorb. The addition of fat into manufactured food increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. So why is it in there? It is because people have been conditioned into craving it and the food manufacturers recognize this.

Trans Fats, which are about to be effectively banned from food in the United States, explains very well what has gone wrong with food as a whole in the United States.

Trans fat does not exist in nature, it is created by man. They are created by taking an vegetable oil that is a liquid at room temperature, heating it to a certain temperature and under specific pressures, then adding hydrogen gas. The result is a fat that is stable and mostly solid at room temperature. A benefit this provides food scientists is extended shelf life and removes the need for cooling to keep the manufactured food stable along with adding differing form factors. By adding a trans fat the cost of selling the food is lowered and various other flavorings are possible.

This was an enormous boon for the food manufacturing industry, lasting decades. Unfortunately, it was very unhealthy as the medical community discovered it was directly related to cardiovascular disease. At first the call was to limit the amount of trans fat in one’s diet, but ultimately it was decided that no amount of trans fat was healthy. The manufactured food industry fought this tooth and nail in one form or another often times involving their friends in government to mitigate the situation. It has become so interlocked into the foods manufacturing world removing it was going to be especially difficult.

Soon, the public began to recognize the risk associated with trans fat and began to move their purchasing practices to reflect this. There was also a marketing strategy to label foods as containing no trans fats. But, the insidiousness began to prevail. The food industry lobbied the Food and Drug Administration, as well as politicians, to limit the labeling requirements. It was finally agreed to that if a product contained less than 1/2 gram of trans fat per serving it could be labeled as “Zero grams trans fat”. This is deceptive and the food industry knew it.

Consumers were now given a false sense of safety in the Zero Grams Trans Fat label, especially when coupled with a big 0 in bold font. It did not mean there exists no trans fat in a product, just that it was less than half a gram per serving. Manufacturers then were permitted to act with chicanery to win the Zero Grams award. They could change the serving size accordingly, as denoted on the Warning Label, to make the portion size smaller or they could list components of food ingredients separately so as to lower the listing of partially hydrogenated oils further down the list of ingredients, making it seem less significant. What was the consumer left with? They had to then look at the ingredients specifically for the word “hydrogenated” to see if there actually were trans fats inside.

So what does this tell you about the manufactured food industry at the very least? It should become evident that the priority was not public health with regard to trans fat. Since trans fat does not exist in nature it didn’t need to be extracted from corn oil or anything else before it was introduced into the mixing bowl, they chose to put it in, and to leave it in. It’s the money, of course like any other business, but this was of greater priority than keeping your heart healthy. How’s that for saying they truly value you as their customer.

I remember all the strife among many consumers trying to get trans fat out of their diets by shouting at government or spending all this time looking at warning labels, and reading ingredient lists that are mysterious to all lacking a degree in organic chemistry. From an outside point of view it was truly bizarre. Yet the solution was so simple it truly was a non issue:

If you eat only organic whole foods such as fruit, vegetables, and fish, it is impossible to have any trans fats in your diet! It is that simple. Plus, you don’t have to worry about all that other garbage they put in that is also detrimental to your well being.

200px-NCI_Visuals_Food_Hot_DogFood manufactures also are close to politicians and use the political process to further actions that are not necessarily in your best interest. Two years ago I wrote an article describing how the largest food manufacturers spent millions of dollars to effectively hijack the GMO Labeling Initiative started from a grass roots initiative. (See the article for details) People were muted in their choice in my state, and it was due to lobbying by corporate food. Politicians do not always have your individual health in mind when they craft legislation or shy away from the implementation of good legislation that the food industry fears. In short you cannot trust politicians for making good choices for you.

There is more to this as well. It is economic as I said before. With many brand name manufactured food products, a rule of  thumb with them is that about twenty percent of the cost is advertising and marketing, twenty percent is packaging and the rest is cost of goods sold, retailer markup and profit for the maker. Since there is competition in the market toward lower prices that puts limits on value added manufacturing techniques to raise prices for the food, the elasticity can often be best obtained through cutting costs of ingredients and/or quality.

As I mentioned before manufacturers want to source the cheapest ingredients possible. That is why they often turn to corn for fillings and manufacturing corn products. They lobby government for corn subsidies which makes corn cheaper for them, encourages more harvesting of corn, and the demand for greater yields increases pressure toward GMOs, pesticides, herbicides, and fertilizers. But, reliance on corn products can increase pathologies as it has a high glycemic value and possibly leads to obesity in many. For those with environmental concerns, corn is an intensely thirsty crop requiring significantly more water per pound of yield than many others.

The number of large food manufacturers and agribusinesses are shrinking through consolidation. This means that farmers have fewer buyers to purchase their crops and become subject to dominance by these few entities who can dictate terms that are not always in the best interest of their families or consumers.

plate-of-veggiesLastly you have to look at the packaging and advertising costs. It is truly extraordinary the amount of cost relating to packaging. The amount that you are paying for packaging is the amount you waste on food purchases as is the waste spent on advertising. You would be quite upset if you bought an apple that was placed in a plastic bag with a logo on it and the clerk at the check-out stand told you it would cost half as much more because of the packaging. That is what is happening to you now with manufactured foods. Surely the manufacturer is providing you with economies of scale due to their large purchases of ingredients, at a much lower cost than what you could buy if you bought the veggie or meat from the same source as they did. But, you lose all of the savings in the marketing, packaging, fillers, value adding, and most importantly your health.

Later, you have to throw away all that cardboard, paper, plastic and who knows what. Soon, your garbage can is full, and you are still paying for the biggest garbage can your city will provide. So, you do the right thing by throwing it into a recycle bin that the city requires you to pay for. Mountains of food packaging piles up. Some of it remains for many, many decades to break down while buried in the city dump: for what? so that you could spend five minutes eating Hot Pockets and other products.

Advertising is almost as bad. You are paying money to people to convince you to buy their products. All these outlandish claims made, commercials that insult your intelligences, and those enticing your child to tug on your pants wanting you to buy it can be at the very least annoying. At your favorite big box store, you can walk through the center aisles of the store and be titillated with a sparkly radiance of colors to tempt every taste. It is to me like a row of Fiddler Crab males: the crab having one enormous claw that they vigorously wave, trying to entice a female to their burrow. It doesn’t matter that the crab might be useless inside the burrow, but he has that enormous claw so she is mesmerized into liking him. The fiddler is just like the food product, it is the packaging the matters and not the quality of “the goods”.

This is the ridiculousness that one must endure with corporate, processed food and it is entirely unnecessary. Do yourself a favor and take care of your health. This is why I write that if you only take one of my suggestions, please stay away from manufactured, warning labeled foods.

Dairy Products and Red Meat

This is a much simpler tenet, high levels of saturated fat. For this reason, your heart and arteries will love you if you cut these two items out of your diet. Of course it can be mitigated in some way by drinking non-fat milk. But consider also there exists significant amounts of sugar in the form of lactose. Dairy products such as cheeses and butter are frankly delicious and a staple in the Western diet. But they are unnecessary in health.

The best food an infant can consume is mother’s milk. Once grown, you have no nutritional need for milk, especially that of other animals. In drinking milk regularly you expose yourself to increased levels of cholesterol which can lead to the debilitating specter of cardiovascular disease and stroke, lactose intolerance, and weight gain. Milk can also contain saturated fat and sodium.

CowThe marketing of milk, both advertising and political, has convinced the public at large that milk is a healthy part of a nutritious diet. I don’t agree with that assessment. Most of the marketing involves presenting healthy levels of calcium and certain vitamins. Actually, you can find just as beneficial sources of calcium from many leafy green vegetables and vitamins from other sources without having the taint of saturated fat or cholesterol. So why is dairy put into government nutritional guidelines such as the Food Pyramid? It is because the dairy industry and other interests lobbied the government to include it. It is not fully derived from good nutritional practices.

Another aspect about milk is that many groups of individuals lack the enzymes to properly metabolize it. Caucasians generally have better lactose tolerance than do Asians. It is probable that this is because Europeans have much longer relied on dairy over the centuries and they adapted the ability to adjust to its effects. But since many Asian diets are not as heavily reliant on dairy, those living there ancestrally are more lactose intolerant. The problem is that the incorporation of food guidelines started rather unknowingly to be of white, Western European, ethnocentricity which worked for Caucasians but may not have been the best advice to races who physiologically were not adapted to a diet that was dairy based. Yet, we assimilated this into our culture at the detriment to others. But nevertheless I believe the heath consequences to dairy consumption outweigh the benefits that it can provide.

Red meat has its own problems from a nutritional basis. Red meat has intrinsically saturated fat in high levels, contains elevated levels of cholesterol, and studies are showing that those consuming a diet high in red meat are prone to greater levels of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and other ailments. It also is calorie intensive which leads to a propensity to gain weight in many individuals. It does provide protein, a beneficial trait, but again for me there are better sources of protein such as legumes, egg whites, and healthy fish.

But what is the unfortunate reality for both dairy and red meat that is mass consumed in the United States is that corporate animal husbandry practices engender conditions that are sometimes disturbing. The animals in some cases are put into deplorable conditions such as overcrowded pens, fed antibiotics to ward off disease caused by cramped conditions, and subjected to diets that the cows really are not physiologically evolved to property digest. Cows evolved to be grass feeders not of grain or corn. This does affect the quality of the resulting meat or dairy. If you are unable to eliminate red meat from your diet I would recommend at the very least to consume grass-fed, organic animals and to do so sparingly. Yes, it is more costly, but the flavor is remarkably improved.

Eggs from healthy chickens or quail are a good alternative source for protein. Due to cholesterol levels in the yokes, you are best served to eliminate eating these or reducing their consumption accordingly.

Potatoes, Rice and Grains

I try to limit these significantly, as it is mostly due to their carbohydrate nature. Starches metabolize into sugars and can lead to putting on weight. Additionally, carbs have a property that can lead to hunger earlier than eating proteins. The hunger can then drive us to eat more carbs which increases caloric consumption daily. Excessive calories leads to weight gain. Obesity leads to diabetes and a litany of other maladies. Carbs are not evil as our bodies need them especially in converting to energy and other processes.

Of course with grains comes a benefit of fiber and frankly I enjoy the taste of grainy foods. But I have found that other sources of fiber can come from vegetables.

Fish and Seafood

salmon-sashimiMy preferred diet labels me a Pescetarian. Essentially this means a vegetarian who also eats fish and shellfish. Some pescetarians also eat dairy and eggs. I embraced this diet due mostly to health conditions but frankly it is also because I enjoy the food much more this way.

Being a child of the 1970’s and having a grandfather who owned a meat market red meat and potatoes was what we ate, and we ate a lot of it. But much later in life my health deteriorated and I had to make radical changes to live. Since I adopted this diet my bad cholesterol levels, hypertension,  elevated triglyceride levels and other worries improved dramatically. Exercise and meds help also, but eating better is paramount.

Salmon provides excellent amounts of vitamin B12, D, selenium, niacin, protein, and omega-3 fatty acids–a beneficial fat that is linked to better heart health. Plus, it is simply delicious. I seldom pan fry fish, due to the use of small amounts of olive oil, but rather I serve it baked or broiled. Of course every once in a while I will treat myself to a delicious serving of sushi or sashimi. (skip the soy sauce please).

For many they ask how I do this as salmon is expensive. The trick is that I buy it in big lots. I wait until the salmon season arrives and I buy a large number of pounds in one big purchase. It is fresh off the boat so the cost is decent. (it was $6.50 a pound for wild-caught this year.) I take it home and carve it up into individual sized portions and send it straight into the freezer. We then eat it over the course of the next twelve months until it depletes and the next season comes along for the next buy. In doing this is save a great amount of money and I avoid the farm raised versions. Wild caught is markedly better fish in all respects. It is very economical to buy in this manner because come December, the price of wild caught salmon can double.

A small footnote about shellfish, you should again buy US or Canadian sourced due to better quality and regulations that are actually followed. But some shellfish has surprisingly high levels of cholesterol. Salmon does contain cholesterol but the omega-3’s help offset this and can lower triglycerides.

Community-Supported Agriculture

Despite what some might think when they hear the phrase Community-Supported Agriculture, it does not necessarily mean militant vegans or arugula snobs. Sure, there food co-ops in some areas that tend to get political with their food vending: dressing like hippies or having pictures of Hugo Chavez on the wall. I don’t go for that either, nor do I trap myself into some yuppie and swank farmer’s market to be among those professing their food arrogance by claiming they can tell exactly which state in India today’s saffron originated just by wafting in its fragrance. No, I am talking about joining a farm group that simply raises fruits and vegetables that provides healthy, truly fresh, and delicious vegetables each week.

With the CSA I belong to, I buy two “shares” of the harvest. This is $500 a share if prepaid before harvest. It sounds expensive but it really is not. For each share I receive a box containing whatever was harvested that week. There is always variety and the flavor is first rate since it was just picked and organically grown. So if you think about it one share can feed two individuals for a week. Depending on the harvest length the cost for me is between twenty and twenty-five dollars per week. Here you cut out all the middlemen, the wholesalers, the retailers, the brokers and so the price is lower and the quality is better. The food does not sit in transit for who knows how long. For me it is a better business model in many ways because everything stays in town and you do not waste money on advertising, marketing, or packaging. The farmer can also receive better prices. This year I am going to order another share and freeze what I can for the interim period between harvests.

As an added benefit to the CSA food, you will find that you do not need to overly season it, salt it, or do much to increase the flavor. The food stands for itself. As a result, the migration away from adding lots of cheeses, salt and butter, or liberating yourself from manufactured food is an easier transition.

If you are fortunate enough to have a good CSA nearby I invite you to enquire further with them.

I hope you found some benefit of reading about what I consider to be a beneficial food journey. If you don’t do it for economics, or the environment or any other cause do it for yourself. It doesn’t take a diet book, or counting calories, reading food warning labels, or watching some nutrition guru hock his wares in order to be healthy. It’s much simpler than it seems.

Enjoy your food.  It is life.

By Darren Smith

The views expressed in this posting are the author’s alone and not those of the blog, the host, or other weekend bloggers. As an open forum, weekend bloggers post independently without pre-approval or review. Content and any displays or art are solely their decision and responsibility.

78 thoughts on “A Simple Diet For A More Civilized Age

  1. Hey Darren, I can not disagree with anything you say in this article. Very sound advice. Debi and I also do a raw food diet occasionally. Went three months without cooking any of our foods one time. The theory is that cooking foods past 112 degrees or so kills the enzymes and causes chemical reaction(s) in the food, changing its nutritional value. However as we know some foods require cooking to make them eatable but they are rare. Either stay away from those or eat them cooked.

    I am not nearly as strict as you are, but everything I have read and studied over the years supports your conclusions. All meats are the muscles of animals so I’m not totally sold on the red meat issue. Gorillas have our exact intestinal systems and they are vegetarians. I think humans have slowly adopted themselves to be omnivores but from what I see, most people eat way to much meat and starches and not enough veggies, fruits, raw nuts and raw seeds.

    In my late thirties I was getting sick by the end of each work week with cold/flu like symptoms. My girl friend at the time Barbara bought me a book “Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Juices” by Dr. Norman Walker. By pure luck she had stumbled upon Walker who had the first nutritional laboratory here in the U.S. He was the mentor for such people as Jack Lelane, the Vitamin C guru Linus Pauling and many many others. This short book is in my and many others opinion the best nutritional primer. A must read for anyone who does not wish to spent a good portion of their elderly years at doctors offices.

    At 63 I take no “pharmaceutical” drugs or require any special heath treatments and hit a golf ball as far as I ever could. I see my golf buddies having knee, hip and shoulder replacements, constantly have their skin cancers cut out and all sorts of other heath problems. Whereas, I do various cleanses and try to eat as well as possible to give my body the ability to maintain it’s heath. For instance I make my own jello deserts using Knox gelatin, cut up fruits and juices. It, according to Dr. Joel Wallach and his wife, gives your body all the minerals and vitamins it needs to repair and maintain the bone, ligaments and other connective tissue structures in your body. I’ve torn both rotator cuffs by lack of proper warmup and/or over exertion and used only rest and my own physical therapy regime to a 100% recovery.

    I just finished building a 9′ x 18′ greenhouse and grow various fruits, herbs and vegetables. My lot is only 125′ x 125′ but you can still supplement you food bill here in So. Florida since we can grow year around and I grow organically.

    What Norman’s book teaches is how to juice fruits and vegetables and he gives a bunch of recipes and the benefits of the various foods. My favorite part is his explanation of what causes the common cold. You know that pesky illness that no one has yet to discover what really causes it; the infamous and mysterious cold bug.

  2. Good reminders. If you’re thinking of writing books about this, Michael Pollan has beat you to it. Too bad because he has probably made a small fortune for doing exactly what you have done plus quite a bit of book marketing.

    Also, if you are having guests for dinner, you don’t need to change your menu. I’ve found that guests appreciate a green salad, fish, three different colorful vegetables, and a great bread, plus mixed berries for dessert, even the guests who typically eat red meat and potatoes.

  3. Superb post, Darren. When one has a health issue they either live in denial or get “religion” as they say. Diabetes was kicking my ass and I got religion. Much of this diet I love. My diet is more Mediterranean and your diet incorporates much of that well established diet. Maybe I missed it, but I don’t see nuts in your diet. Almonds, walnuts and pistachios are part of my daily diet. My reward for walking is dark chocolate. I differ on meat. I eat it, although much less than Americans. Regarding organic, much of that is a scam. A lotta “organic” food sold in the US comes from China. They learned they can just stamp something “organic” and charge twice as much. I only buy organic directly from the farmers I know. Processed food is killing us. Look @ grocery carts of other people and note how much processed food is consumed in this country. My Italian upbringing taught me to reject the American food poison. I lost my soul for awhile working 80 hour weeks and lots of fast foods. But, I got it back.

    What jumps out @ me in your post is dairy. Growing up in an Italian family we ate dairy sparingly. There was never butter on the table. Cheese was used sparingly. Where I grew up in CT. w/ lots of Italians, we would often get pizza w/o mozzarella. That was the basic pizza in restaurants. Mozzarella was extra, and if ordered, was used sparingly. Most of the time my family got plain pizza and we would sprinkle a LITTLE grated parm on it. When I moved to the Midwest, I started seeing more and more dairy consumption. In KC, then Chicago, more dairy on menus and in home cooking. Then I moved to the Dairy State and saw the source of this insanity. Cheeseheads eat cheese in “mass quantities” like the Coneheads eat potato chips. Pizza has 2 inches of cheese on it. I totally agree w/ you on milk. Kids need calcium as they grow so milk makes sense for them. But in Wisconsin, grown adults drink glasses of milk w/ meals. It’s called the dairy farm diet. Most don’t make it past 70 years! Dairy subsidies are the Holy Grail in Wisconsin. And, like ALL subsidies, should be abolished.

  4. HSR, I know a kid[20’s] who is Type 1 diabetic. He is a raw vegan and has fundamentalist “religion” on that diet.

  5. That is all great if you have a fairly high free spending limit and you live next to an ocean. Realistically, that diet can only work with at least those two obvious factors. Of course there are reasonable moderations to it that would allow for more universal application.

  6. Good suggestions Darren, although I don’t agree with all of them and some are not feasible for many people due to no or limited access to the types of foods you suggest as well as the costs.

    I cook almost exclusively from scratch and rarely buy any pre processed foods. Being in a rural area, we also do have access to non factory farm meats, locally grown animals, chickens, rabbits and eggs, fresh vegetables and fruit in season, but we are the exception I believe.

    Lastly, and this is very important, you should view a nutrition label as a Warning Label.

    Definetly. My rule of thumb is if I don’t know what these ingredients on the labels are OR how to even pronounce them…..don’t eat it. The other rule is that if it is white (refined flour, rice, potatoes,sugar etc) eat sparingly.

  7. Very good article.

    My rule of thumb, stay away from white foods (white rice, white flour, white potatoes, white sugars, etc.) along with most “processed” foods.

    Thankfully our fight against GMO’s and evil companies that produce them are starting to lose the fight despite the battles they have managed to win in the past.

    Monsanto has been charged with crimes against humanity in the world court and it has dramatically hurt their bottom line.
    https://www.rt.com/news/324826-monsanto-hague-tribunal-ecocide/
    https://www.rt.com/usa/328128-monsanto-announces-job-cuts/

    Campbell’s is going to start labeling the GMO’s in their products.

    campbellsoupcompany.com/newsroom/news/2016/01/07/labeling/

    US farmers slowly turning away from GMO grains.

    wsj.com/articles/fields-of-gold-gmo-free-crops-prove-lucrative-for-farmers-1422909700

    Still plenty more battles to fight until these companies file for chapter 7 bankruptcy.

  8. All in all pretty good. Keep in mind many plants have a higher percentage of protein than animals. Remember the “quality or complete” protein myth is a debunked myth that even the author that promulgated it in her ” Diet for a small planet” corrected in her revised editions. All food poisoning comes from animal sources. In other than survival situations, it is better to avoid animal products entirely. Calling an animal protein, is rather revealing as to why sanitizing the usage of the description is required.

  9. You can’t repeat this enough. Thanks Darren.

    Regarding meats, we buy lean ground beef in bulk, freeze it, and then incorporate it into spaghetti sauces and chills, using non contaminated ingredients. The most important thing is to eat meat as a rare treat and base the daily diet on the good stuff. My knowledge of the body seems to point to damage being done through unrelenting ingestion of the bad stuff. The body can clean itself out so if one’s main diet is good it will purge the damage done. It is hard to concentrate the diet on fresh, fresh vegetables as these are not always easy to find and can be very expensive. Frozen is not always so bad if it is organic and without additives. Some grains are also beneficial.

    The healthiest I ever ate was during the years I lived in France. On my way from my studio to my apartment I passed markets and picked up my lunch ingredients fresh. I knew they were fresh as no one would buy stuff it it wasn’t fresh. Unfortunately the French have the big super markets as well. Overall Europeans are much more conscious of what they eat. Perhaps that’s because eating is still celebrated as an important moment of the day, but not so much anymore. When was the last time you heard of a family getting together for the noon meal which occupied a two hour break in the middle of the day? In Italy three hours. In Spain four hours.

  10. There are no processed oils in my home. Oil begins oxidizing the minute it is extracted, and when consumed, inflames arteries and damages cells. The body then responds by producing cholesterol, which is a healing hormone to deal with the inflammation. Statin drugs lowel cholesterol, paving the way to prolong inflammation, narrowing arteries and excelerating risk for heart attack.

    There is no such thing as a good oil, including the holy grail, olive oil, the same as there is no such thing as a good pedophile.

    Mammals need lots of fat, and nature provides ample sources, such as in nuts and avacados, which must be eaten without converting into peanut butter or guacamole, both of which are a source of more inflammation than from smoking.

    Sugar does not cause diabetes. But fat, when oxidized, does. Dr. Abrahamson described how in his 1951 “Body, Mind & Sugar,” and UK twin doctors Chris and Xand Van Tullekan prove it in their new PBS documentary, “Sugar Vs. Fat,” aired January 1, 2016. I found it on YouTube, too.

    We can thank the AMA for deep-sixing Abrahamson’s profound work, the consequences of which the medical community has now been responsible for more deaths than all wars and terrorism combined.

    Whenever I think of establishment, political or medical, I recall what Nietzsche said: “When a hundred men stand together, each loses his mind and gets another one.”

  11. Darren,
    Overall I enjoyed your article. The good word about eating real food needs to be heard. So many of the chronic illness that plagues Americans (and very likely clouds our judgment) can be traced to lifestyle choices, especially our dietary choices. I started getting sick in college, but I felt really terrible after my third child was born. After seeing a functional medicine doctor (an MD with additional training), who, among other things, told me to change my diet in a prescribed way. I am finally feeling good.

    There are few points on which I must quibble, however. Oil and fat are required by every cell in the body for their lipid cell membrane. Nerve cells require fat to make the myelin sheath that is necessary for the transmission of information. Without oil and fat, fat-soluble vitamins like A, D, E, and K cannot be effectively absorbed, leading to sub-clinical or outright deficiencies with their own problems. Some hormones require fatty acids to function properly.

    Further, saturated fat is not the physiological culprit behind heart disease or obesity. Carbohydrates are, particularly the carbohydrate starches that predominate the Standard American Diet: grains. No one is going to get heart disease from eating carrots. Correlation does not mean causation. Most people who eat lots of saturated fat, eat meats that are factory-farmed, and, also eat lots of carbs (e.g., hamburger with french fries). You are right about the fish, though, too: wild-caught, high omega-3 fatty acid fish is excellent for good health!

    Regarding the triglycerides, most of the triglycerides that are associated with an elevated risk of heart disease come from carbohydrates, from a process known as de novo lipogenesis. “The more carbohydrates flooding the circulation after a meal, the more will be converted to triglycerides and stored as fat” (Taubes, 387). It is not fat but these carb-derived triglycerides, combined with increased insulin that lead to obesity.

    Also associated with triglycerides is cholesterol. Our bodies produce the majority of cholesterol. “Dietary cholesterol, for instance, has an insignificant effect on blood cholesterol” (Taubes, 19). The VLDL cholesterol (the really bad cholesterol) is produced in the liver to carry the majority of triglycerides (which, as noted above, are formed following carbohydrate consumption).

    Cholesterol is needed for certain hormones and the synthesis for vitamin D. Eating egg yolks is not the problem; eating too many carbs (as most Americans do) is the problem.

  12. Nick,
    A friend of mine changed his diet (stopped trying to “balance” his carbs, just got rid of them), eating now mostly good meats and lots of veggies (Paleo-ish). He is off metformin! Hooray!

  13. EXCELLENT post!

    But, it is unfortunate that this – and other related improvements in – diet, are costly! It seems that ‘junk’ and ‘fast’ food, while being less nutritious, are often FAR more expensive than ‘good’ food.

    Any suggestions (from anyone, please!) for those who are less affluent, on fixed/limited ‘incomes’, or are limited in their shopping choices through either location or shopping outlets? Thank you.

  14. Darren,

    Great Article! Better safe than sorry?

    Excerpt from the following article: ‘What’s Worse For Your Heart, Sugar or Fat?’ by Samantha Olson

    ‘With coronary heart disease (CHD) killing more than 370,000 people every year in the United States, a team of researchers from Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute and Albert Einstein College of Medicine were interested in seeing what’s worse for the heart — saturated fats or refined sugars? Their findings, published in Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases, argues that, after years of believing fat was worse, it could have been sugar all along.

    “We now have more than a half century of data as well as increased understanding of how nutrition impacts the body and specifically coronary heart disease,” said the study’s co-author James DiNicolantonio, a cardiovascular research scientist at the American Heart Institute, in a press release. “After a thorough analysis of the evidence it seems appropriate to recommend dietary guidelines shift focus away from recommendations to reduce saturated fat and toward recommendations to avoid added sugars. Most importantly recommendations should support the eating of whole foods whenever possible and the avoidance of ultra-processed food.”

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medical/what%e2%80%99s-worse-for-your-heart-sugar-or-fat/ar-BBod3IE?ocid=spartandhp

  15. ExPatNJ,
    We use some frozen veggies and berries, which are a pretty good price and more nutritious than canned. We try to favor organic based on whether they are part of “the dirty dozen” or “clean 15” or not. Even then, we still buy some conventionally raised fruits and veggies, and wash them well, because they are still better than processed food. We use large bags of brown basmati rice or dry beans sometimes.

    I garden and process as much as I can. I have a cold frame to try to extend the season, too. Gardening can even be done in containers or mixed in with flower beds. Swiss chard has lovely stalks, kale has neat leaves, and many lettuces are striking, too. There are some container-sized plants that can be started from seed: mini cucumbers, patio tomatoes, etc. People will use scrounged plastic containers hung from terraces or put in windowsills. Jung’s has pretty good seed prices to start seeds rather than pay for seedlings.

    I hear Aldi’s has good prices on produce, though farmers markets do, too. Some of Walmart’s produce is decent, too).

  16. Neo,

    You might not have been aware but this website only allows two links per comment. I corrected your post 2016/01/16 at 11:25 am to de-reference two of the links so that it would work. If you would like for the readers to review more than two links this can be accomplished by using additional comments.

  17. RWL, it is staggering how many arguments there are on both sides of fat and sugar. Have you seen the new documentary, “Sugar Vs. Fat,” I refer to in my comment above at 1:05?

  18. RWL, the authors of the research study work for the AMA, the same outfit that endorsed trans fat as safe, after it had accepted millions in contributions from the makers of Crisco.

  19. Samantha,

    I do apologize, but I only read Darren’s article. So, after reading your comment, Darren’s article, and the article that I posted, then are you suggesting that it is the other way around (avoiding fat and not sugar?)? We should be avoiding or greatly reducing our intake of both?

  20. HSR, I’ll convey that info to the young man. Nicest kid in the world. Is positive and proactive about his health.

  21. Prairie, Good to see you again. Good for your friend. And, your friend is correct, carbs are just like sugar. Alcohol is as well.

  22. Samantha,
    I am not sure what you mean by fat oxidation. Fat oxidation means the burning of fat for energy. Do you mean processed oils that when exposed to oxygen they end up deteriorating? Like, turning rancid?

  23. Prairie Rose @ 6:02.

    Yes, oxidation as a consequence of exposure to oxygen. Even an avocado, after you cut it in half, begins oxidizing immediately. Heating oils, as in cooking, makes them immediately not fit for consumption for either humans or animals.

  24. RWL,
    Excess sugar (glucose) in the blood keeps insulin high, which then causes the glucose to get shoveled as fatty acids called triglycerides into fat cells. When insulin stays high, the fatty acids do not get released from storage, which continues the cycle. Eventually, the body becomes resistant to the insulin and says, ‘nope, no more room in my muscles or my fat cells’. So, glucose stays high in the blood, which is seen on a blood test or urine test.

    Good Calories, Bad Calories by Gary Taubes discusses why fat does not make us fat but carbohydrates do.

  25. RWL @5:45

    Sugar does not cause diabetes.

    Neither does fat, except when oxidized, hydrogenated or heated to damaging temperatures.

    The UK identical twin doctors in the Sugar Vs. Fat documentary show how, after one goes on a sugar diet, the other on a fat diet.

    The results are profound. See the film on youtube — before they take it down:

    BBC Horizon 2015 Sugar and Fat (BBC Documentary) 53 min.

  26. Prairie Rose, I restored your comment on 2016/01/16 at 1:43 pm. Somehow it got snagged but I don’t know why.

  27. So, my post got eaten much earlier today. I had broken it into two parts to post separately so it wasn’t such a word wall. Here is part two:

    Salt is another point of issue. For one, most people ingest a ton of salt by eating processed foods, not by salting their food. Salting one’s food accounts for a tiny fraction of one’s salt intake.

    High blood pressure is arguably also due to excessive carb intake in conjunction with low magnesium intake (people do not eat their leafy greens). “Eating carbohydrates prompts the kidneys to hold on to salt, rather than excrete it. The body then retains extra water to keep the sodium concentration in the blood constant” (Taubes, 149). And, “researchers had demonstrated that the water-retaining effect of carbohydrates was due to the insulin secreted, which in turn induced the kidneys to reabsorb sodium rather than excrete it” (Taubes, 149).

    My hypothesis about high blood pressure and magnesium is from the “fix” for preeclamptic women is to give them intravenous magnesium. Magnesium is important for the suppleness of arteries. If arteries start to stiffen, blood pressure increases: “we demonstrated that a magnesium deficiency is involved in the pathogenesis of primary hypertension” (http://hyper.ahajournals.org/content/47/2/e3.full). Eat plenty of leafy greens and almonds, along with the other aspects of a healthy diet and lifestyle and the likelihood of developing hypertension will be pretty low.

    While I wanted to address these few points, I do want to applaud you for sharing this helpful information, especially on CSAs. As you said, ‘the food stands for itself’. I’m so glad the seed catalogs are starting to come in the mail. I can hardly wait to start my garden.

  28. Foolish advice, Darren, believing in the “charmed substances.” Woody Allen has exposed the fallacy of so-called health foods in his prophetic film Sleeper (1973):

  29. Wow! Over 5,000,000 views.

    Published on May 4, 2015

    Want to know what happens in your body when you switch from eating conventional food to organic? Watch this! The study was conducted by the Swedish Environmental Research Institute IVL, and the full report is available here: https://www.coop.se/organiceffect

  30. I was surprised to learn, from an older sister of mine, about a doctor that had done a small study of his own. He had about 20 heart patients and noticed that some of them were doing better than others. When he questioned them he found that some had ignored his instructions to cut back on their salt intake. He continued to watch them and the trend continued. He got his patients together as a group and had a discussion with them. They decided (volunteered) to conduct their own study and see what the results would be. They gradually increased their salt intake while being carefully and frequently monitored by the doctor. Gradually many had improvements in their conditions and some were even able to discontinue medications. The study continued and the amount of salt continued to increase. The results were even more impressive as time went on. I wish I had kept the link to that information.
    There was also more to my sister’s message to me. There was another article about the brittle bones in elderly people and a link to a lack of salt. This particular information indicated that salt played a key role in binding the calcium in bones, and that a low salt diet was leading to the brittle bones in many elderly, not a lack of calcium.
    Two things to note; 1) Sea salt (light gray color – hasn’t had the minerals processed out) is the best source of salt but it does not contain iodine and an iodine supplement is suggested if you use that. 2) There are many sodium compounds, other than Sodium Chloride (salt), that are not good for your health and they are mostly found in the processed foods.

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/its-time-to-end-the-war-on-salt/

  31. Scarecrow,
    I think you mean vitamin c. Vitamin c is required to help bind calcium to bone, and, it can help reduce high blood pressure. I have heard osteoporosis referred to as scurvy of the bones.

  32. Last night I heard on the radio a law firm advertising for Roundup victims.

    Wouldn’t that be all of us? Who in this world isn’t a victim of Roundup already?

  33. Salt is good, contrary to the disciples at the AMA. It’s why ranchers buy salt in huge blocks and place them in pastures for cows to lick whenever they feel like it. Animals don’t do well without salt. Salt deficiency impairs digestion, making it difficult to absorb all of the vital nutrients from food. Sugar requires very little digestion, explaining why obesity is so prevalent in the face of salt-deficient diets. People are always hungry because they’re always chasing nutrients they can’t fully absorb. They are malnourished, obese people.

    Protein metabolism requires huge amounts of calcium. If carnivores didn’t eat the bones, they would come down with osteoporosis. It’s why Eskimos get osteoporosis by the time they reach 40, after a lifetime of consuming a high protein diet. If you are eating the standard American diet, the high protein metabolism will eventually leech the calcium from all of your bones until they are chalk, unless you are supplementing with not only calcium but all of the cofactors needed to absorb calcium. The protein you need each day you can get from 2 large eggs. That’s because virtually every other food we eat has protein already. It’s in potatoes, and peanuts are loaded with it.

    If your doctor belongs to the AMA, you have the wrong doctor. My doctor doesn’t belong to the AMA, which he once described as a terrorist organization, after learning it had endorsed trans fats and taken contributions from the producers of Crisco. Trans fats have now killed more people than all the wars and terrorism combined.

  34. Personally, I have ignored all of the governmental mandates about what we should and should not eat. I cook from scratch and with only the occasional pre made or processed items purchased.

    I learned to cook from scratch, using real food items not because I was on some sort of crusade or riding and ideological pony. I cook this way because it is how MY mother and grandmother and greats etc have cooked. I cook this way because it is CHEAPER and I’m better able to control not only what I eat but control future meal planning and make judicious use of leftovers. It costs less and is better for you!

    So I use salt (iodized, kosher, sea salt), sugar in my recipes when it calls for it and to make the food taste better Sweetenters.( cane sugar, brown sugar, refined sugar) honey, butter (lots of butter), oils (olive, vegetable, peanut, lard and yes…even Crisco). Eggs….lots. Red meat once or twice a week. Nothing beats a good Rib Eye steak grilled with spices, sea salt and garlic butter. Pork, rabbit (local grower) poultry, fish whenever I can. Fruits and vegetable in season or frozen. Cheese!! I don’t drink milk.

    We do less of the pastas, carbs, white rice, white potatoes, breads. Carbs are addictive so we are sparing on that.

    I can’t be picky about organic, and frankly I think “organic” is a crock of literal sh*t.

    I DO drink some alcohol and enjoy a good scotch or glass of wine.

    I don’t take any medications and so far as I know, have no medical issues of any kind. For a 60 plus a few years old person I guess this is unusual. Maybe it is my diet. Maybe it is my genetics.

    Variety and taste. Each ingredient is part of a whole symphony of good food and components of your body……. SO I totally ignore the blather from the government and food nazis. Eat what I want, in moderation and with variety.

    @ Prairie Rose

    I’m so glad the seed catalogs are starting to come in the mail. I can hardly wait to start my garden.

    ME TOO. It is time to treat the fruit trees for aphids, (dormant oil) and poison the ants. Soap solution on the rose bushes. Plow the leaf mulch into the orchard. Prep the planting beds and wine barrel planters. Start the tomatoes and eggplant indoors…too cold to plant outside until May here.

    A few years ago I grew Fava beans. They were so good and unavailable in our local markets, I’ll do it again. I did Leeks a few years ago and some of them went wild…..they have the prettiest flowers :-)

  35. Hildegard @1:13

    Good find! That before and after bar chart on pesticides and chemicals says it all.

    I’m wondering if Dust Bunny Queen has seen it?

  36. Dust Bunny Queen, you’ll probably live to be 100 plus years old. But I think you should rethink that Crisco. No need to be in a wheelchair just because you’re a hundred.

  37. @ Samantha

    I don’t think a 1/3 cup of crisco in a pie crust a couple of times a year is going to kill me :-)

    Of course, lard is much better for pie crust or a combination of lard and butter for that spinach quiche.

    I have to poison the ants, they are too small to shoot. I’m not eating them anyway.

  38. What a great post and thread! I didn’t read every single word here. This is a solid group of information.

    I only have one thing to add: Coconut oil. It is magic for lots of things. Eggs fried in coconut oil? I thought it was strange at first but now when I have normal eggs it’s like ‘meh’.

    Coconut oil on a cut or scrape helps it heal super fast. You can also mix it in with your favorite shampoo and it will do wonders for your hair/scalp.

    It’s great in some hot chocolate. Sometimes I just eat a chunk because it’s delicious by itself. Also helps chapped lips.

  39. DBQ,
    I will have to try fava beans again. Mine were pitiful last year, mostly because I let life get in the way of weeding.

    Lard pie crusts and lard tortillas–so yummy! I am gluten-free for health reasons, so memories must suffice.

  40. Dust Bunny Queen, I agree, it won’t kill you. But if there’s lard available, why add poison to your pie? Crisco is a vegetable oil, something nature never intended for mammals to consume without being in its natural state, such as in peanuts, avocados, etc. The minute vegetable oils are extracted, they begin oxidizing and going rancid, which, when consumed, causes incredible inflammation all over the body, accounting for why so many of us are on 4 and 5 prescription meds. If our goal is to remain free of meds, then part of our strategy has to include avoiding any oil that is extracted. No matter what the special interests are telling us, there’s no longer an argument about the evils of extracted oils — and that includes coconut oil, too.

  41. Steg,
    We love coconut oil here, too.

    Chocolate coconuts balls are delicious. Mix hard coconut oil, shredded raw coconut, cocoa powder, a bit of vanilla or mint, and some maple syrup or honey to fast. Roll into balls and freeze.

    Though, this time of year I may go with your suggestion of hot cocoa with coconut oil.

  42. Aww, Samantha, don’t rain on the coconut parade! At least it isn’t Crisco, and, we are not selling out to corporatism.

  43. Lol, Prairie Rose. Thanks for the recipe, that sounds pretty good.

    Samantha, does it make a difference how the extraction process is done? All the coconut oil I find always says something like ,’raw, cold pressed’, which I think is basically just crushing and squeezing then straining chunks out of liquid. It remains in the natural state it was created in- no additives or anything.

    But you can always put it in your shampoo or make a pot-pourri something. It smells nice. I bet coconut oil molecules in the air would help someone with breathing problems. Pure speculation from me, but like I said- the oil is magic on wounds.

    I got my first real chemical burn this year when I kicked some mineral spirits and it soaked into my foot without me realizing it until several hours later, when I was strangely itchy and could swear I still smelled spirits somewhere.

    WELL after that minor crisis and cleaning, I applied coconut oil to the burned area every night and it made a huge noticeable impact with the healing. I stopped applying it for some nights to see if my body would heal that fast on it’s own, and it was like a virtual stop. So, back to the oil.

  44. Darren, your series of articles on health and food are some of my favorites. Thank you for the information.

    There are aspects of pesticides and herbicides that some people may not be aware of. Next gen products are incorporated into the plant tissues. You cannot wash it off. Some GMO plants are engineered to actually produce pesticide in their own tissues. Such poisons contaminate pollen, which sickens bees and may contribute to Colony Collapse Disorder. Our bees are vital to pollinator-dependent crops.

    The heavy pesticide and herbicide use associated with GMOs and conventional farming techniques also pose very serious health hazards to farm workers.

    http://www.farmworkerjustice.org/content/pesticide-safety

    Pesticide exposure causes farmworkers to suffer more chemical-related injuries and illnesses than any other workforce in the nation. Workers who mix, load or apply pesticides can be exposed to toxic pesticides due to spills, splashes, defective, missing or inadequate protective equipment, direct spray, or drift. Workers who perform hand labor tasks in areas that have been treated with pesticides face exposure from direct spray, drift or contact with pesticide residues on the crop or soil. Farmworker families can also be injured by pesticides when farmworker children play in treated fields; when workers inadvertently take home pesticide residues on their hair, skin or clothing; or when pesticides drift into residences, schools and other areas located near fields.

    Pesticides pose risks of short- and long- term illness to farmworkers and their families. Acute (immediate) health effects of pesticide exposure include rash, eye irritation, dizziness, nausea and vomiting, and headaches. More serious acute effects include difficulty breathing, seizures, loss of consciousness and death. Chronic (long-term) effects can result in cancer, neurological disorders, hormonal and reproductive health problems, birth defects and infertility. Even low levels of pesticide exposure over time can lead to these chronic health effects.

    I recall when I visited a banana farm in the Caribbean, I was shocked to see workers covered in fungal rings. They spray fungicide constantly on the bananas as they packaged them for shipment. This gave rise to fungicide super-fungi in their own skin. I was ashamed that the practices we use to produce our food was making these workers sick. They kept at the job because it was a poor area and they needed the money.

    Also, many years ago a relative of mine, an ecologist, worked with indigenous people harmed by Big Ag conventional broccoli growers. When the US banned certain pesticides, they merely shifted production across our borders. The indigenous people working the farm were uneducated about toxic hazards, and were dipping broccoli starts by hand into toxic chemicals. They suffered massive rises in birth defects and illness and other severe consequences. My relative discovered a pesticide free means for them to grow the broccoli successfully, and resolved the issue. This was many years ago, and I do not know if we have closed the loop where domestic circumvent EPA laws by crossing the border.

    I do not think it is right to cause harm to the health of farm workers to grow our food. As a mother, I do not feel comfortable that a blast of water will wash off toxic chemicals with warning labels that they cause nausea and cancer, and then feed it to my kid. Growing your own organic food is the modern day Victory Garden, and buying organic votes with our dollars for farm workers’ health and safety.

    Also, a note about fat free milk. It is actually a processed food, and not the health food it’s been advertised to be. Fat Free milk is an industrial by product of making cream. Traditionally, this leftover product was fed to hogs to fatten them for market. Dairies have cashed in on the low-fat fad by selling this as a health food to the public. However, to disguise its natural bluish tint, they add powdered nonfat milk. But the process of producing powdered nonfat milk creates oxidized cholesterol, which is quite unhealthy. In addition, milk’s vitamins are fat soluble. Removing the cream removes the vitamin K and a lot of the other vitamins, and what remains is not easily absorbed.

    If you are going to consume dairy, choose the whole food, not the processed version.

    http://butterbeliever.com/fat-free-dairy-skim-milk-secrets/

    With all that said, the pursuit of health and nutrition should be a positive in your life. There are some prominent examples on the Internet of people who have taken nutrition to an unhealthy, self destructive obsession. If anyone has not shared a single meal with family or friends in years because they only eat organic vegan or Monday through Saturday are Juice Cleanse Days, it might have tipped towards the negative. If someone has turned orange and their hair is falling out because they only eat carrots, it might be a negative. Or as Darren has pointed out, if judging the origin of saffron by scent alone has become another arrow in the Holier-Than-Thou-Health-Conscious quiver, then it might be a negative.

    Eating healthy, whole foods is a loving thing to do for your body, the environment, and for those who produce your food. Just keep everything in balance.

  45. Another topic I wanted to mention was the contamination of seafood with mercury. Even though salmon is a low mercury fish, the FDA recommends children and pregnant women eat no more than 2 servings a week.

    Fish is one of the most healthy proteins on Earth. It saddens me that we have managed to selfishly pollute our entire ocean to the point that all seafood contains some level of mercury. And our thirst for mass produced Chinese products supports a toxic manufacturing industry that just keeps pumping it out into our water and our air. We share the blame with China for the toxic, noxious miasma sickening our world, much like the tale of the Lorax.

  46. Nick – you are so right that you have to be cautious about an organic label.

    Our good friend is an organic third generation dairyman. He’s famous for having developed optimal pasture forage. His herd is straight out of a happy cows commercial, with low density strolling through lush, green rolling hills. They line themselves up to be milked. He tests every stage of his milk production, so his milks are safe whole foods with a good omega 6 profile.

    High density herds kept in filthy packed lots are also marketed as organic, but much cheaper. They eat subsidized corn feeds, which skews their omega 6/omega 3 ratios towards the unhealthy, much like what happens in the human body on a grain dense diet. They get no grass. And they use bulldozers to periodically scrape the deep manure from the pens into huge, stinking piles. You can smell them for miles around enough to make your eyes water. I just recently drove through cattle country from a horse show. And it stinks. Nothing at all like our friend’s operation.

  47. Good, friendly and amiable conversation w/ women leading the way. My 2 cents. One should not eat pie often. Pie crust made w/ lard is much better than w/ Crisco. So, use common sense. If you’re going to have pie a few times a year, enjoy it w/ a lard crust. “Everything in moderation.”

  48. Steg, the extraction process makes a huge difference. They cold press oils to prevent oxidation that comes from heating. But then you’re no better off, after heating these oils in a fry pan, than if you purchased non cold pressed oils.

    It’s refreshing to see how many people have become, in a matter of just a short time, healthy food enthusiasts. Just a few short years ago, whenever I brought up the topic of healthy food, I was berated, insulted and skewered. Nick, you started out as one of the worst offenders, but then you gradually came around and I felt we became friends.

    I see a lot of people missing from this blog now. They’re probably all sick or have died off after having been stubbornly attached to their old food habits and lifestyles.

    Enthusiasm for health food is growing exponentially. That’s because thousands of new sick people join the ranks every day, unable to find solutions from their doctor or the healthcare industry. So they turned to the internet looking for answers. Two years ago no one knew what glyphosate was. Today it’s a household word.

    To be cont’d (my horse is upset about something)

  49. Samantha,
    Doesn’t the smoke point of an oil change the calculus? Extra virgin olive oil has a low smoke point (250F), so it should not be used for cooking. Whereas, refined olive oil has a much higher smoke point (450F). (Sarah Ballantyne, 219)

  50. I agree with you about not eating processed foods. But not much else. I just finished a Pork loin Roast (with garlic, onions, and fresh basil) and it was delicious. And so is champagne I’m drinking.

    I’d rather live 65 good years then 80 bad years eating tofu and broccoli.

  51. ExPatNJ:

    There are several ways to cut down on the cost of going organic.

    First, GOOGLE Certified Naturally Grown to see if there is a farmer in your area. CNG is the small farm’s alternative to costly Organic Certification, which is beyond the reach of small farmers. It verifies that food is grown via organic methods, but it does not cost as much.

    Second, check out your local farmers market at http://www.localharvest.org. A farmers market is just a marketplace for local growers. Unless specified, it is not organic. Some markets are all organic, and some will have some organic producers. NEVER, EVER believe a seller who claims their food is grown organically unless he or she can prove it with an organic certification or Certified Naturally Grown. The biggest scam at farmers markets is fraudulently claiming to have organic produce when it’s conventionally grown. A farmer friend of mine has seen this at multiple farmers markets, which is frustrating since she spends so much time and money to get certified herself.

    Many grocery stores now offer some organic choices. Fresh whole foods are better than processed organic foods.

    Another alternative is an option Darren pointed out – Community Supported Agriculture. My own experience has been mixed. It teaches you to plan your menus seasonally. You quickly learn what produce grows when, and your food is the freshest. You often get access to tender, quickly perishable fruits that would never survive getting trucked long distances – like delicious mulberries or alpine strawberries. The farmer essentially sells shares of the harvest before it’s even planted. Then as crops become ready, they deliver a box to you every week. What I dislike is not having a say what went into the basket. I despise grapefruit. I don’t care how healthy they are, I would have to be seriously starving to eat one. Getting a box with 10 grapefruit is a complete waste of money. Too often I would discover veggies or fruits that we didn’t like. I’d either feed them to my hens, or they’d rot in the fridge while I tried to think of a way to make them edible. Beets, for instance, always taste like dirt to me no matter how I cook them. I ended up wasting too much food and stopped getting CSAs, choosing the farmers market and regular store instead. If you are not as finicky, then CSA might be a good way to go.

    Finally, my favorite alternative, if you are lucky enough not to live surrounded by ravening hordes of rodents in a desert, is to grow your own. There are many certified online seed stores. And you can find plans to build your own compost pile. Nothing goes to waste. Whatever veggie (never animal!) organic scraps you don’t eat goes on the compost pile. Ensure there is the correct brown to green ratio (GOOGLE how to make compost), and voila, the finished product fertilizes your garden or landscaping.

    This is supposed to be a good source for getting stable organics, although I haven’t tried them. Again, the more fresh whole foods the better.

    https://thrivemarket.com

  52. Karen, While most dairy farms in WI.are not organic, they are all family farms. I never saw the factory farms you referenced until I drove west. TX, NM, AZ, and CA have many. You smell them 20 minutes before you see them. I had heard WI. farms rail against factory farms for years but didn’t truly understand why until I saw and smelled them. Appalling.

  53. Prairie Rose @ 6:15

    Smoke points are big, for anyone foolish enough to be still eating fried food. Saturated fat vs unsaturated matters, too.

    There’s a fish fry at one of the local places in our town every Friday night, for all the folks who are intent on maintaining their type 2 diabetes status. They all claim deep fried food once in awhile won’t hurt you. Well, a pack of cigarettes once a week probably won’t hurt you either, but why would you smoke a pack in the first place?

    The government mandate seatbelts to save lives. So where’s the mandate to outlaw fried food, which probably kills five million people annually in the USA alone. Premature death worldwide is something like 1 billion people.

    There was no such thing as Indian fry bread before the government started subsidizing Native Americans with government oil, flour, sugar, etc. Indian women had no idea what to do with the staples, until someone figured out that frying dough in the oil tasted pretty good. Today, type 2 diabetes is epidemic among Native Americans. The incidence of diabetes among the Zuni tribe, alone, exceeds 90%. Talk about failure of big government and big health care.

    Smoke points for cooking oils/fats
    http://home.comcast.net/~stockfish/files/smokePointsCookingOils.txt

  54. My apologies for the dead link. I’ve read that the average lifespan of a web pages is only 6 months. How true it is. That’s why I always save pages to storage. I have the file on my SD card, so here is the content:
    _____________________________
    Sorted by temperature & alphabetically

    canola oil, unrefined………………….225¡F…..107¡C
    flaxseed oil, unrefined………………..225¡F…..107¡C
    safflower oil, unrefined……………….225¡F…..107¡C
    sunflower oil, unrefined……………….225¡F…..107¡C
    corn oil, unrefined……………………320¡F…..160¡C
    high-oleic sunflower oil, unrefined……..320¡F…..160¡C
    extra virgin olive oil…………………320¡F…..160¡C
    peanut oil, unrefined………………….320¡F…..160¡C
    safflower oil, semi-refined…………….320¡F…..160¡C
    soy oil, unrefined…………………….320¡F…..160¡C
    walnut oil, unrefined………………….320¡F…..160¡C
    hemp seed oil…………………………330¡F…..165¡C
    butter……………………………….350¡F…..177¡C
    canola oil, semi-refined……………….350¡F…..177¡C
    coconut oil…………………………..350¡F…..177¡C
    sesame oil, unrefined………………….350¡F…..177¡C
    soy oil, semi-refined………………….350¡F…..177¡C
    vegetable shortening…………………..360¡F…..182¡C
    lard…………………………………370¡F…..182¡C
    macadamia nut oil……………………..390¡F…..199¡C
    canola oil, refined……………………400¡F…..204¡C
    walnut oil, semi-refined……………….400¡F…..204¡C
    extra virgin olive oil, high quality…….405¡F…..207¡C
    sesame oil……………………………410¡F…..210¡C
    cottonseed oil………………………..420¡F…..216¡C
    grapeseed oil…………………………420¡F…..216¡C
    virgin olive oil………………………420¡F…..216¡C
    almond oil……………………………420¡F…..216¡C
    hazelnut oil………………………….430¡F…..221¡C
    peanut oil……………………………440¡F…..227¡C
    sunflower oil…………………………440¡F…..227¡C
    corn oil, refined……………………..450¡F…..232¡C
    high-oleic sunflower oil, refined……….450¡F…..232¡C
    peanut oil, refined……………………450¡F…..232¡C
    safflower oil, refined…………………450¡F…..232¡C
    sesame oil, semi-refined……………….450¡F…..232¡C
    soy oil, refined………………………450¡F…..232¡C
    sunflower oil, semi-refined…………….450¡F…..232¡C
    olive pomace oil………………………460¡F…..238¡C
    extra light olive oil………………….468¡F…..242¡C
    butter, clarified (Ghee)……………….485¡F…..252¡C
    soybean oil…………………………..495¡F…..257¡C
    safflower oil…………………………510¡F…..266¡C
    avocado oil…………………………..520¡F…..271¡C
    Alphabetically;
    almond oil……………………………420¡F…..216¡C
    avocado oil…………………………..520¡F…..271¡C
    butter……………………………….350¡F…..177¡C
    butter, clarified (Ghee)……………….485¡F…..252¡C
    canola oil, unrefined………………….225¡F…..107¡C
    canola oil, semi-refined……………….350¡F…..177¡C
    canola oil, refined……………………400¡F…..204¡C
    coconut oil…………………………..350¡F…..177¡C
    corn oil, unrefined……………………320¡F…..160¡C
    corn oil, refined……………………..450¡F…..232¡C
    cottonseed oil………………………..420¡F…..216¡C
    flaxseed oil, unrefined………………..225¡F…..107¡C
    grapeseed oil…………………………420¡F…..216¡C
    hazelnut oil………………………….430¡F…..221¡C
    hemp seed oil…………………………330¡F…..165¡C
    lard…………………………………370¡F…..182¡C
    macadamia nut oil……………………..390¡F…..199¡C
    olive oil, extra virgin………………..320¡F…..160¡C
    olive oil, extra virgin, high quality……405¡F…..207¡C
    olive oil, virgin……………………..420¡F…..216¡C
    olive oil, extra light…………………468¡F…..242¡C
    olive pomace oil………………………460¡F…..238¡C
    peanut oil, unrefined………………….320¡F…..160¡C
    peanut oil……………………………440¡F…..227¡C
    peanut oil, refined……………………450¡F…..232¡C
    safflower oil, unrefined……………….225¡F…..107¡C
    safflower oil, semi-refined…………….320¡F…..160¡C
    safflower oil, refined…………………450¡F…..232¡C
    safflower oil…………………………510¡F…..266¡C
    sesame oil, unrefined………………….350¡F…..177¡C
    sesame oil……………………………410¡F…..210¡C
    sesame oil, semi-refined……………….450¡F…..232¡C
    soy oil, unrefined…………………….320¡F…..160¡C
    soy oil, semi-refined………………….350¡F…..177¡C
    soy oil, refined………………………450¡F…..232¡C
    soybean oil…………………………..495¡F…..257¡C
    sunflower oil, unrefined……………….225¡F…..107¡C
    sunflower oil, high-oleic, unrefined…….320¡F…..160¡C
    sunflower oil…………………………440¡F…..227¡C
    sunflower oil, high-oleic, refined………450¡F…..232¡C
    sunflower oil, semi-refined…………….450¡F…..232¡C
    vegetable shortening…………………..360¡F…..182¡C
    walnut oil, unrefined………………….320¡F…..160¡C
    walnut oil, semi-refined……………….400¡F…..204¡C

  55. rcocean @ 9:17

    Actually, I consider the meal you describe as one that is healthy and wholesome, so long as you didn’t put oil all over the roast. Meat is not evil, unless it is processed, contains chemicals, preservatives, and nitrates, such as found in bacon, lunch meats, and deli slices. The Oscar Mayer jingle is responsible for all the child cancer that is so epidemic today. Eating too much meat, of course, will leach calcium from your skeleton. It’s a myth that you need 3 meals that include concentrated protein servings each day. One serving of meat, fish or eggs, at three or four ounces, is all you need, unless you’re a construction worker, athlete, or marathoner.

  56. Rcocean,
    Your meal sounds delicious, though I would have added roasted broccoli or roasted Brussels sprouts as a side.😉

  57. I don’t know how Brussels sprouts have gotten such a bad name. Roast them w/ some olive oil and freshly ground pepper. Delicious!

  58. Nick,
    My mother’s-in-law parents would boil Brussels sprouts and she had to eat them. She hated them for decades until she finally gave roasted sprouts a try.

    Boiled! Blech!

    I agree on the roasted. They have a nice, nutty flavor.

  59. I don’t care what you do to brussels sprouts…..or cauliflower. They taste like acetone. There is a horrible chemical aftertaste that is unable to be disguised. I’d rather suck on old used kapok.

  60. DBQ,
    That is very interesting. I wonder why our taste buds tell us such remarkably different things?

    Have you tried both roasted with no success? Roasted in olive oil with a head of peeled garlic cloves tossed in?

    If so, ah well, the good Lord made all kinds, and that leaves more for me.😉

  61. Omg…doesnt eat 10,11,12, or 13 poor fool has got to be starving. Thing is he can only afford what he does eat because its subsidized. You want a real no input egg….try a buck each. Real no input cheeses. Ten bucks plus a pound. Real grazed beef….oh he doesnt eat red meat. He likes his dyed fish. Cold pressed olive oil…..or second runnings. Fact is even with scale of operations….none of the crap you advise is wholesome and affordable. No grocery could afford to stock the real stuff and sell it before it expires. And make a profit. Try growing your own. Youll soon see how much eggs really cost….and you want to toss out the yoke? You could feed it to your pigs….if you ate meat. Or you could figure…the yoke is ok to eat. Good for you really. Smith has a recipe for yupees. Put your boots on and do it yourself….your groceries will. Consume your budget. Make it tge standard….you wont be able to affird yir neighbirs ebt card. Do i think the one percent of farmers can support the 99 percent bellies. No. But some how are. We’d need one to ten to support your diet. If you can afford it fine. But you arent buying the real deal nor can you prove it. For true cost start with a few hens.

  62. Frontline’s premier of “Supplements and Safety” just aired now.

    I found it profound how the producers dedicated time to the discussion of the dangers of oxidized oils. I’ve excepted a section (below) from the transcript.

    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/frontline/film/supplements-and-safety/transcript

    –Snip–
    The third most widely used supplement in America is fish oil.  The Omega 3s contained in the oil are believed by many to be essential for good health.

    ADAM ISMAIL, GOED fish oil trade association:
      DHA, Omega 3 in particular, is— is extremely important—

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
      It also helps prevent disease, according to the man who heads one of the largest fish oil trade associations.

    ADAM ISMAIL:
      There’s certainly ample evidence that it helps things like reducing blood pressure, reducing your risk of coronary death.

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
      But the science behind fish oil is a little more complicated than that.

    PRESTON MASON, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School:
      So these are two capsules.  This is an FDA-approved product—

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
      Dr. Preston Mason is a Harvard University researcher.  Here he’s comparing prescription-quality fish oil to the oil found in over-the-counter supplements.

    PRESTON MASON:
      And give it a smell.

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
      [on camera]  Smells a little bit fishy but not— not bad.

    PRESTON MASON:
      Right.  Smells— you’re going to have always some smell.

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
      [voice-over]  One of the issues with fish oil is it’s delicate.  It’s extracted as a byproduct from oily fish like anchovies.  As the fish get crushed, the oil is exposed to oxygen.  And it doesn’t take much oxygen to turn the oil rancid.

    PRESTON MASON:
      This is a common supplement for fish oil.  See what that smells like.

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
      [on camera]  Oh!

    PRESTON MASON:
      What?

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
      That doesn’t smell good.  That’s— that smells like it’s going bad.

    PRESTON MASON:
      Yeah.  Right.  Yeah.  It’s a very strong, fishy smell.

    GILLIAN FINDLAY:
    [voice-over]  If it was simply an odor issue, that would be one thing.  But oxidized oil contains oxidized lipids, one of the building blocks of cells.  We’ve long known that lipids, when oxidized, can be harmful.

    PRESTON MASON:
      So oxidized lipid triggers inflammatory responses within our body, particularly in our cells.  And if we ingest oxidized lipid, we can trigger these inflammatory changes that can lead to things like cardiovascular disease.

    –END–

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